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SeezurSalad

Referring to America as AmeriKKKa

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your either on the side of the suicide bombing,grenade launching terrorists or your on the side of the beer swilling, shoot em up bang bang, occupying robot militia.

 

tough choice when things are so clear cut.

 

And I beleive this term came along when good ole upstanding amerikkkan citizens started lynchin naggers BOY!

so don't you forget your heritage!

 

P.S. Racism is still alive and well in the south.

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Racism is starting to be alive and well on 12oz prophet too, and it isn't being spewed by the Americans.

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LOL LOL LOL. Touche'.

 

Actually, the "AmeriKKKa" thing started back in the 1960's during the Vietnam War protests. It was considered to be "over the top" even back then. It was popularized by Abbie Hoffman and the Youth International Party, better known to history as the "Yippies!", a spin-off of the word "hippie". And from Yippie!, we got "yuppie," (Young Urban Professional) the opposite of the crazy, street-theatre, pot-smoking, commune-living Yippies! The yuppies represented the overly-materialistic, Harvard MBA, strive-for-success young professionals. Then we got "guppies" (Gay Urban Professional), then came the DINKs (double-income, no kids.)

 

I actually met Abbie Hoffman once, at an anti-war rally on the Hill at Miller Theatre in Hermann Park, in Houston. I was on the incredibly amateurish "security team" surrounding Hoffman, because the Klan had threatened to kill him. At that same demonstration, two guys I knew from SDS, Thorne Dreyer and a guy named Cam captured a well-known Klan activist, Louis Beam, who showed up at the demonstration wearing a buzz haircut , a Klan t-shirt and spit-shined jump boots. They held him in a full-nelson while a female Space City! photographer took his picture. Boy, was he pissed. They published the picture in Space City! as part of an article on Abbie Hoffman's appearance at the demonstration.

 

Louis Beam is the Klan leader who popularized the theory of "leaderless resistance" among the racist right-wing. Despite his ignorant, redneck background, he turned out to be pretty smart when it comes to tactics. Leaderless resistance works very well, and has been adopted by many other political movements, including anti-globalization groups, "Earth First!", ALF and others. These organizations are extremely difficult to penetrate, because they all use Louis Beam's idea, probably without realizing where it came from.

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Actually, it seems better published on here than it really was. We would go to a demonstration, get all pumped up, shout slogans that seem incredibly inane now, wind up punching it out with the Klan or the Nazis, and then later had the feeling that the entire thing was an exercise in futility.

 

The demonstrations in Seattle (and other places) against globalization and NAFTA kind of have the same spirit as the anti-Vietnam War demonstrations, only smaller. The biggest anti-war demonstration I was ever in was in Los Angeles, in April 1971. There were more than 20,000 people there. That same weekend, in New York, there was an even bigger march with probably somewhere around 100,000. These marches were organized by a group I found out later (much to my disgust) that was infiltrated and controlled by the Trotskyist "Socialist Workers' Party," called New Mobilization Against the War, or "New Mobe" for short. After the LA march, I went to Chicago, to the IWW headquarters and lived in the "dormitory" for a few weeks, and then was sent back to Long Beach, CA, to help with the wildcat strike at International Wood Products, when the strikers voted to join the I.W.W. Three organizers were sent from Chicago--me, a British guy named Graham, and a local Chicago guy named John. I'd like to say we did a great job, but in reality it was a clusterfuck from the very start.

 

Most of the time when you are participating in some moment in history it doesn't seem all that momentous. Thirty years later, people are going "Wow! You were at Century City Plaza?" But when it's happening all you can see is people running, girls screaming, and tear gas. You see somebody fall down, help them up and say "The pigs have gone nuts! RUN!" and later she says "Thank you, thank you, you saved my life, I thought I was going to get trampled!" but in reality, it was no big deal. She just fell down and you helped her up.

