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matching film to your conditions....(photography)

Discussion in 'Channel Zero' started by boogie hands, Sep 14, 2002.

  1. boogie hands

    boogie hands 12oz Legend

    Joined: Feb 15, 2001 Messages: 16,059 Likes Received: 13
    ok guy, last time i took photography class was in the 9th grade...needless to say some of the information has run away from me....

    i go to the yard daily with my little mid grade camera....a cannon sure shot 76, nothing super but its not bad and it gets the job done...kind of. the problem i have is the yard is situated in a way where there is always harsh light...ive been using kodak 400 speed film which supposedly is made for harsh light but when i get my photos back i get a few like this....
    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/p5acf9991885f3c71a49e4df2d3f8ee79/fd46895c.jpg'>
    this basically ruins an othewise great picture which could have looked like this....
    [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/pb31bf0c351f1107b30e8e56af144e7ba/fd496941.jpg'>
    my question is am i using the wrong film? i like to have a versitile film to use so i can catch rolling shots as well but id also like my photos to come out clear and colorful...
    are the conditions basically out of my control? do i need a better camera? could it just be walmarts film processing? any help would be appreciated...id love to experiment but im not to keen on having 24 photos come back looking worse than they did before....

    thanks ahead of time
     
  2. zen

    zen New Jack

    Joined: Sep 20, 2001 Messages: 0 Likes Received: 0
    maybe you got the iso on wrong?

    or walmarts processing is shit. they adjust all the colours in the lab so maybe they are just fucking lazy.

    oh yeah,






    first!
     
  3. boogie hands

    boogie hands 12oz Legend

    Joined: Feb 15, 2001 Messages: 16,059 Likes Received: 13
    would you mind elaborating? that term has also escaped me....
     
  4. zen

    zen New Jack

    Joined: Sep 20, 2001 Messages: 0 Likes Received: 0
    like the film you have is 400 iso (speed) so like you gotta change that setting on your camera too. thats pretty basic you prolly got that down pat. i dont know what functions your camera has either...
     
  5. boogie hands

    boogie hands 12oz Legend

    Joined: Feb 15, 2001 Messages: 16,059 Likes Received: 13
    yeah, i dont think there is anything on my camera that as to do with that....is pretty much your typical 100 dollar camera, 3 stage zoom, red eye reduction, blahblahblah....

    thanks anyway though
     
  6. zen

    zen New Jack

    Joined: Sep 20, 2001 Messages: 0 Likes Received: 0
    if it cost 100 bucks it should have it.

    but seeing as you made all that fog go away in photoshop id say walmart.
     
  7. angry xbox

    angry xbox Guest

     
  8. fr8otech

    fr8otech Senior Member

    Joined: Jul 17, 2002 Messages: 2,057 Likes Received: 0
    I don't know much either but from hearing that you have a 'point-and-click' camera I would say that maybe it's time to investing in something a little more versitile<sp>. If you had something where you could adjust the appiture<sp> and shutter speed, then you could use that large amount of light to your advantage(My spot sounds similar). I use a CANON AE-100. It's old as fuck, but it's reliable as a muthafucka. What do ya think?
     
  9. 23578

    23578 Elite Member

    Joined: Jul 2, 2000 Messages: 2,521 Likes Received: 0
    Actually the second one looks enhanced and the first one looks normal, it's an overcast day there, you're picture isn't going to come out looking like it's in direct sunlight. More often than not I'm disappointed as to how they enhance my pictures.
     
  10. I Luv Roo

    I Luv Roo Member

    Joined: Aug 20, 2001 Messages: 733 Likes Received: 0
    The lower film speed (ISO) you use, the less grainy and more saturated/colorful the pictures will come out. If you are taking photos in daylight, you don't need anything higher than 200, and 100 speed looks the crispest.

    Walmart (and equivalent) processing is okay, but it's the printing that sucks. Some camera stores have good labs where they invest a bit more time in the printing - so I usually go to those types.

    If you have point and shoot, it will figure the ISO automatically, so you only need to pay attention to your focus and your flash. Sometimes if you use a fill flash in daylight, it will even it out, making harsh shadows less harsh (like on people's faces, etc.).

    But I think your photo is blown out because you are using too high film speed, and your camera may be compensating for the darker shadows in bright sunlight, thus opening up the shutter more than it needs to, making the whole photo overexposed.
     
  11. Grow a Beard

    Grow a Beard Guest

    ok im a photo tech..............really. so when you guys get flicks developed.......wherever its at, heres what you do.

    1.find a lab whos tech are chill..........you now how to scope shit out.
    small talk. usually younger kids wont give a shit.
    2.ask them if they have a monitor they print from, if so they can control density and such. ask them when they print your roll to make it look less under/over exposed.
    3.throwaway cameras are shit. invest in a cheap zoom camera and various speeds(low speed for bright and high for low light)
    4.a flash isnt necessary for all flicks but really wont kill you to use it.
    5.also a quick addition to posting would be to pay the two to four dollars and have them make a cd of your roll. this avoids the scanning bullshit and you can doctor it up yourself in photoshop you dig?
    6. post and have fun.
     
  12. boogie hands

    boogie hands 12oz Legend

    Joined: Feb 15, 2001 Messages: 16,059 Likes Received: 13
    Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

    hahahha...look at you all upset because i snapped on you for being a fucking dork...ill do the clowing, you just hang out and be the teenage nerd that you are....

    you fucking kids are killing me here....

    and thank you I LUV ROO...ill give that a try
     
  13. my moment

    my moment Member

    Joined: Apr 23, 2002 Messages: 378 Likes Received: 0
    Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

    youre fuckin stupid. you can get good exposure with out scanning slides.
     
  14. I Luv Roo

    I Luv Roo Member

    Joined: Aug 20, 2001 Messages: 733 Likes Received: 0
    Re: Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

    No problem, Boogie... I don't know all that much - but I try to help out.
     
  15. seeking

    seeking Dirty Dozen Crew

    Joined: May 25, 2000 Messages: 32,277 Likes Received: 233
    word to big bird... you're not gonna get such oversaturated color, no matter what film you use... the second flic is blown way out. and yes, it looks good, but it looks even better than the original did. rbox's arent that orangish, and you can really tell in the redish tones of the shadows...

    ok, i just wanted to be a photoshop nerd.

    but yes, i will give a 'here here' to roo and everyone else who said shoot with 1 or 200 speed film. the lower the number, the more light it needs, thus the more 'saturated' the negative becomes.

    if you get a camera with manual settings, then we could get into some hi tech 'pushing' tricks... but again, thats just me flossing... sorry...
     
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