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--zeSto--

Island Foods!

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^ click the Ting Bottles!

 

 

 

 

Island Foods Own!

 

I just came back from a jerk chicken lunch and I think

that the Caribean has pefected hot weather foods.

Buffalo can keep the wings and mexico can keep the tortillas...

There's NOTHING like Jerk Chicken (except maybe for a goat roti!)

 

http://www.portmore.org/album/p0899-01.jpg'>

^ cooking the real jerk way!

 

http://www.caribcon.com/onestop.gif'>

^ with real jerk sauce!

 

http://www.sxm-restaurants.com/orient/pirate/swordfish.gif'>

^ mmmm.... jerk swordfish!

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Guest WebsterUno

why do they call it Jerk?

 

Dude, swordifsh....ah man, that shit is good!!

I can cook a mean swordfish! I love seafood.

 

and anything MANGO!!

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^ yeah... I know you'd prefer a 'big burrrrrito'.

 

I'm not sure if you can 'Jerk' tofu.

The meat is ever so slightly burnt and that makes the cripsy texture.

I dont know if you can burn tofu. Well I'm sure I could do it... but it wouldn't be edible.

 

 

 

Jerk:

 

Jerk cuisine, like most cuisines throughout the Caribbean is a mixture of native cooking and foreign influences such as Asian, African, European and East Indian. The process of cooking food slowly in pits was brought to the islands by the African slaves. In the 1600's the Maroons (runaway slaves) coated meat with spice mixtures and cooked it in a pit as a way of preserving it.

 

Jerk mixtures can be either wet pastes or marinades or dry rubs. They are spicy and delicious combinations of ingredients such as ginger, tamarind, nutmeg, thyme, green onions, allspice berries, and Scotch bonnet chiles. Meat, poultry and fish are coated with the jerk seasoning and marinated for several hours and up to two days. The meat is then cooked in a pit, smoker or barbecue grill. The secret is to cook it very slowly.

 

 

 

 

Recipie!

 

Jerk Sauce

 

Edyth James of Saffron's Restaurant grew up in Jamaica. Here she treats us to a

traditional recipe from the Caribbean. This jerk sauce can be used as a marinade,

dressing or sauce on many different dishes. Try experimenting with different meats.

You can also use this sauce as a marinade for chicken to be cooked on an open grill.

 

2 ½ Scotch bonnet peppers, coarsely

chopped

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped

2 bunches chives or scallions, trimmed to

remove the roots, and coarsely chopped

1 cup freshly chopped flat-lear parsley

4 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger

3 tablespoons salt, or to taste

2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme

2 tablespoons ground allspice

½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground cloves

1/4 cup fresh lime juice or distilled white

vinegar

3 tablespoons dark soy sauce

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

2 tablespoons water, or as needed

 

1. Combine the peppers, onion, chive or

scallions, parsley, and garlic in a food

processor and puree to a coarse paste.

2. Work in the ginger, salt, thyme, allspice,

nutmeg, black pepper, cinnamon, cloves,

lime juice, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and

brown sugar.

3. Add more soy sauce and salt, as needed,

to taste.

4. Add water to reach a thick but pourable

consistency.

 

Yield: About 3 cups of sauce

Heat Scale: Hot

 

BOSTON BEACH WET JERK RUB there's a beach in boston?

1/2 cup fresh thyme leaves

2 bunches(about 13) green onions

4 tablespoons finely diced fresh ginger

3 Scotch bonnet or Habanero peppers, stemmed

1/4 cup peanut oil

5 garlic cloves chopped

3 Bay leaves

2 teaspoons freshly ground allspice

1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

1 table spoon freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon freshly ground coriander

1 teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon

2 teaspoons salt

Juice of 1 lime(of course!)

 

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until a thick, chunky paste results. Makes 2 and 1/2 cups of marinade, which can be stored in a tightly sealed, refrigerated container for several months. Rub the meat thoroughly with this paste. For larger cuts such as pork roasts, slash the meat at two-inch intervals and force the jerk rub into the cavities. Allow the meat to marinate overnight before smoking over a slow fire until well done. This quantity of marinade is sufficient for two to three chickens or ten pounds of pork. For an extra spicy taste, extra

sauce can be used for basting.

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Originally posted by Kilo7-

 

 

I'm not sure if you can 'Jerk' tofu.

The meat is ever so slightly burnt and that makes the cripsy texture.

I dont know if you can burn tofu. Well I'm sure I could do it... but it wouldn't be edible.

 

BOSTON BEACH WET JERK RUB there's a beach in boston?

 

 

well i guess BBQ tofu is good, so maybe i should try jerking it...that sounds funny.

 

 

and yes silly there's a beach, America's first public beach established in 1896

 

http://www.revere.org/images/gallery/large/RevereBeach_from_north.GIF'>

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Guest WebsterUno

yeah, I seen some Jerk sauce at the grocery store,

and I wondered what it was. Thanx for the info.

Sounds good.

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Originally posted by Vanity

man, the titles just says island foods...

 

I'll never belong.. good grief.

 

good one Charlie Brown!

but yesh... I guess you can play along.

 

would Vegemite count as an 'Island Food'?

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i just made some islands of my own ;)

(i should really be doing something more constructive)

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Guest imported_El Mamerro

Jerk is primo shit... it's a shame PR isn't very into it. Damn spaniards...

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BOSTON BEACH WET JERK RUB there's a beach in boston? Dude, no, not Boston, Mass., Boston Beach, Jambakia. It's east of Port Antonio, niggas know, just take a bus over the island from Kingston bus station, park your ass at the cheap ass De Montevin Hotel on the peninsula in Port Antonio, get a good night's sleep, you'll need it, wake up to free breakfast of aki and saltfish (awesome island fruit/vegetable with hydrated salted fish), rent their cheap ass 250hp bike, learn how to ride on the right hand side of the road, throw you're girl on the back, ride into town and score some dank from you're local rastafarian, ride out east on the road along the water until you come to Boston Beach, you can't miss it if you go in the afternoon, it's like an all day bar-b-q eating fest on the beach and everyone is invited. The key to real jerk chicken is in the allspice bush whose wood is used to smoke the meat low and slow, but oak or mesquite work ok too.

 

Now what about pepperpot? It's an island meat stew that can be kept forever without refrigeration, so long as everytime you add meat you add the casareep juice?, and you boil it once a day, and you don't add lamb or something else. Some restaurants have kept their pepperpot going for twenty years or more.

 

Ok, someone is holding out on us, Ellllll Maaaaamehhhhrrrrrrooooo?

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It's called JERK because..

 

the meat is all tender, and you can just 'jerk' it right off the bone.

 

holla.

 

jerk tofu?

i don't think so...

 

but maybe Jerk [flavored] Seitan or Jerk [flavored] Tempeh..

 

i'm gonna work on this one, i've been saying i was gonna figure out a veggie version foeva

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i thought this thread was going to be about pacific foods, with all the mokes on here...

 

 

i'm slowly learning to cook samoan foods.. any of you hawaiian kids feel like conquering this thread with me? ;x

 

 

fa'a samoa

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