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Bloc131

camera question

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what does the yellow filter do?

 

 

 

i have a super8 movie camera with high speed b&w film in it. there is a yellow filter in my camera bag. how can this help? will it block out some of the light so it won't be exposed as much?

 

 

i'm a camera tard.

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yellow filters are usually said to 'reduce haze'... this is really only true for b/w photography because if used w/ color it actually intensifies greens and blues giving everything a 'super-saturated' look...

 

it's a cool filter but it won't really affect exposure or anything...

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thanks smart.

 

 

i'll be shooting with a super8 camera. higher speed b&w film. think it'd help to have the filter?

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I think it would help if you are shooting outside, it will kind of 'crisp up' the image. You won't need it if you're shooting indoors though, it's mainly for use in actual sunlight...

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thanks smart. i really appreciate it. i was always wondering what it was for. and i dont have anyone to ask. i'll let you know how it turns out!

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Guest -sudz-

bloc man, where'd you get your film?? i have an old brownie 8 and i cant find anything.

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Guest

let me drop the science....

 

Colour Temperature

 

Outdoor light is blue and indoor light is orange.

(unless you're using fancy 'blue' lights or 'green' flourecent tubes).

The whole point is that your film will match the colour space from

one shot to another. I'd say dont use the filter indoors but then use

it outdoors. The alternate is to not use the filter outdoors and then

use blue gels over the indoor lights. That's probably not an option.

 

there ya go.

 

film nerd onerski.

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i ordered from : http://www.yalefilmandvideo.com. they're a store in hollywood, california but they shipped to me and i'm a few hours north of them.

 

call them and ask if you could order from them. i looked around a bit and they had what i wanted at a reasonable price. perhaps they have what you need and could send it to you. i just mailed them a money order.

 

word to the wise - don't get express order. it's a ripoff and i found out the hard way. long story, but it wasnt yalefilmandvideo's fault.

 

hope that helps. ask me if you have any more questions.

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more nerdski...

 

all filters will reduce your exposure by a little bit.

Gels on lights will also lower the 'candle power'.

Your filter will probably lower the light by a quater stop,

so you dont really need to worry about opening up

the exposure unless you're shooting in a very dark place.

But seing as we've established that the filter is for outdoors...

it should always be bright enough.

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