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misteraven

Recipes - Cooking and Baking with 12oz Best of thread

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Though culinary arts (Home Ec) is still largely offered in high school and despite the ability to cook being a life skill, it's amazing to see how few people really know how to cook / bake. Granted, as a kid I had pretty limited tastes, had a mom that was always whipping stuff up (whether you were hungry or not) and had no interest in the subject, I've definitely found myself appreciating it more as an adult. When living in NYC, it was tough to get into since it was (ironically) often more expensive to shop and cook a meal at home than even a decent restaurant. Out where I live now, quality meat is crazy cheap as are most produce and groceries. Still can be a little costly when you have to shop for a ton of ingredients, especially when so often they end up being stuff that are on the higher end of costly, while also being stuff you probably won't use regularly.

 

Anyhow, there's definitely a tradition here on 12oz when it comes to cooking, with a thread started by @Are2called Cooking with 12oz  kicked off way back in 2002 (18 freakin years ago!) and more recently an awesome thread by @Mercerkicked off last year called Home Made Food Flex Off. Continuing in Mercer's tradition there and what I've been trying to do with a lot of my threads on the new 12ozProphet forum is see if we can open minds and elevate our respective quality of life. It's a shame how in the USA, we largely over look the importance of a fine meal... We invented the concept of fast food and are willing to call shit like McDonald's a 'meal'. As a culture, we've largely lost the ritual of striving to create amazing cuisine and savoring meals and the celebration that comes with breaking bread with friends and family. 

 

This thread is for the purposes of reintroducing the subject of cooking to the people here, so I hope you guys help me share notable recipes you've come across. If you're just flexing a fine home made meal you cooked, than please continue on to the Home Made Food Flex Off thread. This thread is specifically to share recipes (though if you make any of them, feel free to follow up with photos), with a specific lean on simplicity without compromising quality. It can be as simple as a pasta sauce recipe or as sophisticated as a rack of lamb, but please keep this in the spirit of quality recipe's that are also manageable.

 

----------------------------

 

In that spirit, I'm going to start with a simple recipe for home made bagels...

 

This is both inspired by a friend in Germany I follow, as well as some conversations with Mercer about the underground bread dough circuit he came across out in NYC. He was also out my way recently and brought bagels with him from NYC, which is something I really miss. Likewise, I have a friend that owns a coffee shop in Soho called Ground Support Cafe that has also been getting into artesian bread baking, so seems to be gaining traction. Unfortunately I started on a strict Keto diet at the beginning of the year, so can't partake in this particular recipe until I allow for cheat days. No reason you guys can't enjoy it, so here goes...

 

Link to full recipe and instructions: https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/homemade-bagels/

 

Crazy simple, its literally just:

 

  1. Warm Water: Liquid for the dough.
  2. Yeast: Allows the dough to rise. I recommend an instant or active dry yeast.
  3. Bread Flour: A high protein flour is necessary for bagels. We want a dense and chewy texture, not soft and airy like cinnamon rolls. Bread flour is the only solution!
  4. Brown Sugar: Bakeries use barley malt syrup to sweeten the bagel dough– it can be a little difficult to find, but brown sugar is a fine substitute.
  5. Salt: Flavor.

 

----------------------------

 

Homemade Bagels Recipe

 

Ingredients

  • 1 and 1/2 cups (360ml) warm water (between 100-110°F, 38-43°C)
  • 2 and 3/4 teaspoons instant or active dry yeast*
  • 4 cups (480g) bread flour (spoon & leveled), plus more for work surface and hands*
  • 1 Tablespoon packed light or dark brown sugar (or barley malt syrup)*
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • coating the bowl: nonstick spray or 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • egg wash: 1 egg white beaten with 1 Tablespoon water

 

For Boiling

  • 2 quarts water
  • 1/4 cup (60g) honey (or barley malt syrup)*

 

