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SIELOETTE

how to be hipn'shit

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ummmm?

 

All-CITY When a writer or crew bombs all major subway lines

 

BEEF Disagreement or conflict.

 

BENCH (n) Subway station where writers congregate(¸ðÀÌ´Ù, ÁýÇÕÇÏ´Ù) and

watch trains. Benching (v) The act of watching trains.

 

BITE Plagiarism(Ç¥Àý, µµÀÛ)

 

BLOCK BUSTER Wide lettered piece stretching from end to end done below

window level on subway car.

 

BOMB Prolific(dzºÎÇÑ, ´ÙÀÛÀÇ) writing

 

BUFF Removal of writing/art work

 

THE BUFF The MTA's graffiti removal program

 

BURNER A technically and stylistically well-executed wild style piece.

Generally done in bright colors.

 

CAPS (Fat, skinny, German thin) Interchangeable spray-can nozzles fitted to

paint can to vary width of spray.

 

CLEAN TRAIN Current term for all New York City Subway cars. They are

difficult to hit and rarely go into service with writing on them.

 

COAL MINE Older IND and BMT (R1 -R9s) subway cars characterized by a

unpainted brown dusty surface. Retired from service in 1976.

See image at NYC Subway Resources.Photo by Doug Grotjahn. Collection of Joe

Testagrose

 

CREW Organized group of writers

 

CROSSING OUT To scribble(²ôÀû°Å¸®´Ù, ³«¼­ÇÏ´Ù) or write on someone else's

name. It is considered highly disrespectful.

 

DEF Excellent (derived from definite and death).

 

DESIGNS Polka dots, checkers(üũ¹«´Ì) stars swirls(¼Ò¿ëµ¹ÀÌ) are placed over

the fill-in to in hence and compliment fill-in . Designs are limited only by an

artists imagination and technical ability.

 

DING DONG Stainless-steel (R-46)subway car, so named for the bell that rings

alerting passengers of closing doors

 

DOPE Excellent, of the highest order

 

DOWN Part of a group or action

 

 

DT Plain cloths police officer or detective

 

5-O Slang for police. Derived form the television series Hawaii 5-O.

 

FADE Graduation of colors.

 

FAMLIES Rows of throw ups of the same name.

 

FLOATERS Throw ups done on subway car panels at window level.

 

FREIGHTS Railroad freight(È­¹°¿­Â÷) cars.

 

FLATS Painted steel subway cars with flat surfaces. (The preferred subway

cars of old school writers. During the 1970s the IRT division was composed

exclusively of flats)

 

GETTING UP When proliferation(Áõ½Ä, È®»ê) of name has led to high visibility.

 

GETTING OVER Succeeding

 

G0ING OVER Writing over another writers name. It is the ultimate act of

disrespect.

 

FILL-IN The base colors of a piece, falling within the outline.

 

HAND STYLE Handwriting(ÇÊÀû, ¼­Ã¼) or tagging style.

 

HEAD BUFF SPOT The portion(ºÎºÐ,¿î¸í) of wall panels of the subway car

interior above the seats located at passenger's head level. The mild though

frequent abrasion from passengers heads eventually buffs (removes) tags on

these locations.(It is an undesirable location to tag.)

 

HENRY SHOTS Photographic technique developed by Henry Chalfant. The

camera remains in one spot with automatic film advance while the subject (train)

moves. The end result is a straight forward single image built from several

frames providing more detail. Though the term is used infrequently the technique

has become one of the standards for photo documentation(Áõ°Å) of trains.

 

HIT (n) A tag, throw-up or piece (v) the act of writing.

 

INVENT Shoplifting(½½Â½ÇÏ´Ù) or stealing. This term was used prior to 1974

The contemporary(µ¿½Ã´ëÀÇ, ´ç´ëÀÇ) term is RACK.

 

KILL To bomb excessively.

 

KING The most accomplished writer in a given category.

 

LAY-UP A single or double track where trains are parked during off-peak

hours. Both tunnel and elevated(°í±ÍÇÑ, °í°¡Ã¶µµ) lay-ups exist.

 

LETTER LINES The IND and BMT divisions of The New York City Subway

 

MARRIED COUPLE Two subway cars permanently attached which share a

motor. Identified by their consecutive(¿¬¼ÓµÇ´Â, ÀÏ°ü¼ºÀÌ ¾ø´Â) numbers. These

cars were desirable(ÇÕ´çÇÑ) when art work on connected car was directly

relevant(ÀûÀýÇÑ, ¾î¿ï¸®´Â).

 

MOTION TAGGING Writing on subway cars while they are in service.

 

NUMBER LINES The IRT division of The New York City Subway

 

NEW SCHOOL Contemporary writing culture (post 1984)

This date can vary greatly depending upon who you ask.

