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Hayabusa

Low Budget Screen Printing (With Pics!)

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So as many of you may or may not know, I have been on the screen printing tip for a while. Ive done a bunch of research online and bought all the stuff I needed, but never got around to hooking it up and doing it, until recently. Its a bit of trial and error, but I think I will get it on my next run...

 

All together, I spent probably about 80$ on EVERYTHING (Shirts not included)

I bought emulsion, emulsion remover, a large screen, a 500 watt work light (found it on sale for $10!), and some fabric paint.

 

The squeegies I made myself out of some plastic tennis ball container I had laying around.

The big piece of glass was also I had laying around the house for some reason (Lucky)

 

Anyways, I know theres a lot out there online about this with pics and instruction, so I will keep mine short

 

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This was my image (drawn by hand on two pieces of paper taped together...text is a font)

 

1.jpg

 

I scanned it, then printed it out on clear plastic paper you use in school for overhead projectors. MS PAINT has a dope setup that automatically adjusts the image to print out on however many papers you want.

 

2.jpg

 

The 'grey' is ziptone from photoshop

 

3.jpg

 

This is my equipment. Most notable, the work light came with a cage and a clear glass cover. The cage I removed and tossed so it doesnt cast a shadow, and the clear glass was also removed. The light at high wattage produces the desired UV rays (Stuff that activates the emulsion) and the glass cover is designed to filter the UV rays, hence, it was not needed. NEEDLESS TO SAY: DONT LOOK DIRECTLY INTO THE LIGHT NOR TOUCH IT WHEN ITS ON

 

4.jpg

 

This is the photo emulsion:

 

5.jpg

 

shelf life of 8 months while in fridge. When exposed to UV Rays for the right amount of time, it turns hard. The thing makes a stencil for you without you having to really do anything

 

6.jpg

 

This is one of the squeegies for the emulsion. It needs to be spread on the screen evenly. You pour the shit into the curved bit, and then apply. Youtube it. The best video is the one with the guys making wolf shirts, FYI

 

7.jpg

 

Screen is coated with emulsion, and left to DRY IN A DARK PLACE so it doesnt react to the UV Rays from sunlight

 

8.jpg

 

dark place:

 

9.jpg

 

I think I coated it too much, because my print got slightly fucked, AND it took almost 2 hours to dry. In the mean time, I played video games. Yes, I parked the chopper infront of my safe house.

 

10.jpg

 

When dry, I placed the clear plastic print out of the design (backwards) onto the screen. The glass was placed over top to press it down and ensure contact with the screen. THe black shirt underneith is to prevent light bouncing back off the ground and exposing parts I didnt want exposed. Basically, the black bits are bits that will be black on your final print since the light wont get through, allowing you to wash it off thus creating a stencil.

 

11.jpg

 

The light is on, and exposures going down. I hung it between a hockey stick and a workout bar

 

12.jpg

 

G-H-E-T-T-O

 

13.jpg

 

I had a fan going cuz the light gets REALLY hot.

 

14-1.jpg

 

When finished, you should see a ghost image on the screen

 

15.jpg

 

Take it to a shower or outside, and wash off the shit thats been blocked out

In this situation, I OVEREXPOSED THE SCREEN, so I couldnt wash out everything I wanted. MEANING: THe light still managed to somehow get through the black portions. ANyways, dont over expose it

 

16.jpg

 

shits mega messy but you get the idea

 

This is another squeegie I made for the paint.

 

17.jpg

 

Now all youze do is place some thick cardboard into a shirt so the paint doesnt go through. Place some paint on the top part of the screen, and with the squeegie just drag it across the image

 

18.jpg

 

Ta-da!

 

19.jpg

 

You can see the 'distressed' look in it, which isnt supposed to be there. I wasnt able to wash out all the emulsion that I intended to. Lesson learned. The little dots were actually the one thing that I thought Id fuck up but they turned out the best. Go figure

 

20.jpg

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Now for the clean-up

 

Now back to the tub to wash out the paint before it dries on the screen (Important)

 

21.jpg

 

Use this shit, and brush it all over the screen once the paint is off. It came with the emulsion itself, but you can also buy it seperatly...

 

22.jpg

 

Screen good as new and ready for another round..

 

23.jpg

 

 

The process itself is a LOT EASIER than cutting out a stencil. You can get much better and cleaner designs. Its a lot less of a hassle, and its a lot more reusable then reusing stencils. The only down side is, cleaning is a bit of a bitch, but if you can stand that, its worth doing.

