Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
isor357

Stole a tree

Recommended Posts

I nearly spent 65 on a tree but decided to get drunk and steal one instead. What a fucked up tradition. Lets cut down perfectly good trees stick them in houses, hope they dont catch fire, and pull em down a few weeks later. Last year my tree stand leaked and fucked up teh hardwoods... I dont really have much money for gifts and dont want anything from anybody. When i think Christmas i envision people being artificially nice and it makes me sick. I may go steal someones christmas lights later. Last xmas for isorus wrex. Although xmas eve seems like a safe time to rock out some insane spots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My rents used to have a retardedly nice house.

 

One year we got a 14 foot tree, shit was pimp.

 

 

 

 

Until every needle fell off and the tree fell over, fucking up the whole living room.

 

 

Shit was full of bugs son!

 

 

 

Tree bugs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it has nothing to do with jesus...but when the christian took over the roman empire all the pagan traditions like "easter and christmas" were adopted by the christian govt. so that it wouldnt upset the majority of the pagan practitioners. Just as the Native american were forced to believe in chritianity and ended up mixing both religions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i want to get a plant. it would really liven up the place.

 

get this tree.....the leaves stay open until you touch them and they fold...

 

sensitiveopen.jpg

 

31519385_ae2b18ad01_m.jpg

 

sensitiv.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
what does a christmas tree have to do with jesus birth anyways?...

 

According to wiki it could mean:

  1. Patron trees (for example, the Irminsul, Thor's Oak and the figurative Yggdrasil) held special significance for the ancient Germanic tribes, appearing throughout historic accounts as sacred symbols and objects. Among early Germanic tribes the Yule tradition was celebrated by sacrificing male animals and slaves by suspending them on the branches of trees.
  2. The Christmas tree is often explained as a Christianization of the ancient pagan idea that the evergreen tree represents a celebration of the renewal of life.
  3. The modern custom cannot be proved to be directly descended from pagan tradition. It can, however, be traced to 16th century Germany; Ingeborg Weber-Keller (Marburg professor of European ethnology) identified as the earliest reference a Bremen guild chronicle of 1570 which reports how a small fir was decorated with apples, nuts, dates, pretzels and paper flowers, and erected in the guild-house, for the benefit of the guild members' children, who collected the dainties on Christmas day. Another early reference is from Basel, where the tailor apprentices carried around town a tree decorated with apples and cheese in 1597.

That said, Im not even sure I want to know what the rabbit laying eggs means.



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is sad though. a lot of fake niceness going around. and greedy little spoiled snotty-nosed kids wanting gifts like it's their parent's and family's obligation to get them gifts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
According to wiki it could mean:

  1. Patron trees (for example, the Irminsul, Thor's Oak and the figurative Yggdrasil) held special significance for the ancient Germanic tribes, appearing throughout historic accounts as sacred symbols and objects. Among early Germanic tribes the Yule tradition was celebrated by sacrificing male animals and slaves by suspending them on the branches of trees.
  2. The Christmas tree is often explained as a Christianization of the ancient pagan idea that the evergreen tree represents a celebration of the renewal of life.
  3. The modern custom cannot be proved to be directly descended from pagan tradition. It can, however, be traced to 16th century Germany; Ingeborg Weber-Keller (Marburg professor of European ethnology) identified as the earliest reference a Bremen guild chronicle of 1570 which reports how a small fir was decorated with apples, nuts, dates, pretzels and paper flowers, and erected in the guild-house, for the benefit of the guild members' children, who collected the dainties on Christmas day. Another early reference is from Basel, where the tailor apprentices carried around town a tree decorated with apples and cheese in 1597.

That said, Im not even sure I want to know what the rabbit laying eggs means.



 

 

 

thanks MAR for the info....but i still think people put them up and decorate them cause "they look pretty"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Bunny

 

Story behind the easter bunny laying eggs.

 

The idea of an egg-laying rabbit came to the United States in the 18th century. German immigrants in the Pennsylvania Dutch area told their children about the "Osterhase". "Hase" means "hare", not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the "Easter Bunny" indeed is a hare, not a rabbit.

 

Only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and bonnets before Easter. Presumably, the "Oschter Haws" laid them when the children were not looking.

 

A hundred years later Jakob Grimm wrote of long-standing similar myths in Germany itself. Noting many related landmarks and customs, Grimm suggested that these derived from legends of Ostara.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found pictures of the tree bugs our tree had!

 

pine-sawfly-2.jpg

pine-sawfly-3.jpg

 

Damage

 

European Pine Sawfly

 

The first instar larvae (the ones hatching from the egg) can only eat the needle surface which causes the needles to turn brown and wilt, appearing straw-like. As the larvae grow, they remain together and feed from the tip of a needle to the base. The larvae feed on older foliage and move from branch to branch as they strip the needles. Trees which are entirely defoliated are severely stunted but since the new growth is rarely attacked, the trees will survive. Larvae will often migrate to new trees if the needles on their current host have been devoured. Heavily infested trees end up with a "bottle brush" effect. That is, all the old needles are missing and only the current year's needles are present.

 

I'm talking 100s of these fuckers.

 

BEST CHRISTMAS EVAR!!1!@

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register for a 12ozProphet forum account or sign in to comment

You need to be a forum member in order to comment. Forum accounts are separate from shop accounts.

Create an account

Register to become a 12ozProphet forum member.

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×