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So uh I'm a little late on planning....


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Originally posted by BEEFEATER@Mar 22 2006, 12:17 AM

yeah take any of the 1,2,4,5,6 trains into the Bronx and watch the tracksides/rooftops ;) (You're welcome for the decoration)

 

But basically it's more fun to ride through the tunnels trying to catch the gems in there, most rooftops are bland.

for sure. I'm planning on taking tons of flics, so thanks for a little dirrection on what to take.

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Originally posted by Shark Hammil@Mar 22 2006, 12:21 AM

Take the A out to Far Rock at 11pm, get off at the second to last stop, walk around.

this could a.) either be great advice b.) be the worst advice ever.

 

maybe if it was a little more descriptive or i knew more about ny i could make a decision on a or b... but ill take you word and check it out...

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Originally posted by WeakSauce+Mar 22 2006, 12:32 AM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (WeakSauce - Mar 22 2006, 12:32 AM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Shark Hammil@Mar 22 2006, 12:21 AM

Take the A out to Far Rock at 11pm, get off at the second to last stop, walk around.

this could a.) either be great advice b.) be the worst advice ever.

 

maybe if it was a little more descriptive or i knew more about ny i could make a decision on a or b... but ill take you word and check it out...

[/b]

 

 

It's the best advice ever.

Be sure to have all your money on you .

And camera.

 

 

Actually, maybe the 3rd to last stop.....

 

 

Also, do alot of back to back fillins on Canal. It's real chill over there.

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Beef's right. Queens is pretty much a waste of time. You can go down to Corona and kick it with my boy Patrick. He's usually chilling in his van two blocks east of the stop... other than that, I don't know what you do there. And I lived there for 3 years.

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Originally posted by KING BLING@Mar 21 2006, 11:56 PM

Go to Chelsea and hit up some galleries - than hit up the bars...</no homo>

 

Bars shouldn't be that hard to get in, just don't dress like a slouch and have an acne break out

 

Don't be afraid, go hit up the Bronx. Bring your camera.

 

All the pizza is good. Go to Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn or any other Italian neighborhood and get a meal or three - maybe even ask locals for recomendations, but make sure its not a hipster.

 

I assume you're not coming up from Philly where you'd be familiar with it - so buy an egg, bacon and cheese sandwhich every morning

 

Go shopping at Century 21 is you're into designer stuff - they have decent prices on clothes you'd spend a lot more onelsewhere. Go home with an expensive shirt just because.

 

Go to the new Guggenheim or the Met

 

Get lost on purpose and spend a lot of time on the subways in the front car if it has a window facing out in the front.

 

Go shopping on Canal Street

 

I don't know - thats what I came up with off the top of my head. I miss the East Coast

 

I'd ignore pretty much everything else in this thread, and print a copy of this post to keep in your pocket.

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"dont be afraid go to the Bronx"

 

What the fuck is there to be afraid of?

 

A hood is a hood.

 

If you got punch appeal, dont be walking around alone at night looking like a goober.

 

 

Still, Hell's Gate. Which I doubt 90% of these people know.

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Originally posted by Spuds Mckenzie@Mar 22 2006, 01:17 PM

If you dont go to Brooklyn, then you didnt really go to NYC. And no, Williamsburg does not count. When in Brooklyn check out BAM, The Brooklyn Museum and of course the hoods. And of course, paint.

 

WHAT? :haha: BROOKLYN IS ABSOLUTE GARBAGE B. DONT EVEN TOUCH DOWN IN BROOKLYN, ITS NOT BROOKLYN IN 97, ITS WHITEPEOPLE BROOKLYN NOW. DONT EVEN BOTHER B. WHEN YOU CAN GET OFF AT GATES AND SEE NIGGAS SHOOTING A SKATEBOARDING VIDEO, YOU KNOW SHIT IS DONE FOR IN THE HOOD. ACTUALLY...THAT SAID, HIT UP BROOKLYN, YOU'LL LOVE IT.

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Originally posted by KING BLING@Mar 21 2006, 11:56 PM

All the pizza is good. Go to Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn or any other Italian neighborhood and get a meal or three - maybe even ask locals for recomendations, but make sure its not a hipster.

 

 

There are good "by the slice" shops all over New York. For a visitor, I would advise never getting more than one slice per spot, as you can just eat it while you walk around, and then get another at the next place you see, thereby getting to try a lot of different kinds. If it's too big to eat, fold it in half, and let the grease run off for a minute.

 

For an exception to this rule, and the best pizza anywhere, take an F train to the Bergen street stop (about ten minutes from the lower East side), then hit up Casserta Vechia on Smith for dinner. By all accounts, it's like eating in Italy. Spring for the whole wheat crust, it's $2 more but it's well worth it. There are also a few cool bars in the area, and you probably won't get carded unless you or someone you're with looks really young. Spots get pretty crowded from about 9-2 on the weekends, but it would be a wasted trip to New York if you didn't stay out until 4 AM drinking.

 

I'd do this on the way back from Coney Island, which is a fun ride as well as a fun destination. The F train goes above ground starting at Smith and 9th, a short walk from the aforementioned pizza spot, and actually reaches the highest point on all of New York's elevated lines. You can see most of Brooklyn, the Hudson, the statue of liberty, and a ton of graffiti. When you get there, there are a bunch of carnival style booths, skee ball, rides, a boardwalk, old hispanic women selling homemade churros (highly reccomended), excellent french fries, a block long Os Gemeos mural, handpainted signs by ESPO, KR, and numerous others, and a game called SHOOT THE FREAK, where people pay to shoot some poor sap with a paintball gun. Definitely go watch this. A lady I know once paid him $80 extra to not wear any padding.

