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glorydays

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Everything posted by glorydays

  1. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    J.W. Anderson for Uniqlo SS 2019
  2. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Who are your guys' favorite designers? I've been selling off my streetwear and buying less but higher quality clothing. I'll start looking like a clown if I wear what kids are wearing at my age. I've been buying older comme des garcons labels and other Japanese designers lately Most notably Junya Watanabe
  3. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    And in case you guys keep forgetting my obsession with Junya Watanabe
  4. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    The North Face Urban Exploration line Tech Denim SS 2019
  5. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Haven Shop editorial for Sacai SS 2019
  6. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    TEDDY SANTIS GOING OFF Aime Leon Dore Spring / Summer 2019
  7. glorydays

    Dangerous hypotheticals

    Thread is for "what ifs" Anything goes....no judging Just put up taboo hypotheticals Mine will be: if you were to rob a bank, how would you do it? Put up your plans
  8. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    National Athletic Goods for The Bureau Belfast
  9. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    The Bureau Belfast flexing on peasants Kapital
  10. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Needles styled by the Bureau Belfast Ireland is being fucking fresh right now
  11. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Nanamica styled by the Bureau Belfast
  12. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Visvim styled by the Bureau Belfast
  13. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Engineered Garments for the Bureau Belfast featuring wool milled by Malloy and Sons
  14. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    5 Things You Need to Know About Chanel’s New Creative Director Virginie Viard Earlier today, Chanel announced that Virginie Viard will replace Karl Lagerfeld as creative director for the luxury French fashion house. A close friend of the late designer, Viard has been under Lagerfeld’s wing for over three decades, described by many as his right-hand-woman, his protégé, and dear friend. She appeared alongside him as he closed his Spring/Summer 2019 show last year and represented him when he was feeling too tired to take a bow after what was his final couture show this January. Yet despite emerging alongside Lagerfeld in tfront of the entire fashion world, Viard remains something of an enigma. So, as she readies herself to step into Lagerfeld’s immaculately-polished shoes at the head of the house, we round up everything you need to know about Chanel’s new creative director, Virginie Viard. Viard started out at Chanel as an intern In 1987, four years after Lagerfeld was appointed as creative director in ’83, the chamberlain to Prince Rainer of Monaco recommended Viard for a position at Chanel. She subsequently joined the crew as a haute-couture embroidery intern, and so started a 32-year-long relationship with Chanel and with Lagerfeld. She worked with Lagerfeld at Chloé before returning with him to Chanel Evidentially impressed with her work, she grew to become something of Lagerfeld’s protégé; he kept her by his side during a five-year stint at Chloé (’92-’97), before bringing her back to Chanel and appointing her as haute couture coordinator. In 2000, she began to oversee ready-to-wear. She told French magazine Crash, “When Karl took over Chloé, I followed him and worked there for five years. I didn’t really notice a difference, since I was still just working with Karl.” Their relationship wasn’t just professional Lagerfeld and Viard’s relationship wasn’t all fabric selections and atelier meetings, however. Over the years the pair grew close, with Lagerfeld explaining during Netflix’s 7 Days Out documentary series, “Virginie is the most important person, not only for me but also for the atelier, for everything. She is my right arm and even if I don’t see her, we are on the phone all the time.” What Lagerfeld did not divulge to Netflix, however, is that sometimes he would text Viard pretending to be his cat, Choupette. She revealed during an interview with W Magazine, “He signs them, Your Choupette,” she said before adding, “He might not like that I’m saying this.” Viard has designed costume for film The granddaughter of silk manufacturers, Viard has always been intrigued by fashion but, she as told Crash magazine her original plan was to make theater costumes. She started out as a wardrobe assistant, working on several films and plays including ’93’s French drama Thee Colors: Blue starring Juliette Binoche, and ’94’s French-Polish comedy-drama Three Colors: White, both of which were directed by Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski. Fashion is not her inspiration Lagerfeld once said that fashion is a reflection of our lives and times, and it would seem that Viard takes a similar stance. She cites her son (specifically, her son doing his homework), music, theater, her partner, and exhibitions as just some of the non-industry inspirations that influence her work. In the same Crash interview she explained, “I keep an eye on fashion, but it’s not what inspires me.” Rather, the way she designs is mostly intuitive. “I feel like I’m working the same way I did twenty years ago. And everything goes along smoothly because, above all, our studio is about teamwork. I don’t feel like I’m a “Director.” What’s more, it doesn’t seem as though ego will have much of a place in her atelier. “Our hierarchy isn’t felt throughout the studio, it’s seamless. Though the teams do count on me, of course. There are never any conflicts. In the end, it’s Karl who looks at the outfits with the workshop leaders; I don’t even need to be there. It’s always he who has the last word.” That, however, is clearly about to change.
