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Al Green

The Babble

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Guest im not witty

that bd4d. holy god blow my mind why dont you.

 

freshtastic

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i dont know if this is left field.. but i almost feel this new untitled Section.. is the Babble.. and with the most humility i wish to know if anyone else thinks it may be appropriate to name the 'Untitled' Section to.. 'The Babble'.

 

 

and also appologies for being quite MIA and not adding new content to the babble. ive been on babble sebatical... and will be home shortly.

 

also.. peep motorcycle diaries.. i saw it last night..well done.

 

-bob

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Guest im not witty

________________________________________________________

originally posted by Al Green:

 

i dont know if this is left field.. but i almost feel this new untitled Section.. is the Babble.. and with the most humility i wish to know if anyone else thinks it may be appropriate to name the 'Untitled' Section to.. 'The Babble'.

_______________________________________________________

 

 

HERE HERE!

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Guest beardo

that sounds good to me. i'll see what i can do-ske

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Guest BROWNer

this page is lacking visualsz.

i will try harder.

also..i agree with bob on the name thing..

good call aguato.

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precursor

 

http://www.robertwilson.com

 

The New York Times described Robert Wilson as "a towering figure in the world of experimental theater and an explorer in the uses of time and space onstage. Transcending theatrical convention, he draws in other performance and graphic arts, which coalesce into an integrated tapestry of images and sounds." Susan Sontag has said of Wilson's work "it has the signature of a major artistic creation. I can't think of any body of work as large or as influential." Wilson's numerous awards and honors have included The Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for lifetime achievement, the Golden Lion for Sculpture of the Venice Biennale, the National Design Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Smithsonian Institution, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

 

 

Born in Waco, Texas, Wilson was educated at the University of Texas and Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, where he took an interest in architecture and design. He studied painting with George McNeil in Paris and later worked with the architect Paolo Solari in Arizona. Moving to New York City in the mid-1960s, Wilson found himself drawn to the work of pioneering choreographers George Balanchine, Merce Cunningham, and Martha Graham, among others artists. By 1968 he had gathered a group of artists known as The Byrd Hoffman School of Byrds, and together they worked and performed in a loft building at 147 Spring Street in lower Manhattan. In 1969 two of Wilson's major productions appeared in New York City: The King of Spain at the Anderson Theater, and The Life and Times of Sigmund Freud, which premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

 

 

In 1971 Wilson received international acclaim for Deafman Glance, a silent "opera" created in collaboration with Raymond Andrews, a talented deaf-mute boy whom Wilson had adopted. After the Paris premiere of the work, French Surrealist Louis Aragon wrote of Wilson, "he is what we, from whom Surrealism was born, dreamed would come after us and go beyond us." Wilson then went on to present numerous acclaimed productions throughout the world, including the seven-day play KA MOUNTain and GUARDenia Terrace in Shiraz, Iran in 1972; The Life and Times of Joseph Stalin, a twelve-hour silent opera performed in 1973 in New York, Europe, and South America; and A Letter for Queen Victoria in Europe and New York in 1974-1975. In 1976 Wilson joined with composer Philip Glass in writing the landmark work Einstein on the Beach, which was presented at the Festival d'Avignon and at New York's Metropolitan Opera House, and has since been revived in two world tours in 1984 and 1992.

 

After Einstein Wilson worked increasingly with European theaters and opera houses. His productions were frequently featured at the Festival d'Automne in Paris, the Schaubühne in Berlin, the Thalia Theater in Hamburg, and the Salzburg Festival, among many other venues. At the Schaubühne he created Death Destruction & Detroit (1979) and Death Destruction & Detroit II (1987); and at the Thalia he presented three groundbreaking musical works, The Black Rider (1991), Alice (1992), Time Rocker (1996), and POEtry (2000).

 

 

In the early 1980's Wilson developed what still stands as his most ambitious project: the multi-national epic the the CIVIL warS: a tree is best measured when it is down. Created in collaboration with an international group of artists, Wilson planned this opera as the centerpiece of the 1984 Olympic Arts Festival in Los Angeles. Although the full epic was never seen in its entirety, individual parts have been produced in the United States, Europe and Japan.

 

 

Over the last two decades Wilson has brought his creativity to the standard dramatic and operatic repertoire. He has designed and directed operas at houses such as La Scala in Milan, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, the Opéra Bastille in Paris, the Zürich Opera, the Hamburg State Opera, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, and the Houston Grand Opera. These include Wagner's Parsifal (Hamburg, 1991), Mozart's The Magic Flute (Paris, 1991-99), Wagner's Lohengrin (Zürich, 1991; New York, 1998), Puccini's Madame Butterfly (Paris, 1993-98), and Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande (Salzburg, 1997) . He has presented innovative adaptations of works by writers such as Virginia Woolf (Orlando, 1989, 1996), Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken, 1991), and Gertrude Stein (Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights, 1992; Four Saints in Three Acts, 1996; and Saints and Singing, 1997).

