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boogie hands

matching film to your conditions....(photography)

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ok guy, last time i took photography class was in the 9th grade...needless to say some of the information has run away from me....

 

i go to the yard daily with my little mid grade camera....a cannon sure shot 76, nothing super but its not bad and it gets the job done...kind of. the problem i have is the yard is situated in a way where there is always harsh light...ive been using kodak 400 speed film which supposedly is made for harsh light but when i get my photos back i get a few like this....

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/p5acf9991885f3c71a49e4df2d3f8ee79/fd46895c.jpg'>

this basically ruins an othewise great picture which could have looked like this....

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/pb31bf0c351f1107b30e8e56af144e7ba/fd496941.jpg'>

my question is am i using the wrong film? i like to have a versitile film to use so i can catch rolling shots as well but id also like my photos to come out clear and colorful...

are the conditions basically out of my control? do i need a better camera? could it just be walmarts film processing? any help would be appreciated...id love to experiment but im not to keen on having 24 photos come back looking worse than they did before....

 

thanks ahead of time

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maybe you got the iso on wrong?

 

or walmarts processing is shit. they adjust all the colours in the lab so maybe they are just fucking lazy.

 

oh yeah,

 

 

 

 

 

 

first!

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like the film you have is 400 iso (speed) so like you gotta change that setting on your camera too. thats pretty basic you prolly got that down pat. i dont know what functions your camera has either...

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yeah, i dont think there is anything on my camera that as to do with that....is pretty much your typical 100 dollar camera, 3 stage zoom, red eye reduction, blahblahblah....

 

thanks anyway though

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if it cost 100 bucks it should have it.

 

but seeing as you made all that fog go away in photoshop id say walmart.

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Guest angry xbox
Originally posted by boogie hands

ok guy, last time i took photography class was in the 9th grade...needless to say some of the information has run away from me....

 

i go to the yard daily with my little mid grade camera....a cannon sure shot 76, nothing super but its not bad and it gets the job done...kind of. the problem i have is the yard is situated in a way where there is always harsh light...ive been using kodak 400 speed film which supposedly is made for harsh light but when i get my photos back i get a few like this....

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/p5acf9991885f3c71a49e4df2d3f8ee79/fd46895c.jpg'>

this basically ruins an othewise great picture which could have looked like this....

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid31/pb31bf0c351f1107b30e8e56af144e7ba/fd496941.jpg'>

my question is am i using the wrong film? i like to have a versitile film to use so i can catch rolling shots as well but id also like my photos to come out clear and colorful...

are the conditions basically out of my control? do i need a better camera? could it just be walmarts film processing? any help would be appreciated...id love to experiment but im not to keen on having 24 photos come back looking worse than they did before....

 

thanks ahead of time

 

you know nothing about photography you idiot

 

if you use slide film and a film scanner you will never have to worry about this problem

 

bwuahahahahahah

 

seriously shut up this is retarded go read a book on it

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I don't know much either but from hearing that you have a 'point-and-click' camera I would say that maybe it's time to investing in something a little more versitile<sp>. If you had something where you could adjust the appiture<sp> and shutter speed, then you could use that large amount of light to your advantage(My spot sounds similar). I use a CANON AE-100. It's old as fuck, but it's reliable as a muthafucka. What do ya think?

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Actually the second one looks enhanced and the first one looks normal, it's an overcast day there, you're picture isn't going to come out looking like it's in direct sunlight. More often than not I'm disappointed as to how they enhance my pictures.

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The lower film speed (ISO) you use, the less grainy and more saturated/colorful the pictures will come out. If you are taking photos in daylight, you don't need anything higher than 200, and 100 speed looks the crispest.

 

Walmart (and equivalent) processing is okay, but it's the printing that sucks. Some camera stores have good labs where they invest a bit more time in the printing - so I usually go to those types.

 

If you have point and shoot, it will figure the ISO automatically, so you only need to pay attention to your focus and your flash. Sometimes if you use a fill flash in daylight, it will even it out, making harsh shadows less harsh (like on people's faces, etc.).

 

But I think your photo is blown out because you are using too high film speed, and your camera may be compensating for the darker shadows in bright sunlight, thus opening up the shutter more than it needs to, making the whole photo overexposed.

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Guest Grow a Beard

ok im a photo tech..............really. so when you guys get flicks developed.......wherever its at, heres what you do.

 

1.find a lab whos tech are chill..........you now how to scope shit out.

small talk. usually younger kids wont give a shit.

2.ask them if they have a monitor they print from, if so they can control density and such. ask them when they print your roll to make it look less under/over exposed.

3.throwaway cameras are shit. invest in a cheap zoom camera and various speeds(low speed for bright and high for low light)

4.a flash isnt necessary for all flicks but really wont kill you to use it.

5.also a quick addition to posting would be to pay the two to four dollars and have them make a cd of your roll. this avoids the scanning bullshit and you can doctor it up yourself in photoshop you dig?

6. post and have fun.

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Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

 

Originally posted by angry xbox

 

you know nothing about photography you idiot

 

if you use slide film and a film scanner you will never have to worry about this problem

 

bwuahahahahahah

 

seriously shut up this is retarded go read a book on it

 

hahahha...look at you all upset because i snapped on you for being a fucking dork...ill do the clowing, you just hang out and be the teenage nerd that you are....