 

OLD SCHOOL The writing culture prior to 1984

This date can vary greatly depending upon who you ask.

 

OUTLINE The skeleton or frame work of a piece FINAL OUTLINE: After

fill-in and designs have been applied the outline is re executed to define the letters.

 

PANEL PIECE A painting below the windows and between the doors of a

subway car.

 

PIECE A writer's painting, short for masterpiece.

 

PIECING The execution of a piece.

 

PIECE BOOK OR BLACK BOOK A writer's sketch book. Used for personal art

development and or the collection of other artists work.

 

PRODUCTION A writer's sketch book. Used for personal art

development and or the collection of other artists work.

 

PULL IN - PULL OUT This is essentially a five to fifteen minute layup. At

the end of some subway routes trains park in a tunnel for several minutes before going back into service. During this time the trains are written on. Due to time constraints(°­Á¦, ¾ïÁ¦) pull in - pull outs were generally utilized for throw ups.

It was one of the more dangerous approaches to writing.

 

RACKING OR RACKING UP Shoplifting or stealing.

 

RACK A store where shoplifting can be done.

 

RIDGIE Subway car with corrugated(°ñÀÌÁø), stainless-steel sides. An undesirable surface for burners. Ridgies ran on the BMT and IND divisions and were preferred by throw-up artists.

See image at NYC Subway Resources. Photo by Steve Zabel. Collection of Joe Testagrose

 

SCRATCHITI A media coined(»õ·Î¸¸µç) term for the scratchings rendered on to the windows of subway cars.

 

SLANTS IND R-40 subway cars with slanted(±â¿ï¾îÁø) face.

See image at NYC Subway Resources.Photo by Doug Grotjahn. Collection of Joe Testagrose

 

STEEL Any type of train. New school term used to distinguish train and wall work

 

THE SYSTEM The New York City Subway system

 

STYLE WARS 1. Competition between artists to determine superior creative ability.

2. Documentary film on Hip Hop by Henry Chalfant and Tony Silver. Proved to be an extremely inspirational element for the New School.

 

TAG (n) A writer's name and signature. (v) The execution of a signature.

 

TAGGING-UP The execution of a signature.

 

THROW-UP A quickly executed piece consisting of an outline with or without thin layer of spray paint for fill-in .

 

THROWIE Contemporary term for throw-up.

 

TOP-TO-BOTTOM

or (T to B) A piece which extends from the top of the subway car to the bottom

 

TOY 1. Inexperienced or incompetent writer

2. A small felt tip marker.

 

UP Describes a writer whose work appears regularly on the trains or through

out the city

 

WALL PAPER Repetition of a name written making enough coverage so that a pattern develops, much like wall paper.

 

WAK Substandard(Ç¥ÁØÀÌÇÏÀÇ) or incorrect.

 

WILD STYLE 1. Bronx crew from the 1970s led by Tracy 168.

2. A complicated construction of interlocking letters.

3. Classic film on Hip Hop culture directed by Charlie Ahearn.

 

WINDOW DOWN A piece done below the windows of a subway car.

 

WORK BUM New York City Transit Authority track maintenance worker.

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Posted by: rocko (trainbuff@aol.com) on Fri, Jun 8, 01 at 19:43

 

it is stated that although some graffiti is linked with gangs, the majority of it are from skateboarder and hip hop kids. some of it is kinda nice i saw a golden west boxcar with looney toon cartoon characters on it, my 5 year old kid loved it. some of these kids do have talent, i kinda actually like it now not on the engines though, i researched a little bit on this subject and now among the "graffiti community" they actually have rules to obey by

1. do not litter the tracks

2. do not paint the engines

3. leave the important reporting #s and weights alone.

love it or hate it graffiti is part of society, its unfortunate it jumped off the walls(although i did take an nj transit train from hazlet up to newark and it was just continuous from the minute i got on to the minute i got off)

but make it a positve if these kids continue to obey by the now set up rules then maybe some of these really rusted boxcars will be brightened up a little bit.

 

 

buffmonster.jpg

 

 

or this one..

 

RE: graffiti

Posted by: Alan Helfner (irishchieftain69@aol.com) on Mon, Jun 4, 01 at 0:31

 

Graffiti means only one thing to me - gangs. You know you've got serious trouble when graffiti starts showing up in your neighborhood; for example, there was an article in this Sunday's Star-Ledger about gang activity, and the related graffiti, increasing in Plainfield. Graffiti and trains are two things, IMO, that ought not to be connected, ever. Would you like someone coming along and graffiti-ing up your house while you were out? How would you react to that? Or your car (assuming you have one)? I'd go ballistic, personally. The last time I saw graffiti on any trains was on NYCTA; they looked like hell, until they came out with the silicone-based repellents in the new paint. NJT doesn't seem to have that problem. A lot of trucks seem to get hit with it nowadays, though. I'll leave it alone; if you like it, hey, go hang with the gang-bangers, just don't get shot.

