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Mao Tse Fun

Portraits of Soldiers Before, During, and After War

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"Photographer Lalage Snow, who is currently based in Kabul, Afghanistan, embarked on an 8-month-long project titled We Are The Not Dead featuring portraits of British soldiers before, during, and after their deployment in Afghanistan. Similar to Claire Felicie's series of monochromatic triptychs, Snow captures the innocent expressions of these men transformed into gaunt, sullen faces in less than a year.

 

The three-panel juxtaposition allows the viewer to observe the physical changes a stationed soldier in a war zone goes through. Time is sped up for these men under the beating sun, amidst combat. Regardless of age, the boys that went in came back as men with experiences beyond their years. As weathered and worn as their skin or sunken in faces may appear, it's their dilated eyes that are the most telling."

 

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/lalage-snow-we-are-the-not-dead

 

Figured some people might appreciate this.

 

lalagesnowwearethenotdead1.jpeg

 

lalagesnowwearethenotdead2.jpeg

lalagesnowwearethenotdead3.jpeg

lalagesnowwearethenotdead4.jpeg

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don't they get special drugs during operations?

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thousand yard stare

royal_guard_marine_1000_yard_stare.jpg

 

VfiuE.jpg

 

Thousand-Yard-Stare-239x300.jpg

 

Thousand yard stare is when you seem to be looking way off in the distance. These guys have got blank stares, which is potentially much worse than a thousand yard stare, psychologically. But, it may just be the moment the picture is taken and the personality does not actually match the photo.

 

And in saying that I think the way that the photographer (or whoever) has described the pics and the men up top is way over-dramatic. When on ops you eat less, are much more physically active and get less quality sleep. So of course you're going to be more gaunt on your return, you'd look the same from a few months trecking through the outback or the Rocky's, etc.

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Its a cool idea, but I don't think the execution was particularly great.

 

Like Christo said, you lose weight regardless of what happens during war (assuming you actually have a job that requires leaving the wire). Your skin gets tough because of a hard sun and dry air. Functioning through exhaustion will fuck with your head and eyes a lot.

 

Migrant workers that pick your fruits can earn that same look, its doesn't mean they've seen shit, it just means they need some shade, water, and rest.

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war is hell.

 

looks like a good photo essay.

 

 

 

i'm REALLY interested in this though:

 

no-worse-enemy-cover-image.jpg

 

 

"This book reveals the disturbing chasm between official rhetoric and the situation on the ground. Embedded with UK and US troops for five years, Anderson witnessed first-hand IED explosions, day long gun fights, lethal sniper battles, UK and US casualties, civilian deaths and Taliban fighters who melt into the local population. The definitive book on the struggle for Helmand, No Worse Enemy is a bold and frightening insight into our longest war of modern times.

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don't they get special drugs during operations?

 

not special necessarily, but they can get drugs.

i don't know about ground combat, but it's well documented that pilots are given amphetamines

a pilot killed a bunch of people with friendly fire a few years back while he was hopped up on speed.

 

".... dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) became the drug of choice for American bomber pilots, being used on a voluntary basis by roughly half of the U.S. Air Force pilots during the Persian Gulf War, a practice which came under some media scrutiny in 2003 after a mistaken attack on Canadian troops."

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Go-pills-for-F-16-pilots-get-close-look-2687644.php

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not special necessarily, but they can get drugs.

i don't know about ground combat, but it's well documented that pilots are given amphetamines

a pilot killed a bunch of people with friendly fire a few years back while he was hopped up on speed.

 

".... dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) became the drug of choice for American bomber pilots, being used on a voluntary basis by roughly half of the U.S. Air Force pilots during the Persian Gulf War, a practice which came under some media scrutiny in 2003 after a mistaken attack on Canadian troops."

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Go-pills-for-F-16-pilots-get-close-look-2687644.php

 

ok thanks

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The nazi army is the first documented widespread use of methamphetamines, it helped the troops stay motivated and energized, and reduced the need for food.

Sound ridiculous, but it's true. Nazis were methheads, and neo-nazis are methheads too.

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I can say that I look different when I came back. I see old pics of me and think that i look so young, yet they are only from a few years ago.

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not special necessarily, but they can get drugs.

i don't know about ground combat, but it's well documented that pilots are given amphetamines

a pilot killed a bunch of people with friendly fire a few years back while he was hopped up on speed.

 

".... dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) became the drug of choice for American bomber pilots, being used on a voluntary basis by roughly half of the U.S. Air Force pilots during the Persian Gulf War, a practice which came under some media scrutiny in 2003 after a mistaken attack on Canadian troops."

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Go-pills-for-F-16-pilots-get-close-look-2687644.php

 

This is no bullshit, on the second day of operation anaconda the George Washington blew one of it's steam accumulators and couldn't launch planes. So the Stennis went to round the clock ops until the GW could get back in the fight. All aircrew and "essential" flight deck crew were given the option to get "go pills" from medical. By the end of the fourth day I was a fucking train wreck. My hands wouldn't stop shaking and I was seeing shadow people. I told the Doc and he gave me a "stop pill" and I slept for almost 18 hours. In all my years of doing various drugs, I have never taken anything like that. I can only say the first 60 hours was like that "Limitless" movie, then it went down hill fast.

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I did my best not to take any "medicine" from the Army during my whole career. Unless of course, i was essentially "forced" too. I even risked getting in trouble, because I did not (and still do not) trust the anti-malaria medicine they were giving out that was giving people screwed up dreams.

 

If they told me to take "go-pills" I would tell them no. I know that is easier said then done, but if you knew the history of my career, you would know I have done similar already.

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