  15. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Take a Look at All the Collections From Moncler Genius's "One House, Different Voices" Project 0 MONCLER RICHARD QUINN 1 MONCLER PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI 2 MONCLER 1952 3 MONCLER GRENOBLE 4 MONCLER SIMONE ROCHA 5 MONCLER CRAIG GREEN 6 MONCLER 1017 ALYX 9SM MATTHEW WILLIAMS 7 MONCLER FRAGMENT HIROSHI FUJIWARA 8 MONCLER PALM ANGELS FRANCESCO RAGAZZI
  16. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Canada Goose by Michelle Donnelly
  17. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    10 Years of Technical Excellence: Arc'teryx Veilance's Taka Kasuga “It’s more of an evolution than a revolution,” Taka Kasuga explains, walking through Veilance‘s Fall/Winter 2019 collection. Rows of technical garments are displayed by color, emphasizing a concise selection earthy tones informed by Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky. Kasuga has been with the company for just over three-and-a-half years, joining the primarily-utilitarian Arc’teryx brand after putting in work as a freelance design consultant and designer for Junya Watanabe of COMME des GARÇONS. He’s quiet but intelligent and gets excited when explaining technical detailing, a cornerstone of the Arc’teryx brand. Veilance (formerly known as Arc’teryx Veilance) is the outdoor-focused company’s fashion-forward branch, launched a mere 30 years after Arc’teryx’s forerunner, Rock Solid, was established in 1989. Though FW19 marks a decade of the brand’s progressive designs, Kasuga insists that this collection isn’t necessarily a celebration. “We’re doing what we always do,” he shrugs, smiling. ”We’re slightly improving our core gear, making it better every year.” Kasuga lifts one of Veilance’s new designs, the Euler IS coat, from its display hook. Unlike the brand’s signature Monitor coat, which boasts heavy-duty GORE-TEX Pro, the Euler is lined with one of the Gore company’s newest creations: GORE-TEX Infinium. Infinium represents the core ideals of Veilance itself: it delivers a variety of technical specs in a highly versatile package. Unlike GORE-TEX Pro, Infinium is comparably more dextrous and arguably more comfortable in mild climates because it breathes better. The downside is that it’s not fully waterproof, but with the Euler’s lightweight shell, tall neck and alternate form (it’s also offered as a shorter jacket), this isn’t a merely jacket for climbing mountains — the Euler, in-line with its Infinium lining, is extremely flexible, transitioning from hiking excursions to offices with ease. This fluidity underlines Veilance’s close relationship with Gore; indeed, it informs all of Kasuga’s designs. “It’s more of an evolution than a revolution,” Taka Kasuga explains, walking through Veilance‘s Fall/Winter 2019 collection. Rows of technical garments are displayed by color, emphasizing a concise selection earthy tones informed by Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky. Kasuga has been with the company for just over three-and-a-half years, joining the primarily-utilitarian Arc’teryx brand after putting in work as a freelance design consultant and designer for Junya Watanabe of COMME des GARÇONS. He’s quiet but intelligent and gets excited when explaining technical detailing, a cornerstone of the Arc’teryx brand. Veilance (formerly known as Arc’teryx Veilance) is the outdoor-focused company’s fashion-forward branch, launched a mere 30 years after Arc’teryx’s forerunner, Rock Solid, was established in 1989. Though FW19 marks a decade of the brand’s progressive designs, Kasuga insists that this collection isn’t necessarily a celebration. “We definitely don’t worry about trends” “We’re doing what we always do,” he shrugs, smiling. ”We’re slightly improving our core gear, making it better every year.” Kasuga lifts one of Veilance’s new designs, the Euler IS coat, from its display hook. Unlike the brand’s signature Monitor coat, which boasts heavy-duty GORE-TEX Pro, the Euler is lined with one of the Gore company’s newest creations: GORE-TEX Infinium. Infinium represents the core ideals of Veilance itself: it delivers a variety of technical specs in a highly versatile package. Unlike GORE-TEX Pro, Infinium is comparably more dextrous and arguably more comfortable in mild climates because it breathes better. The downside is that it’s not fully waterproof, but with the Euler’s lightweight shell, tall neck and alternate form (it’s also offered as a shorter jacket), this isn’t a merely jacket for climbing mountains — the Euler, in-line with its Infinium lining, is extremely flexible, transitioning from hiking excursions to offices with ease. This fluidity underlines Veilance’s close relationship with Gore; indeed, it informs all of Kasuga’s designs. He gestures at the sleek wearables hanging on the racks behind him. “We really