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dosoner

Einstein's "Credo"

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the following speech by albert einstein to the ferman League of human rights, appears in the appendix of EINSTEIN by michael mhite and john gribbin, dutton, penguin books usa anc., new york, 1994, p. 262:

 

"Our situation on this earth seems strange. Every one of us appears here involuntarily and uninvited for a short stay, without knowing the whys and the wherefore. In our daily lives we only feel that man is here for the sake of others, for those whom we love and for many other beings whose fate is connected with our own. I am often worried at the thought that my life is based to such a large extent on the work of my fellow human beings and I am aware of my great indebtedness to them. I do not believe in freedom of the will. Schopenhauer's words: 'Man can do what he wants, but he cannot will what he wills' accompany me in all situations throughout my life and reconcile me with the actions of others even if they are rather painful to me. This awareness of the lack of freedom of will preserves me from taking too seriously myself and my fellow men as acting and deciding individuals and from losing my temper.

 

I never coveted affluence and luxury and even despise them a good deal. My passion for social justice has often brought me into conflict with people, as did my aversion to any obligation and dependence I do not regard as absolutely necessary. I always have a high regard for the individual and have an insuperable distaste for violence and clubmanship. All these motives made me into a passionate pactfist and anti-militarist. I am against any nationalism, even in the guise of mere patriotism. Privileges based on position and property have always seemed to me unjust and pernicious, as did any exaggerated personality cult.

 

I am an adherent of the ideal of democracy, although I well know the weaknesses of the democratic form of government. Social equality and economic protection of the individual appeared to me always as the important communal aims of the state. Although I am a typical loner in daily life, my consciousness of belonging to the invisible community of those who strive for truth, beauty, and justice has preserved me from feeling isolated. The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavour in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is a something that our mind cannot grasp and whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly and as a feeble reflection, this is religiousness. In this sense I am religious. To me it suffices to wonder at these secrets and to attempt humbly to grasp with my mind a mere image of the lofty structure of all that there is." (Berlin, 1932)

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Dosoner, have you read the essay On the Duty of Civil Disobedience by Thoreau? If not go here to read it:

 

http://literatureproject.com/civil-disobed...isobedience.htm

 

It's pretty fucking long, but I think you will enjoy it. It is actually known for being the base for Ghandi's pasive resistance movement......good stuff, although it doesn't have anything to do with Einstein...

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Originally posted by dosoner

I always have a high regard for the individual and have an insuperable distaste for violence and clubmanship. All these motives made me into a passionate pactfist and anti-militarist. I am against any nationalism, even in the guise of mere patriotism.

thats always been my favorite part. does anyone have a good black and white picture of Albert Einstein? im trying to make an albert einstein stencil, so if youve seen any, hit me up with the URL.

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The Thoreau thing was good. But it only reinforces my nihilist views. Could he foresee today's State, and that democracy plus technology sets the stage for the next plutocracy? The corruption and demise of the US is certain in my eyes, I just don't know the time frame. Cycles of society make my time on earth not too significant. One of the last remaining things he talks about that I can relate to is that man's purpose on earth is not to do everything, but to do something, and that he can't constantly be burdened with activism. So it was a good read, but I'm off to paint trains.

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