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goosequit

GRAFFITI ART EXHIBITION IN HONG KONG

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i'm having an art exhibition tomorrow night.

 

i'll make a nice thread with pics complete with asian hotties and the results of a graffiti event sponsored with free booze. should be good times.

 

sorry for the pre-thread thread but i need to ask a favor.

 

does anyone have any price lists/artists bios used at art exhibition openings? something i can use as a template? i gotta fucking write about myself in fucking 3rd person which i fucking hate doing and i need a price list of my work... i'd like to see how others do it. i've seen so many but i just don't remember exactly what they look like. how they are arranged.

 

i know this is a long shot but i can't find shit on the internet and i gotta type this shit up.

 

sorry for the wack thread but i promise i'll turn it into a proper one in a few days.

 

-goose

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i'm having an art exhibition tomorrow night.

 

 

 

does anyone have any price lists/artists bios used at art exhibition openings? something i can use as a template?

i know this is a long shot but i can't find shit on the internet and i gotta type this shit up.

 

sorry for the wack thread but i promise i'll turn it into a proper one in a few days.

 

-goose

 

I know My bio is going to get ranked on hard, but I'm down to help.

 

Born and raised in Cleveland Ohio, xxxxxxxxx began his art career at an early age as an admirer of graffiti art that he saw scattered around his neighborhood on the West Side of town. He always wondered how and why people did it. What did it mean? Did they do it for free? Was it allowed? Years of being a bystander in the subculture went by and xxxxx continued to draw what he saw in his environment. He began to follow the graffiti "trails" to places with densly marred walls full of this urban art. After repeatedly visiting these places at varying hours, he began to meet some of the local graffiti "writers" of his area. These so-called vandals took xxxxxxx under their wing and began teaching him about the history and techniques of the art. As time passed, he began to paint on his own. First in his neighborhood, then around the West Side of Cleveland. Years went by, and xxxxxxxx had his psudeonym "tagged" all over town. Everywhere he went he left his mark. He continued to develop his skills as an artist, and a graffiti writer. He was now creating works of art with spraypaint cans that rivaled most airbrush artists he saw. As he reached his late teens graffiti had taught him more than just art. It raised him from a boy to a man. It taught him leadership and the spirit of competition. It brought about an ability to network and socialize using these talents society itself deemed as "illegal art". It was time for xxxxxx to take the aquired skills and transcend. He began to work the club circuits, offering his talents out for local dj's and bands. This began to gain him notariaty and connections. Hs name was now out of the shadows. The art had grown from off the walls to many different mediums. xxxxxxx now considered himself more than just a graffiti writer. He was an artist with a message. He was picked up in the Fall of 2000 by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and asked to do presentations regarding graffiti as part of the hiphop culture. Alongside this, xxxxxx was now learning and experimenting with other forms of fine art like abstract and graphic design. Years have passed since and xxxxxxxxx now does work for major corporations, sports teams, clubs, and is still a presentor/ educator for the group Progressive Arts Alliance which spawned from the early Rock Hall presentations. His abstract expressionism pieces can be seen in galleries across the metropolitan Cleveland area. These pieces still hold the essence of graffiti art and culture inside each one. The pieces are done with his familiar tools of his youth: Spraypaint, markers, and acrylics. Most pieces have a written or "tagged" message to the viewers. From teen graffiti artist to Gallery artist/ educator, xxxxxxx still spreads his message and name across the city to this day.

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It was time for xxxxxx to take the aquired skills and transcend.

 

space and time? or just one? know what i'm talking about?

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for my price lists i just have title, media, date. if its a group show, put your name in there too. i usually number my work and stick little number stickers below the paintings rather than making title placards.

i never write a bio, just an artist statment that describes my current work.

hopefully that helps some, good luck man.

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google search how to write an artist statement, fuc a bio. the prices of your wor are all relative to what youve sold in the past and where your showing. the gallery your showing at should be able to help you gauge that stuff no?

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If it's a graffiti art show why not make it funny and replace your name with the bio of some dead but well known artist? Or perhaps a disgraced mayor?

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I know My bio is going to get ranked on hard, but I'm down to help.

 