Instructions

  1. Prepare the dough: Whisk the warm water and yeast together in the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment. Cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the flour, brown sugar, and salt. Beat on low speed for 2 minutes. The dough is very stiff and will look somewhat dry.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. With lightly floured hands, knead the dough for 4-5 minutes. The dough is too heavy for the mixer to knead it!
  4. Lightly grease a large bowl with oil or nonstick spray. Place the dough in the bowl, turning it to coat all sides in the oil. Cover the bowl with aluminum foil, plastic wrap, or a clean kitchen towel.  Allow the dough to rise at room temperature for 60-90 minutes or until double in size.
  5. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.
  6. Shape the bagels: When the dough is ready, punch it down to release any air bubbles. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces. (Just eyeball it– doesn’t need to be perfect!) Shape each piece into a ball. Press your index finger through the center of each ball to make a hole about 1.5 – 2 inches in diameter. Watch video above for a visual. Loosely cover the shaped bagels with kitchen towel and rest for a few minutes as you prepare the water bath.
  7. Preheat oven to 425°F (218°C).
  8. Water bath: Fill a large, wide pot with 2 quarts of water. Whisk in the honey. Bring water to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-high. Drop bagels in, 2-4 at a time, making sure they have enough room to float around. Cook the bagels for 1 minute on each side.
  9. Using a pastry brush, brush the egg wash on top and around the sides of each bagel. Place 4 bagels onto each lined baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through. You want the bagels to be a dark golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow bagels to cool on the baking sheets for 20 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
  10. Slice, toast, top, whatever you want! Cover leftover bagels tightly and store at room temperature for a few days or in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

 

Notes

  1. Overnight Make Ahead Instructions: Prepare the dough through step 4, but allow the dough to rise overnight in the refrigerator. The slow rise gives the bagels wonderful flavor! In the morning, remove the dough from the refrigerator and let the dough rise for 45 minutes at room temperature. Continue with step 5. I don’t recommend shaping the bagels the night before as they may puff up too much overnight.
  2. Freezing Make Ahead Instructions: Baked bagels freeze wonderfully! Freeze them for up to 3 months, thaw overnight in the refrigerator or at room temperature, then warm to your liking. You can also freeze the bagel dough. After punching down the dough in step 6, wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap, then a layer of aluminum foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator, then punch the dough down again to release any air bubbles. Continue with the rest of step 6.
  3. Special Tools: stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment, large baking sheets (I love these), big pot (I use my 5.5 quart dutch oven), pastry brush.
  4. Yeast: Use instant or active dry yeast. If using active dry yeast, the rise time may be up to 2 hours. 1 standard packet is about 2 and 1/4 teaspoons, so you will need a little more than 1 packet of yeast. Reference my Baking with Yeast Guide for answers to common yeast FAQs.
  5. Bread Flour: Bagels require a high protein flour. Bread flour is a must. Here are all my recipes using bread flour if you want more recipes to use it up!
  6. Barley Malt Syrup: This ingredient can be a little hard to find, but truly gives bagels that traditional malty flavor we all know and love. Most natural food stores carry it. I offer alternatives such as brown sugar in the dough and honey in the water bath; I’ve made bagels with these alternatives AND with barley malt syrup and honestly love both versions.
  7. Bread Machine: Place the dough ingredients into the pan of the machine. Program the machine to dough or manual, then start. After 9-10 minutes, the dough will be quite stiff. Allow the machine to complete its cycle, then continue with the recipe.
  8. By Hand: If you do not have a mixer, you can mix the dough together in a large bowl then knead by hand for 10-15 minutes.
  9. Bagel Varieties: See blog post above for various add-ins and toppings. Note that the toppings are added after the egg wash in step 9. Some readers have used this bagel recipe to make whole wheat bagels by replacing half of the bread flour with whole wheat flour. I haven’t tried it, but let me know if you do!

 

bagels-recipe-2.jpg

 

homemade-bagels-2.jpg

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I got a feeling the first post in this thread is going to come in super handy once I relocate. I have a once a week addiction to salt, or everything bagels. Didn't know you could make these without a fancy steamer or something.

 

I'm not sure I can contribute too much as my wife is the one who cooks most of the stuff I post in the food flex thread. I just post the photos, and enjoy the propers and a good meal. I do have a few things I cook well but there's really not that much to them.

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6 minutes ago, Mercer said:

I got a feeling the first post in this thread is going to come in super handy once I relocate. I have a once a week addiction to salt, or everything bagels. Didn't know you could make these without a fancy steamer or something.

 

I'm not sure I can contribute too much as my wife is the one who cooks most of the stuff I post in the food flex thread. I just post the photos, and enjoy the propers and a good meal. I do have a few things I cook well but there's really not that much to them.

