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akewone

backjumps

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ive bin painting steel for a while now but only at yards, i wanna find some backjumps and was wondering if someone could send us a pm on how to spot a backjumps and what to look for. cheers

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is a backjump where trains just pull off for a while, not a yard just like a side track for cars?

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Jesus christ, back jump, you jump on the back of the trolley and ride where you need to go

 

 

Who framed roger fucking rabbit style!

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What you are talking about is called "slack action." If your train is "live" (made up to power--a "unit" or maybe several units, for road power) you hear the air brakes hissing slowly like ssssssSSSSS and then creaking and squeaking noises from the brakes, the hogger is "airing up" and is preparing to pull, within minutes. Usually, before a train pulls, the conductor walks the train, checking for dragging gear, brake hose supports and so on. This would be a good time to be WELL HIDDEN and very quiet. If you are standing there writing your masterpiece when the conductor strolls up, he will be pretty annoyed. Bring bail money.

 

If you hear a great big SWOOSH of air, they just set the brakes and the train probably won't be moving for a while. This SWOOOSH is called "breaking the air" (disconnecting the air brakes of the train from it's compressor source on the unit) and is usually a sign they are dropping off cars on the head end, or it could mean you're sidetracked for a while. It kind of depends on the circumstances and what track your train is on.

 

Why would you be painting on live trains anyway?

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I prefer the term "dynamiting" for the big swoosh.

Kabar, I don't know which post you were responding to, but the original question concerned backjumps and some people don't seem to know the definition.

A backjump is when you ride a subway or passenger train to the endstation, get off, and paint it right there (typically on the non-platform side) before it resumes service in the other direction.

The term has nothing to do with freight trains.

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Jesus christ, back jump, you jump on the back of the trolley and ride where you need to go

 

 

Who framed roger fucking rabbit style!

 

Eddie Valient does back jumps wasted as shit off straight wild turkey...theirs no competition.

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Cracked---

Thank you, sir, for that explanation. I had never heard the term before. There are no subways in Houston, where I ive. We have light rail, but I think if anybody tried painting on a Red Line car the passengers would go ballistic.

 

I stand corrected. But why couldn't somebody just have explained that to Friday Nite Project? I watched and read ELEVEN sarcastic posts before answering him. I understand that the vast majority of the people on here are kids, and they love being "in the know" and putting down people who aren't on the "in", but that's really immature. But thanks for the explanation. I learn a lot of interesting stuff on 12 oz.

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I believe it is the mentality that most of us didnt have 12oz to teach us stuff when we first started and dont feel like these kids deserve to learn stuff without actually being in the situation.

 

people have painted the houston light rails, nice cars, i been there

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most graffiti on passenger cars of any kind is cleaned quickly, some dont even make it out of el yardo

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^^ and on most of those new intown passenger cars they are spraying somekind of repellant on it, then they can buff you with a power washer like at carwashes.

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