Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Weapon X

DISNEY

Recommended Posts

Some of you may know that Disney has been getting rather trendy in the haute couture. Well, I been about that shit for a long, long time. Anyway, since it's out there, we'll be seeing more and more cool vintage designs by Disney in the not so distant future.

 

I, for one, am glad. There's gonna be a ton of archive digging for classic images, and you're crazy if you say that shit don't look good.

 

Here's an article I found: ----------

 

The Walt Disney Co. is taking consumers down the rabbit hole to a land where crystal-studded Mickey Mouse T-shirts cost $US1400, Tinkerbell earrings run $US630, and a Cheshire Cat wrap sells for $US500 - and consumers are gladly paying.

 

Disney's consumer division, better known for peddling kid-oriented fashions at Wal-Mart in the US, has been cashing in on a hot trend in haute couture for vintage art.

 

The company has sold $US200 million in high-end and adult apparel featuring classic images of Mickey Mouse and his cartoon friends since 2003, and says it sees no sign that interest is flagging.

 

This year, Disney positioned itself for the first time as a fashion player, hosting previews of its Alice In Wonderland-inspired lines of clothing, home decor and accessories at two star-studded events during Fashion Week in Los Angeles.

 

Andy Mooney, chairman of consumer products, started Disney couture about five years ago after walking through the company's archives with Disney historian Dave Smith and finding a treasure trove of images - some of which have never been seen. He offered licences for the classic studio art to fashion designers in hopes of adding vogue to the middle-class brand.

 

Advertisement:

"With a lot of the higher-end items, we were trying to spread goodwill," Mooney told Reuters. "We did start this with the notion of it being a brand enhancer but it has turned out to be quite a healthy business."

 

The key to Disney's success as a luxury brand comes mainly from its association with brands that already have cachet, said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a research group that focuses on America's wealthy.

 

"I think it's just a pendulum swinging back to the classics, and Disney is a true American and global classic," Pedraza said. "To the extent they license to other luxury brands they can be successful. Disney alone would not be as powerful."

 

Designer Jackie Brander was among the first to license vintage Mickey drawings for her chic boutique in the trendy Fred Segal store in Santa ----------------Monica, California. Dolce & Gabbana followed with a crystal-studded Mickey T-shirt, which sold in the shops for $US1400 and flew off shelves.

 

Disney moved into home decor and accessories this year after seeing references to its 1951 animated classic, Alice In Wonderland, appear in the pages of fashion magazines and on TV - notably in a Gwen Stefani music video in spring 2005.

 

"When that begins to happen you just have to pay attention to the call of what's going on in society," Dennis Green, senior vice president of marketing for consumer products, said at the company's Mad Hatter Tea Party on Sunday.

 

The targets of the new campaign, Green said, are luxury-loving teen-agers and young adults in New York, Los Angeles, London and Tokyo who "are driving the fashion industry all over the world."

 

"If we did national TV ads going after teenagers, they would turn us off. They would think we were uncool," he said.

 

"Teenagers have to discover the product. (Then) they tell their friends and it grows through a grass roots marketing effort" that Disney could never have developed on its own, he noted.

 

Disney has licensed Alice and other Wonderland characters from studio art done by Mary Blair and David Hall for lines of fabric, tableware, carpet tiles, decorative pillows and throws, jewellery and clothing.

 

It has hired Kidada Jones, daughter of music legend Quincy Jones to design a line of jewellery, cashmere throws and pillows, and to dress her celebrity friends in the posh items.

 

The Alice line will appear in high-end US shops such as Fred Segal, Drexel Heritage, Zelen, and specialty retailers starting next spring.

 

One thing I saw was a table that had a card theme, a la Alice in Wonderland. I'd love to have that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, who remembers when the thing was to wear those huge Warner Bros. shirts with like.... Bugs and Taz on the front all thugged out, and the back of the shirt was the back of them?

 

God that was so stupid....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stupid-great. Whats also great is the article i read in the ny times a couple years ago describing how a t-shirt with micky playing guitar sells (at the time im sure) for 1500 bucks to silly japanese people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest KING BLING
Originally posted by Weapon X@Oct 19 2005, 09:54 AM

Some of you may know that Disney has been getting rather trendy in the haute couture.

 

 

The only people who would spend actual loot on this are stupid trend whores. If you want to be ironic go on a mission to a flea market and find an actual old school or otherwise unique disney piece - not an over priced shit shirt qwith mickey on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by KING BLING+Nov 1 2005, 04:08 AM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (KING BLING - Nov 1 2005, 04:08 AM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Weapon X@Oct 19 2005, 09:54 AM

Some of you may know that Disney has been getting rather trendy in the haute couture.

 

 

The only people who would spend actual loot on this are stupid trend whores. If you want to be ironic go on a mission to a flea market and find an actual old school or otherwise unique disney piece - not an over priced shit shirt qwith mickey on it.

[/b]

 

But there's more...like Mad Hatter bedsheets and such. And they are digging in the archives for "unique" art. But I agree, I wouldn't be paying three grand for a Mickey Mouse shirt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register for a 12ozProphet forum account or sign in to comment

You need to be a forum member in order to comment. Forum accounts are separate from shop accounts.

Create an account

Register to become a 12ozProphet forum member.

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×