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Croupier

PHO - the best shit on Earth

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a brief history (via wiki).

 

Vietnamese dishes are meals typically served with lots of greens, herbs, vegetables and various other accompaniments such as dipping sauces, hot and spicy pastes, and flavor enhancements such as a squeeze of lime or lemon. The dish is garnished with ingredients such as green onions, white onions, coriander, Thai basil (húng quế) (should not be confused with sweet basil - Vietnamese: húng chó or húng dổi), fresh Thai chili peppers, lemon or lime wedges, bean sprouts, and leaves of culantro (ngò gai) (should not be confused with cilantro or coriander - which is called ngò rí in Vietnamese. The coriander plant is used just for its seeds - hạt ngò to prepare the broth, but not its leaves).

 

Several ingredients do not come with phở' but can be ordered by request. Extra beef fat in broth or nuoc beo can be ordered and comes with scallions to sweeten it. A popular side dish ordered upon request is hanh dam, or vinegared white onions.

 

[edit] Origins and regional differences

 

Phở gà at a typical phở street stall in Hanoi. Note the lack of side garnishes, typical of Northern Vietnamese-style phở.

Vietnamese phở noodle soup with sliced rare beef and well done beef brisket.Because not much was written about the origin of phở until recently, its beginnings are a bit murky and mostly culled from oral histories.[4] Still, the consensus among academics, diners and restaurateurs is that it originated about a century ago in northern Vietnam.[4] It was originally sold by vendors from large boxes, until the first phở restaurant was opened in the 1920s in Hanoi.[5]

 

While a distinctly Vietnamese dish, phở has French and Chinese influences.[4] The origin of the word was one subject in a seminar on phở held in Hanoi in 2003.[4] One theory advanced at the seminar is that the name comes from the French feu (fire), as in the dish pot-au-feu, which like phở uses the French method of adding charred onion to the broth for color and flavor, one of the techniques which distinguishes phở from other Asian noodle soups.[4] Some believe the origin of the word to be the Chinese fen (粉)[citation needed](this character is pronounced phấn in Vietnamese.)

 

There are several regional variants of phở in Vietnam, particularly divided between northern (Hanoi, called phở bắc or "northern phở"; or phở Hà Nội), central (Huế)[citation needed], and southern (Ho Chi Minh City/Saigon). One regional phở may be sweeter, and another variation may emphasize a bolder and spicier flavor[citation needed]. "Northern phở" tends to use somewhat wider noodles and green onions.photo 1photo 2 On the other hand, southern Vietnamese generally use thinner noodles[citation needed] (approximately the width of pad Thai or linguine noodles), and add bean sprouts and a greater variety of fresh herbs to their phở instead. The variations in meat, broth, and additional garnishes such as lime, bean sprouts, ngò gai (Eryngium foetidum), hung que (Thai/Asian basil), and tuong (bean sauce/hoisin sauce) appear to be innovations introduced in the south.[4]

 

The specific place of origin appears to be southwest of Hanoi in Nam Dinh province, then a substantial textile market, where cooks sought to please both Vietnamese (local rice noodles - originally of Chinese origin) and French tastes (cattle before the French arrival being beasts of burden, not sources of beef).[4][5]

 

Phở did not become popular in South Vietnam until the mid-1950s.[6]

 

Phở has become popular in Canada, particularly on the West Coast but also in any city[7] and the United States, particularly on the East and West Coast; such a cuisine brought by Vietnamese refugees who settled in North America from the late 1970s onwards.

 

I've got my spot in Atlanta- Pho Bac on Buford Hwy @Chamblee Tucker Rd., I would love to know where to go when I travel...

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I tried pho for the first time a few weeks ago after hearing much hype about it, both on here and from my Asian homies, and I have to say I was disapointed.

 

It was OK, but not something I'll probably ever eat again

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I tried pho for the first time a few weeks ago after hearing much hype about it, both on here and from my Asian homies, and I have to say I was disapointed.

 

It was OK, but not something I'll probably ever eat again

 

 

I have tried it at 3 diff spots in ATL, (that's about all we got). Truth be told, 1 spot (Pho Bac) outshines the other 2 by a fucking landslide. Point being, don't write it off before you try a few spots...

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im not a big fan of any soups...but the first (and only) time i had pho was with suki, iou and shai.

 

it was good, but lacking on noodles and meat...so i felt like i needed more starch in it...

 

..so i ordered a side of rice...and when they brought the rice, i dumped it into my pho..

 

..when the waiter saw this, he shot me a dirty/disappointed look.

 

i felt ashamed.

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Guest T14K
I tried pho for the first time a few weeks ago after hearing much hype about it, both on here and from my Asian homies, and I have to say I was disapointed.

 

It was OK, but not something I'll probably ever eat again

 

but you generally fail on the food front anyway.

 

don't like sushi. don't like avocados. don't like pho.

 

i mean i love you no homo. but your taste in food is ass.

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Guest T14K

also i can't imagine the pho in RI being all that great.

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Providence has a huge Asian population, there's alot of really good spots here.

 

And my taste in food is an epic win, yours is that of a faggot. I still love you as well though, no homo

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**not to mention the shit is less than $7 for a big fat portion & they generally don't serve alcohol, so you don't have to worry about running up a giant bill. after tip, i am usually out for under $9.

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Guest 50million

shit is amazing. just had some the other day. well deserved thread.

 

 

 

pho_dac_biet.jpg

 

 

 

my boyfriend loves bun bo hue. congealed pig's blood soup.

 

BunBoHue.jpg

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Providence has a huge Asian population, there's alot of really good spots here.

 

During the 80's, there was a huge influx of refugees from Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos. Providence's suburbs got a bunch of them.

 

 

Pho is the shit though, you need to figure out the right mix for yourself. It's all about the fixings man. Throw in the beef paste, sriracha, and hoisin sauce. It's all about the condiments man.

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pho rocks.

 

i fucking hate how everyone calls it "FOE" and then theres always that one fucking person who says its pronounced like "FUH". then they always call it "FUH" like its fucking cool. i hate that.

 

yesmad. but not at chiracha, fucking love it.

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Phở bò tái: Phở with half-done beef fillet.

Phở bò chín nạc: Phở with well-done beef brisket.

Phở bắp bò: Phở with beef muscle.

Phở nạm bò: Phở with beef flank.

Phở gân bò: Phở with beef tendon.

Phở sách bò: Phở with beef tripe.

Phở bò viên: Phở with beef meat balls.

Phở gà: Chicken phở.

Phở sot vang: Phở in beef stew soup

Phở tái: Phở with raw beef fillet.

 

But if you're ill with it you get the dac biet!

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