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Weapon X

Top 10 Military Movies of All Time

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http://www.armytimes.com/entertainment/movies/military_afimovies_070709w/

 

 

10. A Bridge Too Far (1977)

 

“Out of the sky comes the screen’s most incredible spectacle of men and war!” is how the movie poster sold it way back when. Featuring more stars than a box of Lucky Charms, “Bridge” tells the story of Operation Market Garden, the Allies’ botched attempt to break through the Nazi lines in the Netherlands during World War II.

 

The film mixes archival footage with memorable performances from the likes of James Caan, Michael Caine, Sean Connery, Gene Hackman, Anthony Hopkins and Robert Redford. Arguably one of the best war films of the modern era, its absence from the ballot should be a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

 

 

 

9. The Dirty Dozen (1967)

 

“Train them! Excite them! Arm them! ... Then turn them loose on the Nazis!” might sound like overstating the point, but “The Dirty Dozen” delivers all that and more. Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Telly Savalas and Charles Bronson star in the story of 12 military prisoners, all serving life sentences or awaiting execution, who are offered a chance to trade their punishments for a suicide mission aimed at disrupting the German chain of command before the D-Day invasion.

 

If they make it out, they go free.

 

Good enough to land at No. 65 on AFI’s 2001 list of “100 Years ... 100 Thrills,” the movie failed to crack the greatest hits list, or even the ballot. Hard to believe, considering it was nominated for four Oscars (with one win, for best sound effects) and was a huge box-office success for MGM.

 

We demand a recount.

 

 

 

8. The Great Escape (1963)

 

“The Great Adventure! The Great Entertainment! The Great Escape!” In this movie based on real events, the most notorious escape artists of the Nazi prison system are placed in the Alcatraz of POW camps, where they promptly make plans to tunnel their way to freedom.

 

Starring Richard Attenborough, Steve McQueen, James Garner and Charles Bronson, the film takes some liberties with the truth, but still manages to deliver a wild romp (and an incredible motorcycle chase scene, as McQueen makes a run for Switzerland).

 

The AFI folks were smart enough to include “The Great Escape” on the ballot, but the voters missed the target.

 

 

 

7. Top Gun (1986)

 

“Up there with the best of the best.” Indeed, “Top Gun” belongs at the top, if only for giving us such memorable catchphrases as “I feel the need ... the need for speed.”

 

For the three people out there who haven’t seen it, “Top Gun” is the story of military pilots — sorry, naval aviators — honing their dog-fighting skills at the Navy Fighter Weapons School. The tragic loss of a main character reminds us all that life is far too fragile.

 

Not a war movie, you say? Blasphemy. You don’t consider entering a 4G inverted dive with a MiG-28 over international waters as “combat.” Tell that to Cougar. He couldn’t handle it, turned in his wings. That’s how Tom Cruise and Anthony Edwards (leaders of an ensemble cast that includes Val Kilmer, Kelly McGillis and Meg Ryan) ended up at the school in the first place.

 

Alternately cliché and charismatic, “Top Gun” is a must-see.

 

 

 

6. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006)

 

Perhaps it was just too new?

 

Clint Eastwood is all over the Top 400 ballot, as both an actor and a director, but somehow the AFI pollsters managed to miss one of his greatest efforts. “Letters from Iwo Jima,” the story of the American assault on the tiny Japanese island during World War II, shows the battle from the viewpoint of the Japanese defenders.

 

A companion piece to “Flags of Our Fathers” — a decent movie in its own right, although James Bradley’s book was far better — the film succeeds in illuminating the complexities of war. As the movie clearly illustrates, there are always two sides to every story.

 

Expect to see “Letters” make the list down the road, once the new-movie smell wears off.

 

 

 

 

5. The Caine Mutiny (1954)

 

Think “Crimson Tide,” but better.

 

“The Caine Mutiny” tells the fictional story of a wacko Navy captain relieved of command by his crew during World War II, and of the subsequent trial of the mutineers. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Herman Wouk, the film raises serious questions about the chain of command and blindly following orders.

 

Nominated for seven Oscars, “The Caine Mutiny” had the misfortune of running against Marlon Brando in the classic “On the Waterfront,” and was shut out at the Academy Awards. Nonetheless, Humphrey Bogart shines alongside then-newcomer Lee Marvin in a supporting role.

 

That the AFI team left it off the ballot should inspire mutiny, too.

 

 

 

4. Glory (1989)

 

An account of racial prejudice during the Civil War, “Glory” tells the true story of the Army’s first all-black regiment.

