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DRUNKEN-ASSHOLE-ONER

Just thought yall should know. If you even care.

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WASHINGTON - A top intelligence official says it is time people in the United States changed their definition of privacy.

 

Privacy no longer can mean anonymity, says Donald Kerr, a deputy director of national intelligence. Instead, it should mean that government and businesses properly safeguards people's private communications and financial information.

 

Kerr's comments come as Congress is taking a second look at the Foreign Surveillance Intelligence Act.

 

Lawmakers hastily changed the 1978 law last summer to allow the government to eavesdrop inside the United States without court permission, so long as one end of the conversation was reasonably believed to be located outside the U.S.

 

The original law required a court order for any surveillance conducted on U.S. soil, to protect Americans' privacy. The White House argued that the law was obstructing intelligence gathering.

 

The most contentious issue in the new legislation is whether to shield telecommunications companies from civil lawsuits for allegedly giving the government access to people's private e-mails and phone calls without a court order between 2001 and 2007.

 

Some lawmakers, including members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, appear reluctant to grant immunity. Suits might be the only way to determine how far the government has burrowed into people's privacy without court permission.

 

The committee is expected to decide this week whether its version of the bill will protect telecommunications companies.

 

The central witness in a California lawsuit against AT&T says the government is vacuuming up billions of e-mails and phone calls as they pass through an AT&T switching station in San Francisco.

 

Mark Klein, a retired AT&T technician, helped connect a device in 2003 that he says diverted and copied onto a government supercomputer every call, e-mail, and Internet site access on AT&T lines.

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You're "right" to privacy is interferring with our domestic spying capabilities.

 

 

I'll take that away too, thank you very much.

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EVERYONE

 

BE CAREFUL OF THE PHONE COMPANIES

 

THINK ABOUT IT

 

THEY HAVE YOUR NAME

 

THEY KNOW YOUR NUMBER

 

THEY KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE

 

THEY HAVE YOUR VOICE SIGNATURE

 

AND WITH WIRELESS COMPANIES THEY CAN PINPOINT YOUR LOCATION AT ALL TIMES!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THEYRE JUST FRONT COMPANIES FOR THE NSA AND CIA

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Sure, but then Verizon told me that my lost phone could not be located via GPS when I lost that shit. The fuck it couldnt. Makes sense, so then I would have to buy another one, or pay the deductible for the phone insurance. Yet, if I murdered someone and became a suspect, my phone location could be verified at the time of the murder. Motherfuckers.

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