No reason you can't post one of her recipe's if she's okay with it.

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Right at the top, I'm going to post how much of a game changer it is to have a GOOD chef's knife in your kitchen.

 

https://www.zwilling.com/us/miyabi-koh-8-inch-chefs-knife-33951-200/33951-200-0.html?cgid=our-brands_miyabi_cutlery_koh-400fc#start=3

 

This is the knife I have.  You HAVE to take care of it.  The blade can be chipped if you drop it.  It will stick right into concrete, linoleum, your foot, your leg, etc if you let it drop point down.  It can cut right through chicken bone, no problem.  You have to sharpen a good knife prior to use and you must store it properly, and it never goes in the dish washer.

 

I highly recommend that anyone interested in cooking get a GOOD knife.  Get spendy on it, save up in a jar if you have to, there is no rival for a good knife vs. an "ok" one in the kitchen.

 

The most amazing thing to me when I first got it is how easy it is to cut think slices of anything.  A dull knife tries to squish what you're cutting before it starts cutting it.  A good sharp high quality knife will go through just about anything as if it were warm butter using only the weight of the knife.  No force needed, your hand is only a guide for where the knife needs to go make a cut.  No sawing motions necessary.

 

edit: adding my migas recipe I posted in the other thread.

 

  • dice 1/4 of a fresh onion and finely chop 1 fresh garlic clove.
  • saute onion in 1/2 tablespoon butter until translucent, then add garlic and saute until fragrant.
  • add between 1/2 and 1 FRESH thin sliced jalapeno (if you want the HOT ones use the ones w/ thin vertical "bark" looking lines in them, you may have to dig at the store to find these but they'll be in the same bin as all the pussy jalapenos).
  • add freshly cooked bacon crumbles (we ONLY use Wright's brand in my house because.... well because it's the fucking best period the end)
  • stir ingredients around but do not over cook, then pile in the center of the pan.
  • crack however many eggs you need to stick it all together right on top of the ingredients in the pan.
  • "scramble" the eggs, but not too much..... this is key to getting that partially yellow/partially white "kinda fried egg" consistency that is good in tacos.  Also, watch the heat here, not too high or you'll over cook the eggs into rubber, shut the heat off just before the eggs are "cooked" in your opinion, they will continue to cook a bit anyway (DHABZ doesn't do over easy or slimy eggs at all so this method is "fine").
  • add crumbled tortilla chips, I suggest lightly salted.  This is not the "right" way to make migas, but the right way involves making your own corn tortillas which is an ordeal in itself.  Chips work fine, but don't add them until the end or else they'll absorb a lot of moisture and get soggy.
  • warm tortillas on a separate pan.  If you're using tortillas at room temp you're an animal and don't bother with trying to make good tacos.
  • Tillamook brand shredded cheddar because it's the best IMO (Mexican blend)
  • top w/ salsa/taco sauce of your choice.  This is what I used on the ones in the picture: https://yellowbirdsauce.com/product/serrano-condiment-9-oz/
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Fuck yes.  My kid wants an old fashioned recipe book with pages including shit I make and family recipes.  I don’t have family or family recipes so her book will be full of shit I cook plus 12 oz chefs.  

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EBA43245-DAFC-4EB1-AC27-748752E02DBE.jpeg

 

Mixing the above into 1 to 2 pounds of ground beef doesn't suck.  It's my go to taco seasoning now for years and years.  I, however, cannot take credit because I got it from Alton Brown.  I still thought I should share so that you guys can eat good ground beef tacos too.

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DA0FE300-B891-4312-910A-D6FBE28FB1D8.jpeg

 

Michocoan style carnitas in the pressure cooker (done in about 40 minutes total):

 

Carnitas are like pulled pork for tacos.  The ingredient list above (don't add cat hair as can be seen stuck to my list) is for the dry rub.