 

Plus, there was a class at a local art school charging people about $70 for a one day 'lesson' in how to print, and you get to have your own 8.5" by 11" image printed on a shirt by the end of the day. Woooopty! I spent just as much maybe a bit more, and I can do as many shirts as big as I want for as long as I feel like! SUCKERS!

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I've been thinking about trying out somthing like this so this was a really good tutorial..thanks a ton, but i dont fully understand what the screen is. So do you put the Emulsion formula on the glass? or i dunno...im confused about that part and exactly how this all works..maybe im dumb bajaja, let me know.

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I've been thinking about trying out somthing like this so this was a really good tutorial..thanks a ton, but i dont fully understand what the screen is. So do you put the Emulsion formula on the glass? or i dunno...im confused about that part and exactly how this all works..maybe im dumb bajaja, let me know.

 

 

this should clear everything up... this video helped me a ton when learning

 

you put the emulsion on the screen which is made of 'silk'/fabric. When you expose the emulsion to light/uv rays, it hardens (not allowing any paint through the fabric). If parts of the emulsion are covered, they dont harden, allowing you to wash them off. So its basically like making a stencil with light, emulsion, and your image thats printed on a transperency.

 

The glass just weighs things down and ensures the image/transperency is right on the screen blocking out the necessary parts of the emulsion, and ensuring you get a nice image burnt into the screen

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nice...i used to fuck with that some when i was younger. the timing of the exposure is definitely critical to getting clean prints. once you get into a flow you start to really think about your print images differently too...you can get really creative. especially with multiple layers. good work!

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nice...i used to fuck with that some when i was younger. the timing of the exposure is definitely critical to getting clean prints. once you get into a flow you start to really think about your print images differently too...you can get really creative. especially with multiple layers. good work!

 

yeh the level of detail you can get is what really surprised me. Its definately a lot better than I thought it would be. And way easier for making shirts than cutting out stencils

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Way to do it dude. there's actually a good screen printing place that i use. I just set up a screen printing studio in a new office that i got. I used to do it out of my living room but that get REAAAALLY messy really quickly.

 

hit me up on pm i'll give you some info on some cheap but very good stuff.

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yeh, this shit is REALLY messy! Especially cleaning the screen. I have to wash my bathtub every time Im done cleaning the screen off. Its ridiculous but at least my bathtub is now spottless all the time

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nice stuff haya, i've been doing this for a while now myself, i have a pretty cool set up, with revolving press that can hold 6 screens, for fast making of multi layered shirts. also, whats really nice is a lightbox. you can put your screen in there, and turn it on, get your image burned within 2 minutes. and when you're squeegeeing the paint onto your shirt. pass over it maybe a couple of times, but don't press too hard, its all practise makes perfect. nice stuff though. give me a shout if you have any questions.

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thanks for all the replies

 

one thing ive noticed is the paint tended to bleed on the shirt if the lines were too thin/detialed, but i might have been pressing too hard

ill look to do another print next week on my day off and see how it goes

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thanks for this thread!

 

been wanting to get into this

 

thought it'd be much more costly and complicated

 

now i can hopefully i can get on it with minimal cashflow and bothering friends for advice

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question for u guys with some experience in this .... my paint is kind of glossy... i wants it to look flatter... whats a good paint to use or the method to get a more washed out and faded look?

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right now you're using speedball water based fabric ink?

 

yeh its fabric screen printing ink from speedball, water based

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thats how me and some of my boys started out 5 yrs ago...now we have a store on Ashland Ave in Chicago called The Novem Store.

 

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damn haya that was a dope post. awesome process you used.

 

how much more complicated does it get when going more then one color??

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damn haya that was a dope post. awesome process you used.

 

how much more complicated does it get when going more then one color??

stencil revolution website has a tutorial on that

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im not sure how much you can really do with changing the way the water based stuff turns out, check the speedball website. i am mostly more familiar with the never dry screenprinting paint, however, i have used the water based for street art shit. ill check on friday at work for maybe some products that we have kicking around for the speedball stuff.

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actually, after it dried it didnt look too bad... im working on some more new designs these days, but havent had enough days off work to really make an impact

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See I never use photo emulsion. I do it the pain painstakingly process of drawing fluid and then screen filler. Ive always done things differently than stated. I use regular acrylics that I mix with textile medium to allow flex. And I never wipe clean and hard with my squeegee.... do a quick wipe over and make sure all paint has made contact, then wipe hard, then wipe a 3rd time making sure all the pain has a some what not too thick level and then lift the screen. Ive found in the past that if you wipe too clean that certain whites will soak into the shirts and the color wont be bold enough. So with that extra it allows it to soak and also be bold enough with any fade.

 

 

:edit: I have used photo emulsion but I can never get a clear print out that blocks the sun or light good enough.

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