 

The whole time the Sixties were going on, I kept thinking I was missing out on all the really good shit. I didn't go to Woodstock. I wasn't at the Battle of Telegraph Avenue (in Berkeley.) I didn't get to go to the Chicago Democratic National Convention in 1968 (I tried, my Mom found out and stopped me. I was 17.) I always felt that Houston was a backwater and that we were just wasting our time marching in demonstrations here, or in Austin. But years later, when I talked to other anti-war protestors, they would say things like "Oh, yeah, we marched all the time. But it wasn't the same as Down South, where you had to fight the Klan and all that. It was a cakewalk up here." The grass is always greener, I guess.

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Originally posted by Biggus Dickus@Jul 23 2005, 02:39 PM

Racism is starting to be alive and well on 12oz prophet too, and it isn't being spewed by the Americans.

 

 

Just for the record, I am american , And I was being sarcastic.

I am far from a racist

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Originally posted by Dawood@Jul 23 2005, 02:24 PM

P.S. Racism is still alive and well in the south.

 

Actually I've been through the south and I didn't see anywhere near the amount of racism I see at home here in Philly. The black people here are racist as fuck! :yuck:

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Kabar - if your 1969 self met your 2005 self, what would the 1969 self think?

 

Note: this isn't meant as a slight or anything of the sort - I'm actually curious.

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LOL! the 1969 Kabar woulda tackled the 2005 Kabar and held him in a full-nelson while his reporter freind took pictures of the ordeal for an activist magazine! :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

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And 1975 hobo kabar would have snuck in and stole both their wallets while they were distracted.

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Originally posted by KaBar2@Jul 23 2005, 01:02 PM

LOL LOL LOL. Touche'.

 

Actually, the "AmeriKKKa" thing started back in the 1960's during the Vietnam War protests. It was considered to be "over the top" even back then. It was popularized by Abbie Hoffman and the Youth International Party, better known to history as the "Yippies!", a spin-off of the word "hippie". And from Yippie!, we got "yuppie," (Young Urban Professional) the opposite of the crazy, street-theatre, pot-smoking, commune-living Yippies! The yuppies represented the overly-materialistic, Harvard MBA, strive-for-success young professionals. Then we got "guppies" (Gay Urban Professional), then came the DINKs (double-income, no kids.)

 

I actually met Abbie Hoffman once, at an anti-war rally on the Hill at Miller Theatre in Hermann Park, in Houston. I was on the incredibly amateurish "security team" surrounding Hoffman, because the Klan had threatened to kill him. At that same demonstration, two guys I knew from SDS, Thorne Dreyer and a guy named Cam captured a well-known Klan activist, Louis Beam, who showed up at the demonstration wearing a buzz haircut , a Klan t-shirt and spit-shined jump boots. They held him in a full-nelson while a female Space City! photographer took his picture. Boy, was he pissed. They published the picture in Space City! as part of an article on Abbie Hoffman's appearance at the demonstration.

 

Louis Beam is the Klan leader who popularized the theory of "leaderless resistance" among the racist right-wing. Despite his ignorant, redneck background, he turned out to be pretty smart when it comes to tactics. Leaderless resistance works very well, and has been adopted by many other political movements, including anti-globalization groups, "Earth First!", ALF and others. These organizations are extremely difficult to penetrate, because they all use Louis Beam's idea, probably without realizing where it came from.

 

good show kabar.

peace.

 

ps - was abbie an asshole?

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Poop Man Bob---

That is a very insightful question to ask. I was very immature for my age, and remained sort of adolescent well into my twenties. Probably, if my 1969 self met my 2005 self, he would be very disappointed. He would accuse the 2005 Kabar of "selling out," of "lacking genuine revolutionary committment." I held out a lot longer than most of my peers, trying to "make the Revolution." By the time I finally threw in the towel, most of my buddies had gone to college, married, and were having children. Like I've said before, it was kind of like some old Japanese soldier walking out of the forest on Mindinao to surrender his rusty rifle to a Filipino post office letter carrier.

 

When I came back off the road in about 1974, an old friend of mine named Mary Jane heard I was back in town and came to see me. I called her "Em Jay."(She had been a young, married, 25-year old Youth leader in the Unitarian church that I attended when I was a teenager.)

 

We had been involved for a while after she divorced her first husband, and she was still carrying a bit of a torch for me. I guess she had been waiting for me, hoping I would "grow out" of drifting around the country and focusing my life on anarchist politics. I think she was hoping we might actually be able to make a real adult life together.