want to push the idea of modular layering, where you wear the same things throughout the year but add and remove clothes as the weather changes. We’re offering the complete package.” Innovation comes in many forms, like the Conduit AR jacket, a flurry-ready update to Veilance’s classic LT jacket that’s equally suited as a liner for the Euler or a stand-alone layer. Then, there’s the Dinitz fleece, a technical modernization of the cozy staple that comes in both crewneck and jacket variants. “I’m actually wearing [the Dinitz] myself,” Kasuga says brushing a hand across his subtly-fluffed sweater. As for the jeans? “We’re working on some engineered denim right now,” he grins. “These are just a prototype, but they might end up something like this.” Kasuga’s laid-back approach to personal style belies his passion for utilitarian clothing. This passion informs the subtle details that make each item in the collection feel personal, bestowing a sense of intimacy uncommon in technical clothing. “Yeah, I don’t usually think about [terms like] techwear,” Kasuga concedes. “The people I can see wearing Veilance … [appreciate] clean lines and want to stay protected in weather.” Veilance clients care about that delicate line that runs between function and fashion, unwilling to compromise practical details for the sake of trends. “We definitely don’t worry about trends,” he laughs. Veilance’s complete wardrobe includes essentials like sweat-wicking merino wool base layers and the lightweight Nomin pack, completely secured against inclimate weather thanks to its WaterTight zippers and taped seams. Its signature Blazer LT and Voronoi trousers return for FW19 in thematic colors, loaded with snug pockets and body-sensitive seams. “The body articulation is important,” Kasuga insists. “Our clothes should feel like a second skin. When you lift your arm or move your leg, the clothes should move with you.” Dynamic pattern-making yields trim cuts flatter the human form without restricting it, with clever use of technical textiles — read: plenty of GORE-TEX — to warm the wearer without resorting to mummy-like layers. Technical clothing often resists easy categorization, as certain functionalities are better suited to rugged treks and other details are more appropriate for urban wear; Veilance draws from the former to deliver silhouettes more in line with the latter. “We want people to wear our clothes,” insists Kasuga. An appreciably everyman attitude underlines Veilance’s designs — if the everyman was a slick, stylish businessman from the future. Still, Kasuga’s penchant for whetting away unnecessary facets so as to highlight each garment’s core merits generates all-purpose clothing that doesn’t demand a knowledge of technical jargon to appreciate. This is Veilance’s true strength: crafting clothing that whispers, instead of screams. Discreetly technical, objectively stylish.
  18. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Luxury Brands Are Finally Learning How to Speak Streetwear Their Own Way It’s been five weeks since men’s fashion month kicked off in London and with the exception of Burberry, Gucci and Balenciaga — each have opted for co-ed shows presented during the upcoming women’s fashion month — another men’s season has drawn to a close. The most evident shift could be observed in the transition from dominant streetwear silhouettes to a new sense of tailoring as seen at Louis Vuitton, Dior Homme and Prada. After all, the same young men who in recent seasons have been parading down the runways in sneakers, technical outerwear and oversized everything are growing up. And so it wasn’t surprising that a number of fashion publications were quick to shout that streetwear is passé, over, done. But it’s not. Streetwear as luxury brands have made it out to be is evolving, and that’s a good thing for everyone. Ever since the early days of subversive subcultural movements in the 1970s, young surfers and skaters have gravitated towards garments expressing individuality and comfort, while also serving as sartorial emblems that signify being part of a specific tribe, often an international community of like-minded youngsters with a lifestyle encompassing similar tastes in fashion, music and art, and political beliefs. Wearing Stüssy T-shirts and later FUBU sweatshirts weren’t just status symbols, they were physical tokens of belonging. These brands never made just clothing. They made clothing with meaning. Still, major luxury houses remained dismissive of the growing cultural power of street culture, deeming it brand diluting. It took a number of forward-thinking designers to cross-pollinate the two once thought of as opposites by sending their luxury versions of banal streetwear items down the Paris runways — think Riccardo Tisci’s Fall/Winter 2011 “Rottweiler” collection for Givenchy, Balenciaga’s “Join a Weird