 

 

 

and this one...

 

 

RE: graffiti

Posted by: Alan Helfner (irishchieftain69@aol.com) on Mon, Jun 11, 01 at 0:23

 

"Well...the idea of private property and ownership have been created by our society, not by an omnipotent God."

 

 

Let's see...Exodus 20:15, Thou shalt not steal; apparently spoken by the same God that said "Everything under heaven is mine" (sorry, no bible reference)...sounds like a very property-minded God. Sorry, but you weren't very clear about "our society", do you mean the one we live in now, or the one our forefathers set up a few milennia ago, or what? As far as I've observed, many wars have been fought over control of resources, going back milennia in history. Just as an example: If private property were meaningless, can I come over to your house and take your computer away from you, simply because I decided that I wanted another computer? Yes? No? Hey, I assumed that your computer isn't privately owned, so why should anyone stand in my way of just taking it for my own use? Can I use your car also? Never mind that...getting back to the thread, you wouldn't mind if I painted up your "crib" in graffiti that wasn't your own, right? Can I tattoo stuff on your body that you don't approve of? Can I take your clothes and dye them different colors behind your back, just because I felt a surge of artistic expression coming on? If the answer to any of those questions was "no", then maybe you should re-evaluate your own statements.

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**PULL IN - PULL OUT This is essentially a five to fifteen minute layup. At

the end of some subway routes trains park in a tunnel for several minutes before going back into service. During this time the trains are written on. Due to time constraints(°­Á¦, ¾ïÁ¦) pull in - pull outs were generally utilized for throw ups.

It was one of the more dangerous approaches to writing.**

 

yessssss:lick:

 

 

**you wouldn't mind if I painted up your "crib" in graffiti that wasn't your own, right? Can I tattoo stuff on your body that you don't approve of? Can I take your clothes and dye them different colors behind your back, just because I felt a surge of artistic expression coming on?**

 

 

That's why it takes a certain type of jerk to write...

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Guest --zeSto--

I hate 'graf slang'.

 

Honestly... just say steal or theive or boost or cop.. not rack! ok?

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Guest GoBiloe

is a backjump when you paint a train that's about to roll into the station?

 

someone tell me what a backjump is. i only hear europeans mention them.

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Guest clockworker

the extended subway art graffiti terms.....:rolleyes: ....great.....

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This shit is so annoying..haha but i was at work at 4 am..and i was sure no one else was at work..so i decided to spread the funk!haha..

 

heres to being a statistic!

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Originally posted by SIELOETTE

(¸<eth>ÀÌ´Ù, Áy´ÇÕÇÏ´Ù)(Ç¥Ày´, µµÀÛ)(Ç3ºÎÇÑ, ´ÙÀÛÀÇ)(2ôÀû°Å¸®´Ù, 3«1/4-ÇÏ´Ù)(Ã1/4Å©1«´Ì)(1/4Ò¿ëµ1ÀÌ)(È-1°¿-Â÷)(ÇÊÀû, 1/4-Ã1/4)(ºÎº<ETH>,¿î¸í(1/21/2Â1/2ÇÏ´Ù)(µ¿1/2ôëÀÇ, ´ç´ëÀÇ)(°í±ÍÇÑ, °í°¡Ã¶µµ)(¿¬1/4ӵǴÂ, ÀÏ°ü1/4ºÀÌ 3/4ø´Â)(ÇÕ´çÇÑ)(ÀûÀy´ÇÑ, 3/4î¿ï¸®´Â)(°ñÀÌÁø)(»õ·Î¸¸µç)(Ç¥ÁØÀÌÇÏÀÇ)

:lol:

 

But yea, those words are fine, they're the ones from spray can art right?

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Thanks man, now I'm REALLY feeling down and shit..WORD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:nut:

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A toy is a small marker? That's hot.

 

I'll invent a toy to do a handstyle on the head buff in a ding dong.

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Originally posted by GnomeToys

To be hip you must Dance'N'Graff

Hahahahahaha omg thats great. keep it goin man.. :D

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Originally posted by ink Lunatic

**PULL IN - PULL OUT This is essentially a five to fifteen minute layup. At

the end of some subway routes trains park in a tunnel for several minutes before going back into service. During this time the trains are written on. Due to time constraints(°_Á¦, ¾ïÁ¦) pull in - pull outs were generally utilized for throw ups.

It was one of the more dangerous approaches to writing.**

 

this is basically a back jump si?

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Guest imported_b0b

a backjump is painted when a train is in service (but obviously when it is stationary). a "pull-in/pull-out" sound sthe same as one, usually they are painted round the back of the train (ie the side away from the platform) and are one of the most stressful ways of painting.

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