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Fist 666

I went to Afghanistan a few years ago...

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Oh so much, and the soil in spring time there is phenomenal. Traction and braking would be ridiculous. Just enough mud to be fun, not enough to bog you down.

 

I don't think I have any pics, but one mission we did that was in a Grand Canyon scale wadi that had goat trails all over the sides. I told my Commander that I wanted to request a mission where we set security and the top and bottom and let me ride a few lines, with a Stryker shuttling me back up. Obviously he denied the request.

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You're so edgy...

 

Why is that? I just asked you a simple question.

 

If anybody's being "so edgy", it's the guy who made a thread bragging about how he signed up to go to war.

Wouldn't "how many people did you kill" be a logical question?

 

I wasn't giving you shit, I was just asking a logical question pertinent to your thread.

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DAO: I'm not going to answer that. I thought it was pretty well established in our culture that that is not a tactful question to ask. Maybe not, though.

 

And I'm not bragging, either. War is fucking stupid and probably changed me for the worse, costing my marriage and a bit of my sanity. I have two military tattoos: One for my platoon and one that says "war sucks."

 

I think the jet looks like that it because its a shitty patch job--its probably some sort of Afghani bondo made of mud and melted tin cans.

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Nah.

Purely ornamental. I do believe there was a program to train Afghan jet and heli pilots. There is no way that could go wrong.

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In my experience, the people who have experienced war and don't feel worse off for it are usually annoying and not very bright. And I know I'm risking another pointless argument here but I often fond the same about people who lack empathy enough to ask questions like "did you kill anyone?". Much of the time when you're up against dickbags like the Tban and so one it's not a huge deal to deal with that issue. But when you see dead kids, crying parents, torture and deprivation around you day in day out, it's all just merges in to one big pointless misery that you would prefer not to have experienced.

 

And that's one of the reasons why I can't stand naive idiots like Assange and Snowden. They don't get the core fact that intelligence work, more often than not, helps in avoiding conflict. Although, looking at how what is being released from "Snowden" has quietly morphed from a protest against state surveillance on the civilian population to the release of information that harms US diplomatic relations, I think there's good reason to have suspicions that Snowden was not the Human Rights campaigner that he's framed himself as but maybe a different kind of campaigner altogether.

 

But I digress. Asking people to elaborate on misery is a bit ignorant or at least insensitive.

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Why is that? I just asked you a simple question.

 

If anybody's being "so edgy", it's the guy who made a thread bragging about how he signed up to go to war.

Wouldn't "how many people did you kill" be a logical question?

 

I wasn't giving you shit, I was just asking a logical question pertinent to your thread.

you gay nigga

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Thanks for posting.

 

Dao is, as usual, playing instigator.

Sharing an experience that most of us have not and will not have is hardly bragging. I think the majority of us appreciate the perspective.

It never stops fascinating me that people live in such conditions. The geography alone is unfathomable to me in terms of viability as a home... not to mention the daily traumas of a war-torn country.

 

Thanks again.

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afghanistanpt2025_zps11047373.jpg

Straw. A great way to conceal shit you're not supposed to have.

 

 

Do you have to stop and search trucks like this or is a at random?

Because fucking hell that would add hours to every journey searching every beater that rolls past.

 

What did you do on the Days/hours? off?

 

I assume you couldn't drink but what were your options to entertain yourself? is there room on base to go for a run etc or is like a compound all fenced in tightly with high concrete walls or what?

 

sorry for the dumb questions it's just a slice of life that I'll never experience.

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Thanks for posting.

 

Dao is, as usual, playing instigator.

 

Maybe just a little, but not really.

 

 

 

Yo Fist, do you ever wonder about the contrast between the Vietnam war and this past decade? During Vietnam damn near everybody who went over there did so because they were drafted. They had no choice and most of them actually opposed the war. It was either go to jail or flee to Canada thus provoking your WW2 era family to disown you, or go fight for your life in the jungles of Vietnam over a war that most of you didn't even believe in. And they were all indiscriminately shunned, spit upon and called "baby killers" upon their arrival back to the US.

 

Now compare that to nowadays when we have a 100% volunteer military. Every single person who went to Iraq and Afghanistan actually signed up for the job. And I'm not sure what the civilian casualty rate of these wars is to that of Vietnam, but I'm sure they're not too far off from each other. Especially with unmanned drone strikes taking out entire wedding parties just to assassinate one or two dudes in attendance.

And back to my point, every single one of these 100% volunteer "baby killers" (as they would have been called back in the 60's and 70's) is treated like royalty and "thanked for their service". Thanked for "defending our freedom" even though nobody on this planet was even alive the last time America fought a war that had anything to do with defending America or our freedoms. and mindlessly thanked largely by the same motherfuckers who mindlessly spat on 19 and 20 year old draftees upon their return to the states after being forced to fight for their lives in a war that most of them wanted nothing to do with.

 

Not coming at you personally, just wondering if that typical American hypocrisy ever crossed your mind.

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I like the pics fist! keep posting them up.

 

Was it always so desolate or were you in towns or cities?

 

It would be a pretty unbelievable scenario being in war and all, glad you made it home safe. I also think that is the important part here, making it home in one piece.

 

I think the only thing I would do once back is discouraging other's not to join the military service until they fully understand what it means to do so.

 

Keep the pics coming!

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afghanistanpt1029_zps569c33cc.jpg

 

For those who are interested, great article about smugglers from Spin Boldak:

 

http://harpers.org/archive/2009/12/the-master-of-spin-boldak/?single=1

 

"I was learning, however, that Boldak is a special sort of border town. The big business there is cars—right-hand-drive cars, to be precise, used cars bought mainly in Japan and shipped in duty-free via Dubai. Afghanistan is a left-hand-drive country, but the vehicles are intended for Pakistan. They are sent overland from Karachi in sealed containers, unpacked in Spin Boldak, and sent right back across the border, with forged papers and baksheesh given to various officials along the way.

 

This may seem like a strange journey, but it’s a simple matter of comparative advantage. Under the Afghan Transit Trade agreement, which dates to 1965, Pakistan allows Afghanistan-bound goods to traverse its territory duty-free. Afghanistan is a free port with minimal duties, whereas in Pakistan taxes and customs can double or even triple a vehicle’s cost. This price differential, combined with widespread corruption and inefficient law enforcement in both countries, has created an enormous market for smuggling. In fact, the smuggling of goods may be the biggest economic sector in Afghanistan, larger even than the opium trade, according to World Bank reports.

 

As a result, places like Spin Boldak have become markets for all sorts of goods to be smuggled back into Pakistan. Each day, new shipping containers arrived, and Samiullah and I would often go to watch them being cracked open and unloaded. The haul was not just vehicles. It was all the cast-off crud of the First World, anything conceivably worth being shipped here: used microwave ovens, guitars, DVD players, bicycles, car stereos, TV sets, Beta camcorders, keyboards, propane stoves, motorized wheelchairs, generators, winches, children’s toys, clothing. I watched one bent, beturbaned old man hauling a tangled bundle of PlayStation controllers slung over his shoulder like a bushel of thatching."

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Afghanistan, I been there. Let me show you the ways of my people in no particular order.

 

Pics are from me or people with me.

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