Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Slyle CMC

Old Cans Of Paint, Serious Collectors

Recommended Posts

Yooo can collectors,

 

I came across a mint condition mauve flatball yesterday. it's in the most beautiful shape ive ever seen a flatball in ... like museum quality.

 

i am not really a collector and will end up using and/or abusing the can if nothing else. anyone in here want to complete their collection? i'll post a pic if anyone's interested. i'd want to barter the can for some PTx2 black.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mr. raper,

 

i'm fairly sure it's american - it doesn't have any of the warnings that i see on canadian cans. for a can of that vintage, were those present?

 

also all print on the can is english. it has the "good housekeeping seal of approval" on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the second time vintage spray paint scores like that....I think we can thank the good ole california government for this one. When they banned certain chemicals it forced store owners to pull cans from shelves and store them since they could no longer legally sell them. I am sure there is a ton of stuff sitting that people just don't know what to do with....same theory I have for chicago and when they banned the sale of paint. I am sure hoards of cans are just sitting in storage or some old stores basement waiting to be found....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished my 3 day listing spree. Time to make some room as I have allowed to many cans to pile up. I will gladly combine all auctions from the past 3 days. Please hit me up if you have any requests, look for future auctions in the coming weeks.

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/slyle133/m.html?item=330836419582&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d076323fe&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

collectors,

I recently acquired a can of rustoleum from 1973 and it has the "stops rust" drip letters on the front and the scottsman with the pipe on the front. i am just getting into collecting cans and was just curious on information and value of the can. I heard that it was a limited production can but thats all i know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traveling again. I need to get rid of my oddballs and duplicates.

Let me know if you want to buy/trade. I will even trade for user paint and pick it up anywhere in the US that I might venture.

 

here are some preview pics

TSL_2020.jpg

 

TSL_2019.jpg

 

TSL_2130.jpg

 

TSL_2172.jpg

 

TSL_2196.jpg

 

TSL_2165.jpg

 

TSL_2192.jpg

 

TSL_2211.jpg

 

TSL_2189.jpg

 

TSL_2186.jpg

 

TSL_2188.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That last flick, I found a can of Everyday Glossy Black about two months ago. I used it, and it was surprisingly good paint for what looks like a bargain brand.

 

I used to swear by those Plasti-kote Super Colors. A bargain shop called "Wild Bill's" used to have a ton of them, and every color was good. Oddball colors with good coverage, but they dried really slow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any thoughts on "freeze, thaw" of spray cans?

 

I keep my cans in the garage, which isn't well insulated. I have no basement in my home, and I don't really agree with keeping cans in the house. I feel it's a fire hazard, and probably not good for air quality.

 

The recently extremely cold weather followed by above-freezing temperatures has me wondering about how it affects the integrity of oil-based paint, old cans or otherwise. I am aware how it can affect latex paint, and oil paint is a little more durable to harsh conditions. One thing I was thinking was the condensation from freeze-thaw may cause the can to rust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its possible. If you're interested in keeping your cans as a collectable, keeping them in the garage is probably not the best idea for a variety of reasons. The most important, to me, is that you're not enjoying them. If you're concerned about safety, it might be best for you to drill a small hole in the bottom of the can and empty them out. That way you can display them without any worries and get full enjoyment out of your collection. I can't imagine a freeze/thaw cycle is ideal for their longevity, so emptying the cans might be your best option for keeping the collection intact. You can let out the gas, then seal it back up with a dab of epoxy, so the valve and paint within remains intact. Or just empty the contents entirely. I'm guessing the propellant is the real safety concern, not so much the paint. I'd expect that regular air replacing the propellant volume would turn the paint into a dense sludge at the bottom over time, and not really much of a fire hazard. I'm no expert, but I'm sure there's plenty of shit in my house I should be much more concerned with than a few old spray paint cans.

 

If you plan on releasing the propellant but saving the paint, here's my suggestion. Use a 1/8 or 1/16 drill bit and hold the can upside down after it's been shaken up well. If you can, mask off the bottom and sides of the can with some painters tape and newspaper, to avoid fucking everything up. Let it sit upside down for a few minutes so you don't get a spray of paint and goop once you puncture through, which is also why I suggest masking off the rest of the can. If you've been storing it upright, chances are you have a good layer of paint solids stuck to the bottom, no matter how much you shake it up, and some of those are gonna come flying out if the can is fully pressurized. If the paint is sitting at the opposite end of the can with no dip tube, there is no way it's going to spontaneously fly out of the can. You just might get a bit of residuals still coating the bottom, especially if you drill into the edge, which is why I suggest shaking the can thoroughly to minimize mess. I'd either choose a spot in the center, or right on the outer rim, for aesthetic purposes. Drill slowly and allow the gas to escape slowly. If the can is at full pressure, try to get the smallest possible hole and let it bleed out on its own before widening it up. I wouldn't just blast through all at once. Pretend you're speeding up the process of slow leakage over time. (ever find a can that's totally flat with a solid mass of paint sitting at the bottom? that's the idea here) Leave it upside down for at least a couple days to allow all the gas to escape. A lot of it is trapped within the liquid, like carbonation in soda, and it has a very small hole through which to escape. Trust me, the paint inside isn't going to solidify on you in a couple days. After you feel like the gas is fully gone, dab a tiny bit of epoxy over the hole. If the epoxy bubbles out, there's positive pressure in the can and gas is still escaping. Maybe while it's sitting you can periodically cover the hole and shake it a little until there is no positive internal pressure. Alternately, you can drill two tiny holes and blow air through one to replace the gas volume with air. Once the epoxy cures, you should be good to go with displaying your collection. I'd expect that within a year, all the paint is going to congeal as a solid mass at the bottom.

 

I've lost a few pristine, treasured cans to leakage, so emptying the contents may not be such a bad idea for preservation. My paint was once displayed in a "stadium seating" tiered arrangement, and one of the cans in the back (70's Rusto Chestnut Brown) developed a pinhole leak, and slowly dripped black goo all over the three in front of it. Now I have three beautiful, paper label Wet Paint cans that are permanently stuck together with black goo all over the back. I've also had a valve slowly fail (80's Krylon Mauve) and had similar gooey crap slowly leak out of the top, onto the shelf, and all over a wood floor. It leaked down the back of the shelf, so my wife and I got a nice surprise when we were moving out of that apartment. Both times I could vaguely smell paint in that room for a couple days, but had no idea where it was coming from until it was too late.

 

If the idea is to save the cans for posterity or enjoyment, then you're not doing yourself any favors by keeping them in an uninsulated garage where they're more likely to deteriorate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register for a 12ozProphet forum account or sign in to comment

You need to be a forum member in order to comment. Forum accounts are separate from shop accounts.

Create an account

Register to become a 12ozProphet forum member.

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×