 

 

Wilson has collaborated with a number of internationally acclaimed artists, writers, and musicians. He worked closely with the late German playwright Heiner Müller on the Cologne section of the CIVIL warS (1984), Hamletmachine (1986), and Quartet (1987). With singer/song-writer Tom Waits, along with writer William S. Burroughs, Wilson created the highly successful production The Black Rider : The Casting of the Magic Bullets (1991). With David Byrne, Wilson staged The Knee Plays from the CIVIL warS (1984), and later The Forest, in honor of the 750th anniversary of the city of Berlin (1988). He worked with poet Allen Ginsberg on Cosmopolitan Greetings (1988) and with performance artist Laurie Anderson on Wilson's adaptation of Euripides's Alcestis (1986). Writer Susan Sontag joined Wilson in creating Alice in Bed (1993), and together they developed a new work, Lady from the Sea (1998), performed by actress Dominique Sanda in an international tour. Wilson's long association with noted opera singer Jessye Norman began with Great Day in the Morning, presented in Paris in 1982, and will continue with a stage and video work based on the Schubert song cycle Winterreise. Recently Wilson collaborated with singer/song-writer Lou Reed on Time Rocker, which opened at Hamburg's Thalia Theater in June of 1996, and POEtry, 2000. His most recent collaboration with Tom Waits was an adaptation of Büchner's Woyzeck for Copenhagen's Betty Nansen Theater, which toured internationally.

 

 

A recipient of two Rockefeller and two Guggenheim fellowships, Wilson has been honored with numerous awards for excellence, including the Premio Abbiati from the Italian Music Critics Association, for Hanjo/Hagoromo in 1994 (awarded 1995); two Italian Premio Ubu awards (1994 and 1992) for Alice and Dr. Faustus Lights the Lights; the Golden Lion Award for Sculpture of the Venice Biennale (1993) for Memory/Loss; and the 1990 German Theater Critics Award for The Black Rider. He has been named a Lion of the Performing Arts by the New York Public Library; Texas Artist of the Year by the Art League of Houston; received an Institute Honor from The American Institute of Architects in New York City; honorary doctorates from the Pratt Institute and the California College of Arts and Crafts; an American Theatre Wing Design Award for Noteworthy Unusual Effects; a Bessie Award; an Obie Award for Direction; a Drama Desk Award for Direction; the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for lifetime achievement in 1996; the Harvard Excellence in Design Award, 1998; the 2000 award for best foreign production, Union of French Theater Critics, for Dream Play; election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2000, and the National Design Award from the Smithsonian Institution in 2001. In 1986 Wilson was the sole nominee for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama for the CIVIL warS. (no prize awarded that year).

 

 

While known for creating highly acclaimed theatrical pieces, Wilson's work is firmly rooted in the fine arts. His drawings, paintings and sculptures have been presented around the world in hundreds of solo and group showings. Major Wilson exhibitions have appeared at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1991); the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris (1991); the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston (1991); and the Instituto de Valencia de Arte Moderno (1992). Wilson has created original installations for the Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1993); London's Clink Street Vaults (1995), and the Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (1997). Most recently he created installations at the Guggenheim Museum and the Kunstindustrimuseet in Copenhagen (2000), and at the Galeries Lafayette (2002). His drawings, prints, videos and sculpture are held in private collections and museums throughout the world. He is represented by the Paula Cooper Gallery in New York City and the Thaddeus Ropac Gallery in Paris and Salzburg.

 

 

Robert Wilson's projects for 2002 include the completion of the Wagner Ring cycle at the Opernhaus Zürich, a stage version of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari in Berlin, a new staging of Janacek's Osud for the Prague National Theater, and a new production of Frau Ohne Schatten for the Paris Opera.

 

 

Each summer Robert Wilson develops new theater work at his Watermill Center, a multi-disciplinary arts laboratory located in eastern Long Island, New York. There he brings together an international group of artists in a collaborative and supportive environment. Currently work is underway to substantially renovate and expand the Center.

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please..

 

 

i dont usually have the time to post.. someone who can recommend.. a photo host please.

 

i want to share shit with yall..

 

 

be well.

 

-the village idiot.

 

 

*listen to hieruspecs...

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Guest BROWNer

i can't believe how many people are rockin'

the old tattered paper, brown, weathered collage art

steez these days. it seems to be popping up

like zits on a juice monkey.

 

hiroshima.jpg

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Guest BROWNer

here's a hollerith machine,

hollerith.jpg

invented and maintained

by Dehomag, a subsidiary of IBM during the holocaust.

this was how hitler had lists and names of jews and other

euro's marked for death. IBM to this day refuses to open

any of their european archives while maintaining they had

no knowledge or cooperation with the third reich.

for a good head fuck, read edwin black's book "IBM and

the holocaust"...cheery reading.

 

a dehomag poster from nazi germany:

poster3.jpg

translation: "see everything with hollerith punch cards"

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I've always liked the look of the propaganda posters from the WWII era.

 

those posters reminded me of THIS VIDEO.

as an added bonus it also makes some interseting points about

the 'new american century'

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I'm the sculptor who made the coins that appear further up on the page. I've been getting a lot of traffic on my website from this forum and thought I'd come see what it's all about. Don't be fooled by "nerdy robot" disclaimer... most of my recent work has been large social-political commentary...not creatures... so anyway, if you haven't already checked out my site, please do, and thanks to all who already have.

 

-Ted http://www.TedTStanke.com

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