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viperface

LETTERING and other crafts

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"We've been working on this logo for more than a year, and we've been talking about gilding the window for more than two years"

 

In almost any ad agency, design school and art or business institute you will find one person if not whole consensus who laugh at this man.

They think ––or better yet, "everyone can see" that he's crazy, simple, old-fashioned, slow.

They argue that big companies wouldn't hire him, that he makes very little money compared to his efforts.

They will probably die of old age without ever having a clue about what it's all about.

 

Glass gilding by John Downer

 

Skills are something even gifted people have to learn.

There are others, post some if you know or discuss. Tattoos, furniture.

Did your grandpa build a house with tools he could carry? All that stuff, art or not.

I'll try to remember to post here every time I find something.

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Why not, but perhaps not the common notion of craft as a pastime hobby, knitting socks etc.

And it's not like this is supposed to be a picture only thread.

 

With the title "Lettering and other crafts" I'm trying to view lettering from the point of a craft,

instead of another form of static, visual imagery. Stuff that you accept and forget, like often

happens with art, illustration and photographed graffiti. You see it and move on.

 

You know, someone says "graffiti is art." That's it. The end. You put spray paintings in a gallery, they

may be awesome but they're secluded from the original context and lose a lot of spirit.

 

I like Espo a lot, but there's something authentic with sign painting in practice where the text is

supposed to look good, pass information and be worn out by sunlight over decades. With or without

praise and bravado.

 

Another vimeo vid

 

 

Then again many recent artists have been using long or difficult, tedious methods as means to give

their work an impressive aspect...instead of complex theories or plain virtuosity.

 

In olden days furniture designers were supposed to be able to design, build and fix furniture. They

had to know everything about wood, joints, welding, upholstery etc. While respectable designers are

still taught some of this stuff, it's not that obvious anymore. Big proportion of design is built around

industrial aspects: You buy a cheap chair from ikea and throw it away if it breaks or you have to move.

 

Wooden and metal type was designed size-specifically: 6pt size Helvetica regular had significantly

different proportions compared to larger display sizes. This mattered back then, but much was lost in the

transition as type went digital. These features are being revived by (underpaid) type enthusiasts today.

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this reminded me of a pop up book i have

 

youtube of book

 

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David A Smith is a name that has become synonymous in Sign-Writing and Glass gilding circles, with high quality, hand crafted reverse glass signs and decorative silvered and gilded mirrors.

In this short documentary, we reveal behind the scenes work, techniques and visions that Dave uses when carrying out his passion as a glass embosser - One of the few remaining traditional UK glass artists.

See David's Elaborate Victorian Style Mirror completed here: vimeo.com/25587369

Many thanks to Ada Cole for subtitling the film, Subtitles available here: goo.gl/9sORF

 

David A Smith

davidadriansmith.com

 

A Film by Danny Cooke

dannycooke.co.uk

 

Soundtrack by Tony Higgins (Junior85)

freemusicarchive.org/music/junior85/

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shit, forgot to check back in here.

and yes, i got it on amazon

 

what is weird is they sent me two

why does that never happen with really expensive shit?

 

 

anyway fonts and lettering are things i really enjoy

i actually got into graffiti because of calligraphy

the messed up thing for me though, is that we have a lousy language for fun fonts.

 

 

 

thaitext.gif

 

904-1-pashto-hd.jpg

 

Cyrillic.jpg

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arabic (pashto/urdu/farsi/etc) is a wild font to work with in terms of graffiti.

 

i took arabic for a few years and tried doing graffiti in arabic for about an hour before i gave up, their calligraphy art is mindblowing.

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Going to post this in multiple areas. I recently re did a friends company logo, he ended up getting sued for the one he first had. I just went with simple an easy, and actually kinda like it. I did a main logo and a simplified one for engravings etc. No fonts used, just vector forms made.

 

duoj.jpg

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arabic (pashto/urdu/farsi/etc) is a wild font to work with in terms of graffiti.

 

i took arabic for a few years and tried doing graffiti in arabic for about an hour before i gave up, their calligraphy art is mindblowing.

 

yes yes yes.

i have flicked some arabic graffiti in SPain that was really amazing

and travelling through Egypt and Turkey, we enjoyed some freakin AMAZING script.

i'm interested in learning it, so many dialects and i've heard using MSA doesn't always work out so well.

 

ShortFuse, if the logo on the lower left was solid black where it says underground i think i'd like it a lot more. the graphic is cool

dunno if you care about opinions, just 2¢

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