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Vanity

Fish to avoid

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after hearing/reading multiple accounts of how 90% of the Ocean's Large Fish are Gone , I decided to do a little research of my own into the subject and came across this list of fish to avoid courtesy of:

card1.gif

 

sorry about the formatting

 

Enjoy:

 

Catfish (farmed)

In the U.S., these vegetarian fish are farmed in freshwater ponds with minimal environmental impact.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Caviar (farmed)

Caviars from farmed white sturgeon and paddlefish are farmed using environmentally responsible methods and are proving to be popular alternatives to traditional caviars from imperiled Caspian Sea sturgeons. In addition, roes from farmed rainbow trout and wild Alaska salmon are ocean-friendly and affordable alternatives to Caspian caviars.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Seafood Choices Alliance

 

Clams (farmed)

Clams are filter feeders and so do not require wild fish for feed; in fact, these species can improve water quality.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Crab: Dungeness, Snow (Canada), Stone

The West Coast Dungeness crab fishery is acknowledged by some experts as the most sustainable large-scale commercial crab fishery in the world. Only male crabs above a minimum size are kept and fishing is prohibited during the breeding season. The snow crab fishery is also well-regulated, targeting only healthy populations. The stone crab fishery in Florida (or South Atlantic) is likewise environmentally responsible as only one claw is taken at a time and the crab lives to regenerate a new one. All three fisheries use extremely selective traps, taking little bycatch.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Halibut: Pacific

Pacific halibut are considered abundant and international management of this fishery is strong. They are caught in the waters of Alaska using longlines set on the ocean bottom, a very selective method.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Mussels (farmed)

Mussels are filter feeders and so do not require wild fish for feed; in fact, these species can improve water quality. Farming shellfish in nets, trays, or racks suspended in the water column is an ocean-friendly alternative to dredging.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Oysters (farmed)

Oysters are filter feeders and so do not require wild fish for feed; in fact, these species can improve water quality. Farming shellfish in nets, trays, or racks suspended in the water column is an ocean-friendly alternative to dredging.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Seafood Choices Alliance

 

Sablefish/Black Cod (Alaska)

Sablefish populations are rebounding from overfishing in the 1980s and it is now a well-managed fishery. Sablefish are taken in Alaska by longlines set on the ocean bottom, while in British Columbia traps are the predominant method. There is little bycatch with these methods.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Salmon (wild from Alaska) * Fresh or canned, including chinook (king), coho, sockeye, pink, and chum salmon.

90% of the wild salmon caught in the U.S. comes from Alaska where populations of all five species are abundant, even though there are some habitat and other problems with hatcherie to the south. Overall, Alaska's wild salmon fisheries are well managed and most of their spawing rivers and streams are healthy.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Sardines

Sardines are extremely prolific fishes, able to withstand significant fishing pressures. Also, catch methods are selective so there is little bycatch of other marine life.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Scallops: Bay

Bay scallops filter feed and do not require wild fish for feed. Farming these species can improve the surrounding water quality. Farming shellfish in nets, trays, or racks suspended in the water column is an ocean-friendly alternative to dredging. A wild scallop fishery does exist in Nantucket Bay. While dredging for wild scallops can be harmful to certain seafloor habitats, some fishermen use other techniques, like diving and dip-nets, that are low-impact methods.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Striped bass/Atlantic rockfish (farmed and wild*)

In the wild, striped bass along the Atlantic coast were formally declared "restored" in 1995 after being severely depleted during the 1980s. Almost all striped bass farming operations use land-based systems with minimal environmental impact.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

*Click here to learn more about health concerns associated with eating wild striped bass.

 

Sturgeon (farmed)

Farming certain species of sturgeon are environmentally responsible alternatives to catching wild, imperiled sturgeon. In the U.S., farmed sturgeon are raised inland with little environmental impact.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Tilapia (US farmed)

In the U.S., most tilapia farms utilize enclosed systems and water controls to prevent water pollution, escapes and conflicts with other wildlife.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Back to the top

 

Avoid:

 

Caviar (wild)

Overfishing, poaching, and illegal trade (fueled by the exorbitant prices Caspian Sea caviars command) have contributed to the dramatic decline of sturgeon populations in the Caspian Sea. While sturgeon from this region still account for 60% of the world's caviar supply, catches have dropped significantly; in the last twenty years, beluga sturgeon populations have decreased 90%.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

Seafood Choices Alliance

 

Chilean Sea Bass/Toothfish

Illegal and unregulated fishing of Chilean sea bass, which has already wiped out some local populations, puts this species at risk of commercial extinction after just ten years on the U.S. market. Bycatch of seabirds is a significant problem.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Cod: Atlantic

One of the world's most important fisheries since the 1500s, cod is now but a shadow of itself. Industrial fishing and poor management in just the last 50 years has fueled its collapse in many areas. All Atlantic cod stocks, save one, are significantly depleted.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Grouper*

Overfishing has caused a collapse of many species of groupers in the Gulf of Mexico, where much of the grouper sold in the U.S. originates.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

*Click here to learn more about health concerns associated with eating grouper

 

Halibut: Atlantic

Atlantic halibut was once common in U.S. waters but are now very rare. In the 1950s, Atlantic halibut landings peaked at almost 25,000,000 pounds; in 1999 landings were approximately 25,000 pounds.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Monkfish/Goosefish

Populations of monkfish in the Atlantic are declining due to intense fishing pressure. Also, bottom-trawling capture methods damage seafloor habitats.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Orange Roughy*

Orange roughy are slow growing, do not reach sexual maturity until well into their twenties, and produce low numbers of eggs, making populations extremely vulnerable to overfishing. Additionally, deep-water trawling can destroy valuable cold-water coral formations and habitat.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

*Click here to learn more about health concerns associated with eating orange roughy.