Trip” sweatshirts designed by Nicholas Ghesquière for Fall/Winter 2012 and Céline’s beige rendition of the Air Force 1s for Fall/Winter 2014 under the helm of Phoebe Philo. By 2015, every luxury house, big or small, had created their indistinguishable take on the white, minimal sneaker inspired by adidas’ Stan Smith and Superstar models. It was as much of a safe entrance into this new phenomenon called “athleisure” and its closely-knit ties to streetwear, as it was a response to the casualization of the way people were starting to dress. Nothing innovative there. January 2017 was a turning point when Louis Vuitton’s artistic director Kim Jones launched a full-ranged collaboration with Supreme for the house’s Fall/Winter 2017 season. That same month, Demna Gvasalia debuted Balenciaga’s chunky Triple S sneaker — designed by footwear legend David Tourniaire-Beauciel, and inspired by retro Nike and New balance models — prompting instant consumer hysteria. For the first time, it was luxury, not streetwear, dictating the consumption behavior of young shoppers when it came to sneakers. Streetwear, sportswear and other luxury brands followed suit with a thousand and one versions of the “dad” sneaker and by the time Virgil Abloh debuted his first collection as artistic director of Louis Vuitton and Kim Jones at Dior Homme in June 2018, that same luxury influence on youth culture had transcended beyond sneakers alone. It isn’t hard to understand why premium brands want to court younger audiences. By 2025, 45 percent of the luxury market is set to be made up of Gen Z and Millennials, while these generations combined resulted in 85 percent of all luxury growth in 2017. In part, the new luxury consumer is starting to respond to luxury’s efforts towards streetwear. Mainly because of luxury’s new guard, including Virgil Abloh, Kim Jones and their more emerging peers Matthew Williams, Samuel Ross, Heron Preston and Jerry Lorenzo, who clearly understand that streetwear is about more than simply appropriating literal street style cues like graphic hoodies, oversized outerwear and sporty sneakers. Instead, the direction they’re taking us into isn’t streetwear as we know it. As Virgil Abloh worded it in the show notes for his latest Michael Jackson-inspired Fall/Winter 2019 collection: “[Streetwear’s] sportswear properties are undergoing a critical transformation into luxury.” Indeed, streetwear, as it was presented in the past Fall/Winter 2019 men’s season, is a first glimpse around how luxury brands will cater to young consumers in terms of design in the near future. Colorful, relaxed tailoring — not in the Saville Row way — paired with formal shoe-sneaker hybrids and a fresh take on leather goods made relevant to a younger generation through innovative hardware and prints is exactly what will get the new luxury consumer excited, especially when done by designers close to the culture. Designers without direct ties to street culture equally succeeded this season, by using fabrics, creating silhouettes and authentically partnering with aspirational brands and figures with roots in youth culture like Fendi x Porter, Dior Homme x Matthew Williams and Valentino x UNDERCOVER. The new way of working was reflected by Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli after his latest show in Paris. “I’m not going to say that streetwear is over, I don’t think so,” he told Highsnobiety. “It’s about rethinking the values of sartorialism, but with a more streetwear approach. So less effort and more relaxed. That’s the only way for me.” But while luxury brands are finally learning how to speak the language of streetwear their own way, the majority still have a lot of catching up to do when it comes to the main component that makes kids around the world line up for hours each week to buy the newest drop and the hours spent on forums and Facebook groups. For younger generations luxury no longer means exclusivity or high price-points. Instead, having access, being value-driven and buying into a tribe is what makes them tick. Without those elements, hyped clothing without any cultural credibility won’t be enough to buoy young shoppers going forward. As mentioned in Highsnobiety’s first white paper, 85 percent of those interviewed believe that what their clothes represent is just as important as its quality or design. Luxury brands need to learn how to speak through this new luxury audience, not to them. Streetwear as we knew it in past seasons isn’t necessarily streetwear anymore, yet counterculture, and its interconnected sense of dressing, will be around forever in whatever form that may take, be it hoodies today or tailoring tomorrow. And until luxury brands crack that code, step down from their ivory tower and let in the people they’re designing for, they’ll always be one step behind where youth culture is truly playing out.