 

you fucking kids are killing me here....

 

and thank you I LUV ROO...ill give that a try

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Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

 

Originally posted by angry xbox

 

you know nothing about photography you idiot

 

if you use slide film and a film scanner you will never have to worry about this problem

 

bwuahahahahahah

 

seriously shut up this is retarded go read a book on it

 

youre fuckin stupid. you can get good exposure with out scanning slides.

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Re: Re: Re: matching film to your conditions....(photography)

 

Originally posted by boogie hands

 

hahahha...look at you all upset because i snapped on you for being a fucking dork...ill do the clowing, you just hang out and be the teenage nerd that you are....

 

you fucking kids are killing me here....

 

and thank you I LUV ROO...ill give that a try

 

No problem, Boogie... I don't know all that much - but I try to help out.

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Originally posted by 23578

Actually the second one looks enhanced and the first one looks normal, it's an overcast day there, you're picture isn't going to come out looking like it's in direct sunlight. More often than not I'm disappointed as to how they enhance my pictures.

 

word to big bird... you're not gonna get such oversaturated color, no matter what film you use... the second flic is blown way out. and yes, it looks good, but it looks even better than the original did. rbox's arent that orangish, and you can really tell in the redish tones of the shadows...

 

ok, i just wanted to be a photoshop nerd.

 

but yes, i will give a 'here here' to roo and everyone else who said shoot with 1 or 200 speed film. the lower the number, the more light it needs, thus the more 'saturated' the negative becomes.

 

if you get a camera with manual settings, then we could get into some hi tech 'pushing' tricks... but again, thats just me flossing... sorry...

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Yeah, if you have a manual camera, that's where you can really control how open the iris is, and you can change the shutter speed (slower to allow more light, faster to allow less light).

 

When you are in bright daylight, such as the photo above, or other train shots, you can close the iris, and your depth of field will also be much longer (ie the amount of stuff in the photo in focus is a much bigger range...NOT the 'martha stewart living' style of photography).

 

Geez... this is actually all from motion picture film knowledge, and I don't even know much about photography. I could never answer any printing or processing questions... In fact someday I should take a photo class.

 

kay, gotta eat my pho now... mmm pho....

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Guest imported_El Mamerro

Invest in a nice photo printer, get really handy with Photoshop, make a couple of frame templates to give your pictures those nice washed out print edges, and you're bling to go. Beer,

 

El Mamerro

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Use 400 speed film. 100 or 200 speed will leave you shit out of luck if it's gloomy outside or the train is moving. 400 speed gives you the versatility and quality that you're probably looking for. I'm not too familiar with the sure shot 76, but is it a 38mm-76mm zoom...? It could be the camera, it could be the developer. How many photos have turned out like this? Using a flash for taking pictures of freights is retarded, unless you just finished it late at night. It could be the paper they're using, it could be the emulsion, it could be 1000 things. If your camera is just a point and shoot zoom, try taking photos without zooming in and see if that's any better, your aperature could be messing you up. And don't listen to everyone on here about manual cameras. They're cheap, but unless you want to put some thought into every photo you take, they're worthless. That's my thoughts.

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thanks to everyone for theyre two cents....right now im using kodak 800 speed which is supposedly very versatile....ill see how the roll comes out then mabey check into a few of the other suggestions here....

 

if worse comes to worse ill just get the manual camera i have fixed....

 

god...why cant it just be overcast every day

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Originally posted by boogie hands

thanks to everyone for theyre two cents....right now im using kodak 800 speed which is supposedly very versatile....ill see how the roll comes out then mabey check into a few of the other suggestions here....

 

if worse comes to worse ill just get the manual camera i have fixed....

 

god...why cant it just be overcast every day

 

Be careful with 800 speed, you could over expose your film on a sunny day. It doesn't have to be over cast... invest in a nice point and shoot with a zoom, and your woes will be gone...

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supposedly its made for bright conditions as well....again, im pretty much experimenting here so we'll see how it goes....

 

i really might try to cut out the zoom all together and see how that goes....out of curiosity though what is the problem with a zoom lense? more light hitting the film?

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Originally posted by boogie hands

supposedly its made for bright conditions as well....again, im pretty much experimenting here so we'll see how it goes....

 

i really might try to cut out the zoom all together and see how that goes....out of curiosity though what is the problem with a zoom lense? more light hitting the film?

 

Is there a zoom on your camera??? The problem with a zoom on a camera is a large aperature, which means less light to your film, which could explain what happened in that picture. The more you zoom, the less light gets in.

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Guest SMUGGLER RSH

For years I used a manual camera my mum got back when she was studying art at university.....Shit the cmera is heavy but that gives stability and being able to adjust shutter speed, zoom, and focus is so much better than point and click cameras of which I have one now and am stuck with it until I go back to Australia. The other good thing I fin with manual cameras is what you see in the view finder is what the shot is exactly...Shit with these point and shit cameras you always miss bits on the side and such......Fuck these electronic pieces of shit

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Guest Pilau Hands
god...why cant it just be overcast every day

no...NO...they might here you!

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800 IS versatile if its not sunny out. the problem is that its also alot more grainy than a lower speed film... figure, twice as much as 400, 4 times 200, and 8x100... you can really tell the difference. if you take alot of shots at night, its good, because it needs alot less light, but its unecesary during the day.

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