 

Rock cod/Pacific rockfish*

Many rockfish species sold as "Pacific snapper" are long-lived and slow-growing. Some species do not mature until age 20 and most are subjected to heavy fishing. As a result, most West Coast rockfish populations are depleted.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

*Click here to learn more about health concerns associated with eating Pacific rockfish.

 

Salmon (farmed or Atlantic)*

There are numerous problems associated with salmon aquaculture operations including: pollution (i.e., waste material), the use of high amounts of wild-caught fish as feed, and effects on wild fish populations associated with escapes of farmed fish (e.g., disease transfer, interbreeding).

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Shark*

Because sharks grow slowly, mature at a late age and produce few offspring, they are vulnerable to fishing pressure.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

*Click here to learn more about health concerns associated with eating shark.

 

Shrimp (imported, farmed and wild)

Wild shrimp capture techniques are wasteful, taking at least three pounds of unwanted catch for every pound of shrimp caught. Most shrimp farming operations destroy coastal habitats which also harm local fisheries.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Snapper

Many global snapper populations are overfished and depleted, and frequently taken as bycatch in other fisheries, such as shrimp trawling. Also, fishing techniques frequently damage seafloor ecosystems.

Blue Ocean Institute

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Sturgeon (wild)

Various wild populations of sturgeon are imperiled in North America and the Caspian Sea, where these ancient fish face the quadruple threat of overfishing, loss of habitat, restricted access to spawning areas because of dams, and pollution.

Environmental Defense

Monterey Bay Aquarium

 

Tuna: Bluefin*

Bluefin tuna are long lived and slow to reproduce, making them particularly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Atlantic and southern Pacific bluefin populations are severely depleted.

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shorthand:

 

Enjoy

 

Catfish (farmed)

Caviar (farmed)

Clams (farmed)

Crab: Dungeness, Snow (Canada), Stone

Halibut: Pacific

Mussels (farmed)

Oysters (farmed)

Sablefish/Black Cod (Alaska)

Salmon (wild from Alaska)

Sardines

Scallops: Bay

Striped bass/Atlantic rockfish

Sturgeon (farmed)

Tilapia (US farmed)

 

Avoid

 

Caviar (wild)

Chilean Sea Bass/Toothfish

Cod: Atlantic

Grouper

Halibut: Atlantic

Monkfish/Goosefish

Orange Roughy

Rock cod/Pacific rockfish

Salmon (farmed or Atlantic)

Shark

Shrimp (imported, farmed and wild)

Snapper

Sturgeon (wild)

Tuna: Bluefin

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i could go on for days about the gross mismanagement of our natural recources (including livestock/fish)

but it would only get me angry to the blackout point... being a vegitarian is easier...

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Thanks for that.... fish has become a more important part of my diet for the beneficial health effects and the fact that I'm trying to avoid eating cows.

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I will eat mussels, squid, clams..etc.

 

Yet under no circumstance will I eat any type of fish.

Ate some bad tuna last year and was unable to stop puking and shitting for 3 days straight. Ended up in the hospital on some skeleton shit. Not good.

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im no expert but i was operating under the crucible that you may want to avoid eating predatory fish species. These guys eat smaller fish. Each time it eats another fish it absorbs more mercury/heavy metals. These compounds get caught in and build up inside the fish making it unsafe to eat. Fish that feed on sea vegetation also contain mercury but to a far lesser extent. Instead of having 100 fishes worth of mercury built up inside them they have 1 fish worth.

Forgive me if im wrong here!!!

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myanmar-u45.jpg

 

Rock Fish

 

876-19%20Lion%20Fish%20L.jpg

 

Lion Fish

 

Barracuda.sized.jpg

 

Barracuda

 

puffer_600.jpg

 

Puffer Fish

 

wolf%20eel3.jpg

 

Wolf Eel

 

piranhas.jpg

 

Piranhas

 

 

THESE ARE THE ONES YOU REALLY WANNA AVOID

unless u wanna get fucked up proper

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i just want to know, arcel, how in the fuck are you going to have a vaguely threatening demon???

i would think a demon would be distinctly threatening

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Its looks more like a sperm then a vaguely threatening demon

 

seeing as we all love fish, and last time i posted this flick no one gave these gropers (that a friendly neighbour caught) the respect the deserve:

 

CIMG1909.jpg

 

word

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Well I'm doing my part to save the fishies since I don't eat anything that comes from the ocean, it is all sickening to me. Fish sticks used to rock when I was 6 though.

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Its funny some of you say you can't handle eating fish, and then you talk about eating the most foul fish creation ever: the fish stick.

I guess if I lived in a place where fish weren't being caught fresh daily, I probably wouldn't eat it either.

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I can't handle fish man

the things creep me out way too bad to eat

not to mention sea life is the bottom feeders mang - > fuck that shit

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Originally posted by JohnnyHorton@Aug 31 2005, 06:25 AM

i just want to know, arcel, how in the fuck are you going to have a vaguely threatening demon???

i would think a demon would be distinctly threatening

 

Not necissarily, Some of them are just mischief makers , like pranksters and jokers. I've done some considerable research on this subject , cross refrenced with many different cultures ideas about demons.

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