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Smacky636

Oceans 1

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http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/12/14/nevada.bellagio.robbery/index.html?hpt=T2

 

Police say they're trying to find a helmet-wearing gunman who robbed one of Las Vegas' most recognizable casinos of $1.5 million in casino chips Tuesday morning -- and may also have robbed a different casino last week.

 

With a helmet and visor hiding his face, the man rode to Bellagio casino on a motorcycle, walked inside and pulled a gun at a craps table where several people were gambling at about 3:50 a.m., said Lt. Clint Nichols of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

 

 

 

Niice!

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Chips. Unless I'm missing something, dude didn't really do much other than make it hard on himself.

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seriously

i was reading about how hard it would be to try to exchange the high dollar value chips

obviously casinos have made it very difficult to sell them.

 

that said, i do like ballsy crimes

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If there is one thing the FBI is exceptionally good at (besides setting up innocent Somalian teenager and their Pakistani friends) it is catching bank robbers. Bank robbery, casino robbery, armored truck robbery...you're living on borrowed time afterwards regardless.

 

The best true crime stories are the ones about people who get away with wild heists.

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If there is one thing the FBI is exceptionally good at (besides setting up innocent Somalian teenager and their Pakistani friends) it is catching bank robbers. Bank robbery, casino robbery, armored truck robbery...you're living on borrowed time afterwards regardless.

 

The best true crime stories are the ones about people who get away with wild heists.

 

banks aren't really worth robbing these days anyway.

it's easier and safer to hit up smaller retail stores

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on another BALLSY note....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._B._Cooper

 

 

D. B. Cooper is the name attributed to a man who hijacked a Boeing 727 aircraft in the United States on November 24, 1971, received $200,000[1] in ransom, and parachuted from the plane. The name he used to board the plane was Dan Cooper, but through a later press miscommunication, he became known as D.B. Cooper. Despite hundreds of leads through the years, no conclusive evidence has ever surfaced regarding Cooper's true identity or whereabouts, and the bulk of the money has never been recovered. Several theories offer competing explanations of what happened after his famed jump, but the F.B.I. believes that he did not survive.[2]

 

The nature of Cooper's escape and the uncertainty of his fate continue to intrigue people. The Cooper case (code-named "Norjak" by the F.B.I.)[3] is the only unsolved U.S. aircraft hijacking,[4] and one of the few such cases anywhere in the world, along with Malaysia Airlines Flight 653.

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Gambling with said chips would be fairly easy to pull off and make the rush 10 times better when cashing in later.

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Selling that much in chips would bring him way too much attention.

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on another BALLSY note....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._B._Cooper

 

 

D. B. Cooper is the name attributed to a man who hijacked a Boeing 727 aircraft in the United States on November 24, 1971, received $200,000[1] in ransom, and parachuted from the plane. The name he used to board the plane was Dan Cooper, but through a later press miscommunication, he became known as D.B. Cooper. Despite hundreds of leads through the years, no conclusive evidence has ever surfaced regarding Cooper's true identity or whereabouts, and the bulk of the money has never been recovered. Several theories offer competing explanations of what happened after his famed jump, but the F.B.I. believes that he did not survive.[2]

 

The nature of Cooper's escape and the uncertainty of his fate continue to intrigue people. The Cooper case (code-named "Norjak" by the F.B.I.)[3] is the only unsolved U.S. aircraft hijacking,[4] and one of the few such cases anywhere in the world, along with Malaysia Airlines Flight 653.

 

 

sweet!

we should have a claasic crime thread.

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