 

  • 1 to 2lb pork shoulder.  Don't choose some other type of pork for this.  It has to be pork shoulder or you'll fuck up the fat content.
  • Lightly trim some of the fat off the pork shoulder, but leave a lot too.  Just cut off any crazy looking shit.
  • Cube the shoulder into 1 to 2 inch cubes.  Kinda small but not too small.
  • Cover in dry rub.  The large onion has to be diced FINE.  You don't want large pieces of onion, when you think it's fine enough, dice it like 4 more passes and that's probably fine enough.  This will take a while to do but the results will be worth it.
  • Put the cubed, dry rubbed pork into the fridge in a bowl covered for a few hours.  You can leave it overnight if you want.
  • Place 2 tablespoons of oil in a pan and turn the heat onto high.
  • Sear the cubed pork on all sides.  Do this in batches, not too many at a time.  You want them to not be cooked, but sealed up.  This is going to add a lot of flavor if you get the sear just right.  Place the seared pieces into the pressure cooker.
  • After all the seared pieces are in the pressure cooker, add enough water to almost cover the pork.  You can also use a can of low sodium chicken or beef broth if you desire but I usually just use water.
  • Cover the pressure cooker and put it on high pressure setting.  I don't use an instant pot so if that's what you have then you have to figure out your own settings.  Turn the heat on your stove to high until the pressure in the cooker is high.
  • Once the pressure cooker is on high pressure/steam coming out of the vent, set a timer for 20 minutes and reduce the heat to low but not so low that the vent stops venting steam.  You may have to play with this for a minute until it's right but you want the heat to be on as low as you can get it while still maintaining pressure.
  • Once the timer goes off, fast release the pressure.
  • Drain the liquid into a sauce pan and simmer it on low heat until it reduces.  This is going to be your sauce.
  • With the pork removed into a bowl, start breaking it up using two forks.  It will shred very easily.  I don't go nuts on doing this, I just break it up a little bit but still leave some big chunks in there.
  • When you're ready to serve the pork, put some oil in the pan and fry it for a minute to add some crispiness to it.  It shouldn't take long and you shouldn't need to add any seasoning to it.

 

Serve this on hot tortillas.  I use flour tortillas mainly just because they don't fall apart very easily but traditional is probably going to be corn tortillas.  On your tacos you will want to put some finely chopped fresh onion, cilantro leaves chipped coarse (remove the stems, never eat cilantro stems and question any restaurant that has stems in their cilantro), and some julienned carrots (like match stick size).

 

As an added bonus, you can make DHABZ's top sekrit chile toreados:

  • Acquire fresh jalapenos.  Again, get the ones with the brown bark lines if you want to put some hair on your chest/toes.
  • Go into your garage and get your mapp gas torch.  You can use propane if you want, but mapp gas works much faster.
  • Get a pair of all metal tongs and an oven mitt to hold them with.
  • Get a large gallon ziplock opened up and fold the zipper portion cuffed over to the outside, this will prevent you from boogering up the zipper as you add contents to the bag.
  • Using the tongs, the mitt, and the torch.... hold each pepper and charr the shit out of the outside.  You don't have to go ham here, just  turn it black/burnt and immediately place it in the plastic bag.
  • Do this for about 5 or so peppers, leaving them whole and burnt in the bag.  Be careful that they are not still so hot that they melt the bag.
  • Close the bag and wait five minutes.
  • Remove the peppers and "rub" the black burnt skin off of them.  You can rinse them under the cold water faucet as you do this.  They should just look like porous fleshy jalapenos at this point with no shininess to them any more.  They should still feel stiff like fresh jalapenos do too.
  • Slice them as thin as you like, I usually slice mine kinda thicker for this than if I were just putting fresh jalapeno slices on something.
  • Add the sliced pieces into a pan and douse with soy sauce/liquid aminos (bragg brand).
  • Saute them for a few minutes until they soften and take on a darker color of the soy sauce/liquid aminos.
  • Remove from heat and use as garnish, you should have no liquid left at this point, but do it on low heat so you don't burn the soy sauce, you just want it to evaporate and absorb into the jalapenos.

 

The whole reason for the torch part is because the waxy skin of the jalapenos is a protective layer against things getting in.  This will prevent the jalapenos from soaking up the soy sauce as much.  It's a night/day difference if you have removed this skin vs. not removing it.  This is also a good tip for preparing your own jalapeno poppers (I'll post how I make those at some point in the future).  The batter that you put on jalapeno poppers is notorious for flaking off and not sticking to the pepper.  Removing the waxy skin will let the batter stick a WHOLE lot better.