 

Check this site for good parties, drink deals, etc. Most of them are in Williamsburgh (which I rarely visit, but I have to say is for the most part not as bad as it's made out to be) or the lower East side. If you want to bar hop, I'd reccomend one of these two neighborhoods. Both are filled with young people, relatively cheap bars, and graffiti. Of course, this makes them a breeding ground for hipsters, but they can be avoided if that bothers you.

 

Wear comfortable shoes, and try to change them at some point in the day. Whenever people visit NYC, they complain about their feet and legs hurting from walking so much. Pussies.

 

Oh, yeah, definitely walk across a bridge. The Brooklyn bridge is a nice walk, but there won't be much for you to do on either end. The Williamsburgh bridge is probably the better bet, as both ends of it are pretty lively. Just don't do this too late at night.

 

Take trains to get everywhere that you can't just walk, until midnight or so. Then it's worth springing for a cab.

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From the Village Voice:

 

Words of the Prophets Take to the Rooftops

by Cathy Hong

 

SUBJECT — The Extreme Graffiti Hall of Murals

LOCATION — Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens

Les had no equipment but a backpack full of spray cans. (He admits he's tried on a harness. "But fuck no, I never used it.") He scoped out the Manhattan Bridge and found a flimsy drainpipe the width of a garden hose that ran up the massive pier. Les climbed a good 30 feet up and found the seven-inch catwalk that encircles the middle of the pier. He stepped onto the ledge and crept along carefully, leaning his body into the wall so he didn't fall—one slip meant a long ride down to the craggy rocks below. Still balancing as if on a tightrope, he sprayed his name in a wide, arcing motion so his silver tag was seven feet tall, huge enough to be seen by a driver stuck on the BQE.

 

Even Bloomberg's vandal squad wanted to know how Les pulled off his graffiti on the bridge, but he wouldn't fess up. When I asked, he shrugged his shoulders like it was a stroll in the park: "I just did it. It was easy."

 

Les is an "extreme graffiti writer," that is, one who prefers bombing hard-to-reach billboards, bridges, rooftops, and freeway signs. Ever since graff writers were barred from trains, they've gone underground by going way above. For them, it's not about flashy, spiraling letters but the reckless stunt, the adrenaline, and the property that you hit. "It's supposed to be ugly and grimy. It's city," says Hugo Martinez, a graffiti gallerist.

 

In the macho hierarchy of the New York graffiti world, Les is a top dog. But the guy who gets the most props is JA, a veteran adrenaline junkie who can shimmy up a 30-foot pole and bomb a freeway billboard in 10 minutes flat. Other respected extreme writers include Si, Set Up, Darks, and Kez 5. Much of their work is transient: Here today, gone tomorrow. But here are some routes (elevated trains are the best transports) to their neck-straining canvases.

 

J/Z: This skanky ghost line gives you the best views of rooftop graffiti. Since the trains head toward a no-man's-land of Hasids and hipsters, these tags are less likely to get buffed (painted over by city workers), although they might get ragged (written over by rival crews). If you're Brooklyn-bound, there are choice sites on the Williamsburg Bridge, like the giant REVS PEAK that's painted with a roller in the middle of a loft building. Just before the end of the bridge, to your right, you can also see Set Up's black swooping logos scrolling across the top of an abandoned brick building.

 

Past the bridge, the best J/Z sites are between Marcy Avenue and Broadway Junction. Les and his crew mercilessly bombed this route, hitting phone boxes, tracks, and the backs of billboards. The Myrtle Avenue station has a particularly melancholy air of urban devastation: rust-hemorrhaging billboards and back lots piled high with plastic bottles and dead refrigerators—an ideal setting for writers. A lot of graff that floats on the shredded edifices around the Myrtle stop are "pieces" (three colors or more). They've been ragged so many times that the names have faded and bled together into a palimpsest of translucent specters.

 

7 TRAIN: As that grand old No. 7 train rattles toward Queensboro Plaza, you'll see the flashiest of legal graffiti sites—5 Pointz. This block-wide loft building is plastered with wildly angled graffiti, impressing the untrained eye. But if you mention 5 Pointz to serious graff writers, you can't scrub the scorn off their voices with steel wool. Legal graffiti means kindergarten. The best illegal spots in Queens are between Queensboro Plaza and Junction Blvd: The No. 7 train offers a patchwork of sagging rooftops marked with spastic throw-ups, most prolifically by Nato.

 

BQE: Despite their testosterone, writers can be cattier than a den full of sorority girls. They're always slagging each other off as "toy." It doesn't matter if the graffiti is in a good spot. If a writer is a newcomer, an out-of-towner, a trustafarian who hangs out in fancy L.E.S. sneaker stores—his work is toy. But on the BQE, graff artist Si isn't toy. His huge straight-letter logo, floating way high up on Brooklyn's Watchtower, is a middle finger to that Jehovah's Witness head-quarters. Another remarkable piece is the tag DEK PHAME in eye-popping blue and orange, between the exits for 39th and the Prospect Expressway.

 

DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN: "Upside-down rollers" are when writers, using buckets of acrylic paint instead of spray paint, hang over the roof and apply their logos to the building in blocky Etch A Sketch lettering. The most monumental, against a 12-story apartment on Canal Street and Broadway, blares SKREW/SACE. No longer pristine, it's already been ragged by none other than Les (in broad daylight, he boasts).

 

HELL GATE: A few months ago, right above the arch, Si painted an impressive piece on this massive bridge connecting Queens to the Bronx. He wreathed the top of the bridge's pillar with his fat six-foot-high logos. But Hell Gate is JA's property, JA says. He was the first to mark it up, back in the mid '90s. Recently, JA came back and wrote over some of it, an artist named MQ ragged it, and JA claimed it again. So now, like so many embattled city turfs, it's a clashing tangle of names.

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