  19. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    This Leonardo DiCaprio Look is Still His Best Ever, Meet the Costume Designer Behind It When crafting outfits for movies, the primary goal is to elevate the character, make their existence believable, and to make the clothing a part of a character’s persona rather than separate to it. That’s the simulated reality Hollywood costume designer Kym Barrett has dedicated the last two decades to honing, which is why she tends not to be at the forefront of a movie’s hype, no matter how memorable and iconic her designs are. But while you might not know her name, you’ve definitely seen her work. Since 1996, the Australian designer has worked on Baz Luhrmann’s Leonardo DiCaprio-starring Romeo + Juliet, The Matrix franchise, The Amazing Spider-Man, The Nice Guys, The Shallows, and Aquaman, to name just a few. And she’s just added another sure-fire hit to an already impressive resumé, creating the wardrobe for Jordan Peele‘s upcoming Get Out follow-up Us. Watch the trailer below. A psychological horror, Us tells the story of a family terrorized by their own doppelgängers. As you can see from the trailer, the film is set to deliver an epic dose of harrowing mindfuckery, diving further into personal trauma and societal issues than you likely want to go. Which is why it looks to be a must-see of 2019. We sat down with Barrett to discuss how wardrobe choices help set the tone in horror films and how she teased narrative cues into the outfits of Us‘ characters, as well as discussing the resurgence of Matrix-inspired trends and the story behind DiCaprio’s Hawaiian shirt in Romeo + Juliet. Can you explain the concept behind the wardrobe in Us, specifically how you focused on ideas around contrast and duality? I should start by talking about the broad scope of the design. I think part of the horror in the situation is the idea that anything can happen to anyone at any given time. It’s important that we believe that the characters are just like us. It’s a study in what happens when you confront these kinds of dualities. I worked with Ruth De Jong, the production designer, and of course with lighting. I wanted there to be a sense that light emerges from the darkness, and recedes into the darkness, like a kind of a heartbeat. A story heartbeat. [So] there’s a balance, a yin and yang between light and shade. From what we’ve seen in the trailers, there are quite a few narrative nods in the outfits: white rabbit prints, Howard University sweaters, the Michael Jackson Thriller T-shirt, the tuxedo top. Do you purposefully tease plot lines through the clothing? Yeah, I like to put a little spell into the clothes just so people notice some of the things that other people don’t notice. But it’s a very subconscious narrative and it’s hard because you haven’t seen the movie yet. There are plenty of references, not just from the costumes but throughout the whole movie that make it a kind of jukebox. How does wardrobe help set the tone in horror movies? Well, this is my first horror movie, so it was kind of a different approach for me. My job is to help the actors create character, and you really shouldn’t be noticing the costumes that much as you go through the story. We don’t want to bang anyone over the head about anything, so I think it’s the anticipation and the mystery of things you don’t know and you won’t know until you finish the movie. How do you feel about the resurrection of The Matrix-inspired fashion, such as long black leather coats and tiny sunglasses? Or rather, how do you feel about a look you created 20 years ago still being an inspiration for trends today? I love it that people still can connect to it. I think that part of it, too, is that the movie still resonates. The characters were from a really diverse group of cultures and they tapped into a whole other kind of world that ventured into machines taking over and the resistance. I think now that’s resonating because that’s what’s happening now. I think subconsciously that’s why people also maybe connect to it now. The story is universal and it’s a question that people have always asked. Is this all there is? Is there another reality? Is there another realm? I think that’s kind of an ancient set of questions that were framed into a more modern context and storyline. The references that I put into The Matrix were really akin to those things. Neo’s cape coat is always a good example. It’s very similar to an ancient Chinese robe and it’s also similar to a Catholic priest’s capping. And because Keanu [Reeves] looks great in it, and could move in it, and can fight in it, so therefore it gets its own identity as a sort of fashion iconography of that time. Were there symbolic references in Leonardo DiCaprio’s Romeo + Juliet shirt, too? Well, I think that you [need to] look at these other guys in Hawaiian shirts, too. Leonardo’s, in a sense, is referencing flowers at the funeral. The hope that he carries when he’s in the desert, where there’s nothing — nothing green, nothing growing — it’s a symbol [of] something better. Whereas the other guys had violence and guns mixed in [to the design]. Did you get the fabric specially made for those shirts? Yeah, we designed them. I had wonderful artists in Mexico City, which is where we shot much of the film, hand-painting. In that time, there were police on the sidewalk with machine guns and bulletproof vests. You walk through the streets and there will be a really, really rich house, and then across the street, there will be some people crouching in the corner but they’re drawing a beautiful chalk flower bouquet on the pavement with candles around it. One of the things I really love about my job is that it’s rare that I work in LA. I’m in different countries with different cultural, artistic talents. So before I finalize any design, I try to really mine the people around me and ask them to be a part of the creation process. I think that if you didn’t know I was in Mexico City, you’d still feel it.
  20. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    It's just my tastes and a guide on how i want to dress from day to day.
  21. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Ricardo Tisci for Burberry
  22. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    the god Kim Jones for Christian Dior Pre-Fall 2019
  23. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Jun Takahashi for John Undercover Joy Division
  24. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    suit of the year Engineered Garments Spring / Summer 2019 Bedford Jacket Painter Pant
  25. glorydays

    list of favorite designers

    Hardy Blechman for Maharishi Spring 2019
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