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My paella recipe 🥘 have done this one a handful of times and it’s always a hit

 

Need a paella pan
As much of these ingredients as you want

add to pan in order below

dont go cheap on the saffron 

paella specific rice needed, one small bag

el paellero spice pack is easiest

 

 

DO NOT STIR

 

 

 

 

57AE4BF4-3618-4191-A95B-A0F67734A396.jpeg

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I'm just sitting here wondering if you guys are eating cereal and popeyes chicken sandwiches for every meal.  There should be more posts in this thread.

 

D439CAC1-7C75-4EB2-997A-6708DB8A8AB8.jpeg

 

Home made beef/cheese taquitos:

 

  • vegetable oil in a non stick pan
  • uncooked/fresh corn tortillas in pan until sizzling a bit.
  • flip the tortilla and put taco meat (recipe in a post above this one) on it, not too much or you'll fuck it up.
  • if you don't let the tortilla warm up enough and start to cook before you fuck with it, you're going to fuck it up and tear it.
  • a little cheese on top of that.  I use, again Tillamook brand Mexican shredded blend.
  • chopped a canned chile toreado and put that in the first one too.
  • using tongs lift the sides of the tortilla to give that meat in the middle a big hug.
  • using tongs hold the taquito together while it continues to cook.... after a minute it shouldn't want to return to it's flat shape.
  • cook to desired doneness, don't over cook/burn.

 

You're welcome for adding some culture into your life.  Stop eating all that white people shit all the time.  Next I'm going to show you all how I make tofu spring rolls w/ homemade peanut butter sauce.

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This recipe was passed to me, think it's Vietnamese in origin.  Super easy with a lot of flavor.

 

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I like to use ground spices for this, feel it disperses more and you have no solids to remove after as I leave the ginger slices in the pot.  You can add a bit more chili paste if you like hotter.  Rather than cooking the noodles separately I like to cook them in the broth in the last 10 minutes of cooking then scoop the noodles out, divide among bowls and continue to assemble.  If you don't have Asian noodles egg noodles work just as well here.  Since this uses stew meat I'd recommend cooking for at least 2 hours.  And you read right, just throw it in the pot, no need to brown it first.

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On 1/25/2020 at 6:08 AM, Dirty_habiT said:

I'm just sitting here wondering if you guys are eating cereal and popeyes chicken sandwiches for every meal.  There should be more posts in this thread.

 

I'm always too embarrassed at the food I make. years ago I was all about cooking all manner of stuff and devoting hours to it.

 

 but my kids can be motherfuckers to cook for so now we on the kids loop

 

 recently scored a win with Jamaican Rice and peas.

 

Kids loved that stuff. we made a basic jerk chicken marinade that went on chicken drumsticks and they went on BBQ but kids didn't touch them

 

 

 

400g can kidney beans

, rinsed and drained
400ml can low-fat coconut milk

½ tsp dried thyme

½ tsp ground allspice
6 spring onions

, sliced
200g long grain rice

 

Put the beans, coconut milk, thyme, allspice, 4 of the spring onions and 100ml water in a pan, and bring to a simmer. Season with plenty of salt and black pepper.

Rinse the rice a few times in a sieve until the water runs clear. Tip into the pan and simmer for 10 mins over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, before lowering the heat. Put the lid on and cook for another 5 mins until the grains are tender and the liquid has been absorbed. Fluff up the rice with a fork before serving and scatter with the reserved spring onions. 

 

Rice an peas kiss ya lips an tings

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I snack. A lot. 
here’s a current fav

 

Pretty simple. Scoop a spoon Full of PB (or whatever kind of butter) 

arranged slices  of apples. 
drizzle honey. 
sprinkle cinnamon. 
I usually crush up pecans. If I was out when I made this one so I crushed some cereal and sprinkled on top. For crunch. 6F32DDE5-79B0-478E-A8CD-1A4445850095.thumb.png.d1f78b3c2828fff1866187552e64c5d5.png

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On 1/29/2020 at 10:26 PM, Schnitzel said:

I'm always too embarrassed at the food I make. years ago I was all about cooking all manner of stuff and devoting hours to it.

 

 but my kids can be motherfuckers to cook for so now we on the kids loop

 

 recently scored a win with Jamaican Rice and peas.