Born and raised in Cleveland Ohio, xxxxxxxxx began his art career at an early age as an admirer of graffiti art that he saw scattered around his neighborhood on the West Side of town. He always wondered how and why people did it. What did it mean? Did they do it for free? Was it allowed? Years of being a bystander in the subculture went by and xxxxx continued to draw what he saw in his environment. He began to follow the graffiti "trails" to places with densly marred walls full of this urban art. After repeatedly visiting these places at varying hours, he began to meet some of the local graffiti "writers" of his area. These so-called vandals took xxxxxxx under their wing and began teaching him about the history and techniques of the art. As time passed, he began to paint on his own. First in his neighborhood, then around the West Side of Cleveland. Years went by, and xxxxxxxx had his psudeonym "tagged" all over town. Everywhere he went he left his mark. He continued to develop his skills as an artist, and a graffiti writer. He was now creating works of art with spraypaint cans that rivaled most airbrush artists he saw. As he reached his late teens graffiti had taught him more than just art. It raised him from a boy to a man. It taught him leadership and the spirit of competition. It brought about an ability to network and socialize using these talents society itself deemed as "illegal art". It was time for xxxxxx to take the aquired skills and transcend. He began to work the club circuits, offering his talents out for local dj's and bands. This began to gain him notariaty and connections. Hs name was now out of the shadows. The art had grown from off the walls to many different mediums. xxxxxxx now considered himself more than just a graffiti writer. He was an artist with a message. He was picked up in the Fall of 2000 by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and asked to do presentations regarding graffiti as part of the hiphop culture. Alongside this, xxxxxx was now learning and experimenting with other forms of fine art like abstract and graphic design. Years have passed since and xxxxxxxxx now does work for major corporations, sports teams, clubs, and is still a presentor/ educator for the group Progressive Arts Alliance which spawned from the early Rock Hall presentations. His abstract expressionism pieces can be seen in galleries across the metropolitan Cleveland area. These pieces still hold the essence of graffiti art and culture inside each one. The pieces are done with his familiar tools of his youth: Spraypaint, markers, and acrylics. Most pieces have a written or "tagged" message to the viewers. From teen graffiti artist to Gallery artist/ educator, xxxxxxx still spreads his message and name across the city to this day.

 

that's pretty gay. it's too long, it aint interesting at all, it could be about any writer.

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I have a few handstyles riding in that city.

 

good luck finding'em

 

but yeah, flicks of asian cuties pleeze

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that's pretty gay. it's too long, it aint interesting at all, it could be about any writer.

 

Sorry buddy, that's my gay uninteresting life. I get paid though.

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that's pretty gay. it's too long, it aint interesting at all, it could be about any writer.

 

it's an artist bio, that's how it goes

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I have a few handstyles riding in that city.

 

good luck finding'em

 

but yeah, flicks of asian cuties pleeze

 

Hmmm...wonder if I've seen 'em. I end up in some pretty obscure places.

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Hmmm...wonder if I've seen 'em. I end up in some pretty obscure places.

 

maybe. they're pretty cutty.

 

if i can remember the road, i'll tell you where to look. it's a tag on the back of a bus stop which i am sure is still there from last year.

 

 

i like the little digital bongo sound that goes off at the crosswalks. When it picks up, you better move your ass because they don;t wait for pedestrians there!

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my understanding is that pwm is a collective of dudes in the midwest that do shit. one of the guys is a good friend of mine in hk who is doing his thing in the streetwear/hypebeast scene or whatever the fuck. i don't know anything about that stuff. sorry i can't be more helpful but thats about the best i understand. my friend in hk is gio chiapetta. he has a blog on hypebeast. you can probly contact him through there for more inquiries.

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it's an artist bio, that's how it goes

 

I know little about it, but is the aim of an artist to make his work unique yet keep his his rep dry as jerking off with sand paper?

 

Dont most artists survive on the myth of who they are, and with writers there is no reason to take yourself so serious or change the identity of what you do. When you write on something you control your image, be it the goof ball with bubbles and weird cultural referances, or the hyper technical dark stuff - either way your bio is yours to make, don't front because you have an art show.

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only because bojangles had the balls to post his...

 

Drift began doing illegal graffiti in New York in 1992 at the age of 14. For over a decade, Drift's path in life took him in and out of art school and numerous work experiences. Illegal graffiti and spraycan art, however, remained his creative passion. Following his second arrest and conviction of vandalism in 2002, Drift began to redirect his energies into commercial art in and attempt to stabilize his life. Despite his fear of New York City's "3 Strikes" campaign, an aggressive attempt to deter graffiti artists from vandalism by charging third time offenders with a felony offense, Drift found it difficult to give up his passion and remained semi-active in New York’s graffiti culture. In September of 2002 Drift was offered a position as the art director of a Hong Kong based toy manufacturing company. By December of 2002, Drift had relocated to Hong Kong, leaving the spraypaint in New York, and focused on his work in the toy industry. Drift has not indulged his passion for illegal graffiti in Hong Kong but continues to use spraypaint as his medium of choice when painting murals and canvases in his free time.

 

 

Artist Statement

 

"My life as an artist has been an ongoing struggle between my passion for non-commercial art and the need to compromise my passion in order to maintain the kind of lifestyle I think I want to have. This conflict dramatically effects the choices I make as an artist and person. This ongoing struggle is an undercurrent in all of my art and it is the primary theme of my artwork in the "BURN" exhibition."

 

 

Price List:

All prices in HKD

 

“Cry Me a River” - spraypaint on canvas: $30,000

 

“Don’t Quit Your Day Job” - spraypaint mural/installation: $120,000

 

(the artist will provide photo and video documentation on the creation of

the piece and signed documentation. The artist will recreate the mural

on location at a site of the buyers specification)

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Damn dude that's some baller price points.

 

 

*Oh, I missed the HKD. How much is that in USD? Good luck BTW. OMG

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