 

Starring Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman, the film depicts two struggles — one against stereotypes, the other against the Confederate Army. “Glory” earned Washington an Oscar and a Golden Globe for best supporting actor, and was good enough to make the AFI ballot, but wasn’t good enough to be selected by the voting members.

 

Prepare to be weepy by the end.

 

 

3. Black Hawk Down (2001)

 

Possibly the loudest war movie ever made, “Black Hawk Down” rattles the nerves with the sheer volume of the combat sequences.

 

From start to finish, the gritty retelling of the Battle of Mogadishu during operations in Somalia in October 1993 reminds viewers that things can go tragically wrong on the battlefield in an instant. Based on the best-selling book by Mark Bowden, the film is shockingly realistic, bringing combat to life in a way few other movies have managed.

 

That “Black Hawk Down” didn’t even make the ballot, when movies such as “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” did, is just sad.

 

 

 

2. Patton (1970)

 

 

If you’ve never seen “Patton,” you shouldn’t even be reading this list.

 

Starring George C. Scott as the iconic American general, “Patton” tells the story of Gen. George S. Patton Jr., a loud, irascible man whose hatred of the enemy was overshadowed only by his own ambition.

 

The winner of seven of the 10 Oscars it was nominated for in 1971, including best actor, best director and best picture, “Patton” was at least considered good enough to make it onto the ballot.

 

 

 

1. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

 

Private Joker, are you trying to offend me?

 

Our pick for the best war movie of the past 20 years, if not all time, and it didn’t even crack the Top 400 ballot. Words fail to express how wrong that is.

 

“Full Metal Jacket,” directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Matthew Modine, Vincent D’Onofrio and R. Lee Ermey (in the role that made him a star), could be considered two great war movies for the price of one. The first half of the film shows Marine recruits at boot camp, preparing for Vietnam, while the second half deals with the violence and uncertainty of that war.

 

Perhaps it was the vulgarity and brutality of the film that made it such a tough sell for the voters. Or the vulgarity. Maybe the racism. Did we mention the vulgarity?

 

Not for the faint of heart, “Full Metal Jacket” is about as real as it comes without signing a contract. Even today, many of the themes still ring true.

 

And that’s all we have to say about that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is armytimes' list of war movies that didn't make AFI's list of top 100 American movies of all time.

 

I'm hoping that Platoon was on the AFI list. It must have been.

 

And though Das Boot is German, that should be on any war movie list ever.

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Where the FUCK is Saving Private Ryan?

 

Maybe they should have just added Band of Brothers even though it wasnt a war MOVIE but sill. Top Gun? Wtf.

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Guest R@ndomH3ro

Dirty Dozen agreed

 

Top Gun....not so much

 

 

What about The Battle Of Midway with Audie Murphy?

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Guest R@ndomH3ro

platoon.jpg

 

 

Surprised this hasnt come up yet

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Guest R@ndomH3ro

Platoon, Spit

 

 

Muthafuckin Platoon

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i was under the impression audie murphy was a pedo--thats why the army stopped being so stoked on him...

 

platoon is fucking awesome.

i also love all the old shitty john wayne flicks.

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The armytimes, where this list came from is usually the worst paper I have ever seen. I do not believe anything they write. They are a bunch of idiots.

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Also, where is Kelly's Heroes.

 

Ding ding ding! That list automatically lost when it put Top Gun on there over about 100 movies.

 

How about Platoon, Das Boot, Tora Tora Tora...

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full metal jacket!

i thought platoon would be in there for sure. i like platoon.

 

the only one im iffy about in that list is top gun.

they should replace it with this...

 

Hot_Shots.jpg

 

 

 

i remember seeing this as a kid. havent seen it lately.

200px-Uncommon_valor.jpg

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Guest R@ndomH3ro

More like an "after the war" movie but still fuckin awesome

 

deerhunter.jpg

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Guest R@ndomH3ro

mash.jpg

 

M*A*S*H was also pretty good...the movie, not the tv show

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plattoon, saving private ryan, hamburger hill

 

i wasn't a big fan of apocalypse now. after the fighting scene, it just dragged on and on and the storyline veered somewhere else. francis ford coppola even said he was depressed because he thought the film was a disaster. that is unil it received rave receptions and reviews. i think coppola was right, it was a disaster. i think it just became received well because his fuck-ups inadvertantly caused the film to be "abstract" and eccentric, which people tend to gravitate to.

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This is armytimes' list of war movies that didn't make AFI's list of top 100 American movies of all time.

 

I'm hoping that Platoon was on the AFI list. It must have been.

 

And though Das Boot is German, that should be on any war movie list ever.

 

....

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