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Joker

12ozProphet Original
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Joker last won the day on August 29 2019

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  1. TO get back on track and quit talking about myself... I just learned about this small boutique shop here in Portland called UNLESS Collective. I'm kinda feeling this yellow hoodie and these shoes...
  2. It'll probably happen next year. The wife and I have been making the trek down there once a year for the last handful of years. It's good to get some sun therapy after 6-8 months of Northwest grey skies, cold air, and rain. And it's always good to see the old painting partners like Giant, Brisk, and Persue, and of course Bobby and crew at Tribal.
  3. He usually announces Art Night on his Instagram page, or you can always reach out to him through DMs and find out times and location. I showed up with something to drink, an iPad and Apple pencil, and sketched for about three hours. Mike spent the night working on his car and spinning records. It was fun.
  4. Yeah, you should. The shop is cool, there's a tattoo parlor with some incredible artists working in there, and I believe there's a skateboard shop as well. There's usually a beautiful lowrider or two in the parking lot, and if the garage door is open you can see some of the Graffiti painted on the warehouse walls. Also, if you're into it, Mike Giant does an Art Night once a week (I think every Wednesday). He invites folks to come hang out at his studio and draw or paint or whatever. I went this past summer while I was in town and it was pretty cool to meet like-minded folks and see the work they're doing.
  5. I mostly just did graphics for t-shirts. Characters, tags, and a few Tribal letter pieces. A friend of mine designed one of their first cut & sew jackets which was based on a vintage denim jacket. I kinda helped with that but I wouldn't give myself design credit. For the most part my job at Tribal was graphics for tees and filling orders to be shipped out. I also helped with those early 90s trade shows (set up/tear down, and sometimes sales) in San Diego and Vegas. I had a day job but I would go to Tribal after work most days because I got off work around 2:30pm so I could be there to help them finish out their day. What's really cool is they have kept at least one if not more of everything they've ever done. And every writer and artist they've ever worked with has also given them some kind of framed art so the back of house walls are covered in some incredible artwork, both framed and painted directly to the walls. So much great history in there.
  6. @Ray40 The sketch on the right is an old sketch I did for you a while back. I think you should study it… a lot… and copy it line for line until you know you can do it without looking at it. Same with the sketch on the left. The goal is to get you to understand the flow of the letters, the relationship of one letter next to the other, how the interact with one another. These are simple pieces, especially the left sketch, so it should be easy for you to learn from. The tags are horrible, sorry, but it’s something to work with.
  7. Welcome back, Ray. Yep, that looks good for a solid simple. Your letters have similar weight to all of them, the bits to the left and arrow to the right give the whole thing balance. Nice. My only feedback is the Y has 50% more 'style' to it than the R and A. Either add some style to those letters or pull back on the Y. Up to you.
  8. I think this sketch is fine but the leg of the R and the backside of the E being one 'thing' isn't working. I think because the only thing you have to indicate that it's an R is the little bit coming off the letter just before connecting to the E. If there was more of that, or more line work to define each letter more, that might fix that one minor area. I've always been a fan of flat-bottom pieces like this. When I was coming up in DC I made a day trip to Baltimore with Mesk and Wake and we saw several pieces with that style and it blew me away. Anyway - I see what you're stretching for (sorry... had to )by elongating the R to the P but I think it's slightly too much a stretch. BUT, I love that you went there. Maybe the leg of the R goes behind and under the straight bars and comes back up to form the P? That way you can define the E a little more? Sorry, I don't have time for sketches today to show you what I mean.
  9. Yep... that was a good one. Thank you for sharing!!
  10. Joker

    bicicletas

    Also, not sure where you're located but if you have a local racing scene I would check their message board for a "For Sale" thread. Especially this time of year when guys are looking to unload bikes or parts so they can upgrade for next year. Bike racers are like any racing culture... they have to have the latest and greatest so they're constantly upgrading. You can get some quality stuff for cheap that's only been used for one or two years. And you can haggle.
  11. Joker

