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herbsyntec

Metal Ties

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an end to wooden railroad ties, more and more computer controlled rail traffic flow, perhaps robot engines and possibly a revival of electric freight service.

 

In another thread in here Kabar said this. In the local yard and some lay-ups and various spots, I have seen a shift towards this. I cannot figure out a pattern. Is anyone on the know on this? Is there a legitimate shift to metal ties? Is it hitting any main lines?

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i dont see what the problem is with metal ties...can someone explain why this is a big deal..or at least big enough to open a thread about it.

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THere are metal ties, but concrete ties are more popular, they are durable and the way they are made is very interesting.

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They rebar int he middle is stretched as tight as they can, then the concrete is poured ontop of them, then the rebar is released, making them extremely strong.

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I havebt seen any metal ties myself. I have seen some newer concrete ties. But thats mostly around new or renovated train & subway stations. I think its only for economics, that they are useing the concrete. Woods not going anywhere any time soon. I have been seeing alot of working being done to the lines around my way. Swaping out old rails and laying new WOOD ties. I Actaully saw a local fr8 workers today laying new wood ties on branch section of a fr8 line.

 

Got any flicks of the metal ties??

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Concrete ties and would ties are both being used, as well as metal ties. Concrete ties are being used in yard situations where they new heavier cars such as excess height cars and reefers are being placed. Mainline operations in the powder river basin also use concrete ties.

 

They also have composite railroad ties made of plastics and polymers

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you also run into concrete ties on high speed or highly traveled lines (like the powder river) where such strong infrastructure is necessary.

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Yeah, i was gonna include that, but i dont think people care as much as they make out, I think maybe 1 percent or less of freight writers actually care about freights

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Yeah, i was gonna include that, but i dont think people care as much as they make out, I think maybe 1 percent or less of freight writers actually care about freights

yup your right about that and seen them putting down metal ties there really light to only takes 2 people to lift them

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Yeah, i was gonna include that, but i dont think people care as much as they make out, I think maybe 1 percent or less of freight writers actually care about freights

 

agreed. and it isn't that surprising... although i've found that the more i know about freights the easier it is to paint them and the more i understand about where my work will travel.

 

i'm not sure why metal ties would be used though, it seems that they would deteriorate faster than wood, be much louder, and generally more of a nuisance. ties from recycled plastic would be great for all parties: MOW wouldn't have to replace ties that often, and plastic could end up somewhere other than a dump where it takes 4000 years to decompose, or however long it takes.

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agreed. and it isn't that surprising... although i've found that the more i know about freights the easier it is to paint them and the more i understand about where my work will travel.

 

i'm not sure why metal ties would be used though, it seems that they would deteriorate faster than wood, be much louder, and generally more of a nuisance. ties from recycled plastic would be great for all parties: MOW wouldn't have to replace ties that often, and plastic could end up somewhere other than a dump where it takes 4000 years to decompose, or however long it takes.

 

your right this is the best section on this whole site but people only paint trains cause its the cool thing to do now a days anyways

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I mean, its good that people dont care, cuz then being more knowledgeable puts us a step ahead of others ya know. But it has its faults too.

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These look like they are sitting on top of the ground. Seems like they can be quickly moved and reassembled differently if required. I think that was already mentioned.

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They are on the ground, awaiting ballast

 

melded in 09, too. and the metal looks untreated. i can't figure out why that would make any sense at all... oh well.

 

 

learn somethin' new everyday.

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Those ties are for a new amtrak storage track at a station they are retrofitting to allow layovers of trains. I couldnt tell you why they are untreated. Probably because its Amtrak.

 

 

I dont know if its worth mentioning, but because they are hollow, you can stack many many more in the same amount of space as a regular tie.

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only bad thing I see with metal ties, imagine areas of the country, like New England, where temperature changes, from balls hot, to freezing temperatures. All metal warps... It just seems ignorant for them to use metal ties, unless it's like a temporary deal, like building a layup in a parking lot for some reason, etc. like pictured above.

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THe photo above is a turnout laid on concrete before they install it in the track bed, its by no means "in place" there.

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