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What Book Are You Reading? Pt. 19


Weapon X
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there was a book i read a while ago called 'topping from below'...it was "interesting". if i remember, the ending could have been better.

 

fatbastard read 'a million little pieces' by james frey at my suggestion. i would suggest it to anyone else looking for a good read(and maybe a little more).

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  • 2 years later...

Greed - the story of Mr Asia

 

Terry Clark (1944-1983), known as "Mr Asia", was the ruthless head of a New Zealand drug syndicate which imported heroin into New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom in the 1970s, and was responsible for a string of deaths.

 

He was imprisoned for the murder of his associate Marty Johnstone, whose battered and handless body was found in "Eccleston Delph", a flooded quarry in the north of England. He died in prison in 1983, officially of natural causes, but speculation arose that he was secretly murdered.

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Super interesting if you like numbers. Dude comes up with some great stuff:

 

 

 

 

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A spin off of this book is this one

 

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Honest and entertaining, Columbia University professor Venkatesh vividly recounts his seven years following and befriending a Chicago crack-dealing gang in a fascinating look into the complex world of the Windy City's urban poor. As introduced in Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner's bestseller, Freakonomics, Venkatesh became involved with the Black Kings—and their charismatic leader J.T.—as a first-year doctoral student at the University of Chicago. Sent to the projects with a multiple-choice test on poverty as his calling card, Venkatesh was, to his surprise, invited in to see how the drug dealers functioned in real life, from their corporate structure to the corporal punishment meted out to traitors and snitches. Venkatesh's narrative breaks down common misperceptions (such as all gang members are uneducated and cash rich, when the opposite is often true), the native of India also addresses his shame and subsequent emotional conflicts over collecting research on illegal activities and serving as the Black Kings' primary decision-maker for a day—hardly the actions of a detached sociological observer. But overinvolved or not, this graduate student turned gang-running rogue sociologist has an intimate and compelling tale to tell.

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