 

Kids loved that stuff. we made a basic jerk chicken marinade that went on chicken drumsticks and they went on BBQ but kids didn't touch them

 

 

 

400g can kidney beans

, rinsed and drained
400ml can low-fat coconut milk

½ tsp dried thyme

½ tsp ground allspice
6 spring onions

, sliced
200g long grain rice

 

Put the beans, coconut milk, thyme, allspice, 4 of the spring onions and 100ml water in a pan, and bring to a simmer. Season with plenty of salt and black pepper.

Rinse the rice a few times in a sieve until the water runs clear. Tip into the pan and simmer for 10 mins over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, before lowering the heat. Put the lid on and cook for another 5 mins until the grains are tender and the liquid has been absorbed. Fluff up the rice with a fork before serving and scatter with the reserved spring onions. 

 

Rice an peas kiss ya lips an tings

 recipe also calls for a scotch bonnet pepper but obviously with a 3 and a 6 year old I'm not including that bad boy.

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On 1/28/2020 at 11:33 PM, NightmareOnElmStreet said:

Who got the ramen drop....? I’ve tried.

and failed.

I don't ramen so much but I have done different noodle dishes w/ the proper add ons like soy sauce or tea eggs, bok choy, etc.  Not exact, but pretty similar vein if that would help.

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I'll try to keep this one real simple. With a couple options.

 

Meatballs:

 

1lb of beef (or a combination of pork, veal etc equaling 1lb) 

1.5 tsp Salt

3/4 tsp Pepper

Garlic

1/2 cup Panko bread crumbs

1 egg

3 tbsp milk

-----------

Let's start. All of your pots for pasta should have water simmering ready to bring to a boil. Oven heated to 375* or so. Mise en plas all your ingredients have all your utensils out.

 

 

Saute a very small bit of garlic, fine diced, in butter, maybe half a clove. Set aside IN the butter to cool off. Or use a very small sprinkle of garlic powder (later on the meat). You can use the same pan you'll heat up the sauce in for this.

 

Salt the meat, probably a tsp and a half (I eye ball this. I just sprinkle a decent coating across the surface of the meat. But dont be afraid to salt it.)

 

Pepper in a similar fashion but roughly 50% less than the salt.

 

Add your cooked garlic and butter, or sprinkle the garlic powder

 

Mix all the meat well, wash your hands

 

In a small ramekin or cup whatever, add the egg and whisk. Add the bread crumbs and milk and combine quickly and add into meat. Combine well.

 

Form golf balls and place on parchment lined baking sheet. 

 

Turn (pre-heated) oven to broil, have the rack closer to the top and toss them in.

 

Sorry for the blurry picture.

 

Now grab your favorite store bought sauce (I'll give yall my slow cooked Dutch oven sauce recipe later) and get it up to a simmer in the low walled sauce pan or a big skillet whatever.

 

They'll probably broil about 10-12 mins to get to that point in the picture.

 

Take em out when they're nice and brown on top I mean crispy boys. And toss em right into simmering sauce.

 

You're done!

 

Let em simmer while you boil some pasta.

 

Drain pasta, add a couple big spoonfuls of sauce to the pasta pot that's now empty and dry. Add about 3 tbps of butter. Return to a low burner (which should still be pretty hot if you're working fast) let the sauce melt the butter mix well and toss the drained pasta in.  Toss to coat.

 

Serve in a bowl topped with fresh parmesan and chiffonade basil. Picture for example.

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This ones even easier.

 

BBQ beef I make for pot lucks.

 

Buy a large roast I like chuck cause it has some good fat. Salt and pepper well.

 

Get some coals going on the grill in an offset fire style, throw a piece of oak on top and get a hot ass fire. Set the grate low and sear the roast. Set it to the less hit side and choke the chimney. Let it smoke for 20 mins.

 

While its smoking add about a cup and a half of water and 1 cup of your face bbq sauce to a slow cooker on high.

 

Remove from grill and add to hot braising liquid.

 

Turn slow cooker to low and simmer for 4 hours or so.

 

Chop the beef up and return to the braising liquid and combine.

 

Serve on kings Hawaiian rolls with pickles or pineapple or pickled pineapple.

 

Slainte 

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13 minutes ago, Schnitzel said:

Looks delicious!

Thanks bro, tried to make it as simple as possible in the way I do it. This meal is usually done within 30 mins for me which is a huge bonus.

 

Somebody quote bump that beef recipe to the top of this page. Just played myself posting em back to back haha

Edited by pissdrunkwhat?!

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