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Signals

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s5lp3b.jpg

 

Does anyone know what the different lights mean? I always assumed red meant no train was coming, and green meant there was. But what about the red/yellow lights? I'm looking for people who actually know what the fuck they're talking about (rolling nowhere/kabar2)

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Over here yellow means the train may roll in but it will be taken to a side track then. Maybe the same in the US... Or maybe this is a stupid post

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There are signal configurations. And sometimes they dont even pay attention cuz of what the dispatcher says, as it overrides the signal.

 

Usually, green means, you're all clear.

Yellows can mean restricted speed until the next signal, approach next signal with caution, if there are certain configs with yellw over red proceed to the cross over, you'll be changing tracks. Shit like that

 

Red's mean stop, always stop. All reds in one direction, usually means that a train is approching from the other direction and all tracks are blocked. do not fucking proceed.

 

 

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what he said.

 

also red means we are sitting here for awhile sweating it out in the sun.

green means i get a cool breeze on my fuzzy cheeks.

haha

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cool pictures

 

There are signal configurations. And sometimes they dont even pay attention cuz of what the dispatcher says, as it overrides the signal.

 

 

 

that.

also as soon as the train passes a green signal it turns red again...usually.

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2 types of signals....Chessie and seaboard......

 

Seaboard is the column stacked lights...3 in a column...Chessies are the more rounded-circle shape. In addition to some dwarf signals in yards and other randonly used signals....The "aspect" and "indication" are generally the same,, will add more later...I have to go throw eggs at the pro life protestors across the street

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Each railroad used to have their own style of signal too, but they all do the same thing.

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Only chessie and seaboard.

 

To read a signal, you first read its light position....After determining lets say, you have a red on top, yellow in the middle and red on the bottom.

 

This would be a signal called " medium approach"....Which means continue to next signal at medium speed,with the ability to stop half the distance between any train or obstruction...

it been a while, but ican still callem all....I cant read chessies, never underfstood them....

 

Seaboard is so easy....The guy who engineered the chessie signals should be shot......A big ball clusterfuck of lights. so stupid..probably caused more RR accidents with those fucking signals than anything else...

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What i've learned from benching is that (atleast on CSX A line) Red means you'll be waiting for a train, yellow means that the signal might change, and green means <15 minute wait for a train. that's probably not what they mean, but it hasn't failed me yet!

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outside the yard they are just block signals . where i live we have the two parallel tracks and a side track for dropping, parking, and picking up cars. red means that you should stop all the way before the next block. yellow means there is another something on the tracks and you should reduce speed before the next block but you don't have to stop and green means that your golden and can go full speed ahead for the given track. these are NFS tracks.

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yeah, what most have already said in previous responses

while there is standardization in signaling (at least on North AMerican freights) it depends where you see the signal - a signal bridge in a yard can be a little different than a signal on a single track main. ive seen switchers haul cuts of cars through red lights in a yard before. someone sed this but the dispatcher or controller can authorize this, especially in a yard. from my experience, green means a train is coming. how long it will take to reach the signal u see depends on the speed of the train, obviously. i think yellow means the block is clear and red means the block is not clear, maybe some switching going on or a train has passed recently

something like this, maybe:

 

image020.gif

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