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This Old Trap House: Wonk Saggin Edition


mr.yuck
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Dearest @Mercer,

 

I hope this message finds you well. I have been searching the internet high and low for a specific wiring diagram and was hoping you could help me out. I have a light at the bottom of the staircase and a light at the top. 

 

Im am trying to figure out how to run the wiring so that the switch downstairs controls both lights. A switch upstairs that controls both light. A second switch upstairs that controls only the upstairs light.

 

Thank you for your consideration in this matter.

 

Yours truely,

Mr.Yuck

Vice President and client

 

 

 

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39 minutes ago, mr.yuck said:

Dearest @Mercer,

 

I hope this message finds you well. I have been searching the internet high and low for a specific wiring diagram and was hoping you could help me out. I have a light at the bottom of the staircase and a light at the top. 

 

Im am trying to figure out how to run the wiring so that the switch downstairs controls both lights. A switch upstairs that controls both light. A second switch upstairs that controls only the upstairs light.

 

Thank you for your consideration in this matter.

 

Yours truely,

Mr.Yuck

Vice President and client

 

 

 

 

 

You'll need to purchase a couple of "two way switches" to pull this off. Unlike a normal on/off switch that closes the circuit up when you flip it up (thus turning on the lights), and opens the circuit when you flip it down (thus turning them off) a two way switch is a little more complex.

 

A two way (AKA 3 way) switch has a common terminal, a line one, and a line two.

 

When you flip the switch one way, it closes the circuit between common and line 1, when you flip it the other way it opens up line 1, and closes the circuit between common, and line 2.

 

So you're not really opening and closing a single circuit like on a normal switch. Instead you're deciding if the hot is being sent out to line 1, or line 2 by flipping the switch.

 

1. Run your neutral directly to the light like you would normally.

2. Take the hot wire coming from your panel, and you put it in the common of one of the switches

3. Connect line 1 from your first switch, to line 2 of the second switch.

4. Connect line 2 from your first switch, to line 1 of your second switch.

5. Connect the common from the second switch to the light.

 

Had to edit for clarity.

Edited by Mercer
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40 minutes ago, mr.yuck said:

Nevermind. I think you explained it.

 

No, I mistakenly thought you were asking about two switches to operate one single light circuit. This time I actually read your question properly. Now we're getting complex.

  1. Run your neutral directly to the light like you would normally.
  2. Take the hot wire coming from your panel, and you put it in the common of the downstairs switch
  3. Also run that same hot from the panel to the line 1 on your "upstairs only" switch
  4. Connect line 1 from your downstairs switch, to line 2 of the upstairs "all lights" switch.
  5. Connect line 2 from your downstairs switch, to line 1 of the upstairs "all lights" switch.
  6. Now connect the common from the upstairs "all lights" switch, to your downstairs lights
  7. Also connect that common to your 3rd "upstairs only" switch's line 2
  8. Now connect that 3rd "upstairs only's" common to the upstairs lights
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Oof, it's been a while, and that might not work the way you want it to. That would make it so that you can turn on/off all the lights using the two "all lights" switches, but if you had that second light switch just for the upstairs lights flipped onto hot, you wouldn't be able to turn it off from downstairs. I honestly would need to draw a diagram to figure this out.

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Word. I appreciate all your help @Mercer. I know it doesnt feel like it but Im trying to simplify what was there originally. There were an additional 3 lines that jumped off that upstairs hall light powering other stuff. Outlet circuits were mixed in with lighting circuits. The 40s was wildin.

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Yes. I have updated drawing. This is upstairs. Switch to the right, wires and light no longer exist. Were removed for demo.

 

Switch on the left has wires and works the light downstairs. There is another black mystery 3 wire that has no current running through it. Its not hooked to anything right now.

 

20210413_211645.thumb.jpg.4ff3b35d1e1ec0da7844b3a242d8171e.jpg20210413_211338.thumb.jpg.67e773743f6a64c6449645e89d1532d2.jpg

 

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Wooooo. Brain straight smokin lookin at all these diagrams.

 

@Mercershould I just tear out the ceiling downstairs tomorrow so I can trace all of these existing lines? Its like everything in this joint was run with 3 wire to jump constant power to another location in the house.

 

wiring-4-way-switch-multiple-lights.gif.071d835aa70266a1f8e037763fe146c4.gif

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Yea, that sounds dangerous AF @Dirty_habiT. You could mitigate some of that safety issue by shutting off your disconnect, or removing your meter first, but even then that isn't how you want power your entire house. It might work in an absolute emergency but def isn't worth it.

 

If you can't install a solar/battery setup, the next best thing is a dual fuel (natural gas/propane) generator installed by a licensed electrician. Next best is a generator with extension cords to the fridge/furnace etc. I'd still go with propane for a fuel source because it's safer for your lungs, and safer/more reliable to store longer term as a fuel for as long as your tank(s) stored are outside. Keep in mind, during a shit hit's the fan situation all petroleum based fuels are extremely prone to supply chain issues. Your best bet is a solar/battery system, unless you have a reliable source a bio fuel and the means to produce your own diesel.

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Nice info.  It is as I thought. Extremely dangerous. Oh yeah no shit. Isn't that cord called a suicide plug or dead mans plug or something?
 

I'm really interested in diesel generator in combination with just about every other form of energy generation and storage including solar.

 

I want to use closed loop steam in a pressurized vessel/solar radiator to turn a turbine when a valve is opened. 

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