 

We were sitting on the front steps of the place where I was staying, drinking beer and talking, and I got off onto an anarchist rant about mainstream politics. M.J. just looked away and sighed, and then when I wound down, she said sadly "You haven't changed a bit since you were eighteen. It's a lost cause, can't you see that?" The crazy thing was, up until that very moment, I couldn't see it. She poured out her beer, got in her car and drove away.

 

Suddenly, I could see myself and my life through her eyes, and it was pathetic. She pitied me, that I couldn't shake it, couldn't grow up. Despite the fact that we cared a lot for each other, she was not going to let herself get involved in a relationship with a man who was essentially still an adolescent. I can't say as I blame her. She was right. I was wrong.

 

The 1969 Kabar was full of anger, fighting mad, ready to man the barricades and "bring the War home." The 2005 Kabar has been to see the elephant. He knows better now. Lost causes just remain lost. Life is too short for bullshit. It's time to be real.

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Thanks for the response.

 

 

Originally posted by KaBar2@Jul 24 2005, 07:06 PM

Like I've said before, it was kind of like some old Japanese soldier walking out of the forest on Mindinao to surrender his rusty rifle to a Filipino post office letter carrier.

And I love that story. It's pretty fucking amazing. Read about it here.

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Originally posted by KaBar2@Jul 24 2005, 06:06 PM

When I came back off the road in about 1974, an old friend of mine named Mary Jane heard I was back in town and came to see me. I called her "Em Jay."(She had been a young, married, 25-year old Youth leader in the Unitarian church that I attended when I was a teenager.)

 

OMG Kabar is spiderman.

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i take kabars approach on this, ive said it before in other threads about fighting the "man, President" corporations and shit like that.

 

the only thing that makes change is a bullet. simple. pots and pans revolutions dont work nowadays. (did they ever? )

 

i like your story's kabar. shit brings a tear to my eye.

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Originally posted by oneeightyone@Jul 25 2005, 10:46 AM

i take kabars approach on this, ive said it before in other threads about fighting the "man, President" corporations and shit like that.

 

the only thing that makes change is a bullet. simple. pots and pans revolutions dont work nowadays. (did they ever? )

 

i like your story's kabar. shit brings a tear to my eye.

 

 

Haha... I've got to wonder sometimes....

 

Though I wouldn't say all of that was for naught Kabar. Alot of great social progress was made in the sixties. Perhaps not to the ideals to which you were aspiring but great, monumental amounts of progress was made. It was a fight, and there was alot of sacrifice, including a president. But it has improved the lot of us. Everyone wants to lay down arms and live the Amerikkklan dream (I can say Amerikkka can't I? It's still a free country... I think). The house, the picket fence, the two car garage, the trophy wife, the 2.5 kids, the family dog.... Who wouldn't want that? It's just some people realize it's a sham... Some people can't even achieve it in the first place.... But this happiness now is selling off our future. Like in the Devils Advocate, they are selling us a future that doesn't exist.... why? Because we are destroying it. Until ecology and economy are harmonized we will continue to spiral into entropy. Simple as that, and anyone with their ear to the ground and their nose in the wind knows this. So I admire anyone who fights the good fight, instead of succumbing to this succubus of sensual slavery, this earthly, materialistic ideal that we are trained to keep our eyes on, at the detriment of all else. We, especially of the United Snakes, who are indoctrinated into the ideology of Capital, the superiority of the individual over the whole, and the continued commodification of everything around us, to the extent of water now, possibly even air in the future, or shelter from cosmic radiation, and so everything and everyone is subject to the supreme authority of the almighty dollar.

 

Don't ever forget what you were fighting for.... now that you are old, and settled, and comfortable, is when you are most vulnerable.

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gay

adj.

 

1. Of, relating to, or having a sexual orientation to persons of the same sex.

2. Showing or characterized by cheerfulness and lighthearted excitement; merry.

3. Bright or lively, especially in color: a gay, sunny room.

4. Given to social pleasures.

5. Dissolute; licentious.

 

 

referring to amerikkka is "gay"?

seems ok to me.

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