    bicicletas

    With tubeless you'll need tubeless valve stems and some sealant. I use Muc-Off valve stems and Stans sealant. They have one that is compatible with Co2 cartridges should you need to fix a flat. Most sealants aren't compatible with Co2. Also, make sure the rim tape on the rims is tubeless ready. I'd assume if the wheels are tubeless ready then you're good to go. One thing to keep in mind with Tubeless tires is that you'll need a high-pressure floor pump to get air in the tires, at least when seating the tires for the first time. I take that back... you don't NEED a high-pressure floor pump but it will make you're life wayyyyyy easier if you have one (before I invested in one it took me almost two hours to seat two tires. I've never been so exhausted in my life). The reason is because of the way tubeless tires set up on the rim. Typically you'll have a tube and air goes into the tube, and the air is contained in the tube so it doesn't escape. With tubeless it's... well, tubeless. So when you pump air it goes into the tire, and since the tire isn't perfectly seated into the rim yet air can escape as you're pumping it in. What a high-pressure pump does is allow you to pump air into a chamber, and then release a blast of air at once. This blast of air seats the tire in place. Then you spin the wheel around and move it around in a swirling motion so the sealant coats the tire beads and creates a tighter seal. Once they're seated you're fine. Air will slowly escape over a several days. You'll notice after two or three days that you have to put air in your tires. You won't have to use the blast of air, just a normal pump. All high-pressure floor pumps have a release for the blast of air from the chamber. And if you keep the release open the pump becomes a regular floor pump. I personally use the Lezyne digital pressure overdrive floor pump, which was way too much money for a pump, but it works great. I've heard great things about the Foundation Airblast tubeless floor pump which is $90. And you can always set your tires up and take them to your local bike shop to pump air into them to get them seated. At least until you can get a high-pressure floor pump yourself.
  12. Joker

    bicicletas

    @Elena Delle Donne- tubulars are for racing, period. You don't want tubulars for rolling around town or adventure riding. Tubulars have to be glued to the rim and it's a process. Changing tires is also a process. I would go with clincher wheels or tubeless ready wheels. I've been riding tubeless for the last five years and I'll never go back. With tubeless minor punctures get plugged immediately. Bigger punctures require a plug but they work incredibly well. There's been so many rides where I've gotten a puncture and didn't even realize it until I got home and saw some sealant around my tire. Not sure if those Boyd wheels are tubeless ready but if they are I would recommend looking into adding tubeless tires w/ sealant. I'm pretty sure the 2021 SRAM Red22 groupset is a mechanical groupset. You should be able to find a decent set for not too much money. The Pros Closet has some SRAM Red22 components right now. I've been running Red eTap for about ten years and I swear by it. I probably have to charge my derailleur batteries about every three months or so... possibly longer. So charging isn't really a big issue. And they're super-easy to charge. I don't know much about Shimano so I can't speak to it.
  13. A post of my glory days, posted by @glorydays My dreads were not coming in nicely. Most of those photos with me in them are from Tribal's first tour of Japan. That was a damn good time... absolutely.
  14. You have any idea how many people out there write Joker? I doubt it's the most popular name but it's definitely up there. I might as well write John Smith. If you think about the 'hard & fast' rule of giving yourself a name, the history of why your choice is important, the rule stems from a time when the rules were being made. A time when there was maybe a few thousand writers. Cut to now... we have millions of writers out there. So having the same name as another writer - one city away or one country away - is highly likely. Of course you could tap into the old school naming convention of adding a number to your name. GERM23, GRM4, for example. You can use the Graffiti classic - the street number you live on (if that applies to you), or you can use a favorite number, your age, a number that has relevance to you or a moment in time, etc.. @GrmAll that said - I think what matters most is what you do with the name.
  15. @nachodik- just a few thoughts noted below. I tried to add some further ideas to the second sketch but it all got wonky, sorry about that. The gist is to tuck the back of your E under and through your R. This is a pretty common trick a lot of writers use and works pretty well. The top sketch looks pretty good to me, the only thing I would do is shift the E to the left slightly so the E and P are touching. All the other letters are connected/touching so this will make it feel a part of the piece.
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