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TheoHuxtable

IRAQ IS A DISASTER

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THEO HUXTABLE

 

Where did you find that on-site report from Marine 1st Sgt Bill Skiles in Fallujah? Second Battalion, First Marines was my old unit. I wasn't in Echo Co., though, I was in Headquarters and Service Company for most of my tour. H&S 2/1 was the Marine company that contained the Admin (S-1) section, Intelligence (S-2), Training (S-3) and Logistics (S-4). I worked in the Battalion Armory, so technically we were S-4, but we spent most of our time in the field out with the line companies (Echo, Fox and Golf.) Marine battalions also have what is called a "ghost" company--the weapons and equipment are in storage, and there are no troops, but in a national emergency (like a declaration of war) they would draw some experienced officers, NCO's, and non-rates from the other companies, and then fill up the ranks with new recruits. In 2/1 the ghost company was "Hotel Co." I'd be very interested in reading any more stuff from him. Are you in direct contact with him, or indirect, through someone else?

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Re: THEO HUXTABLE

 

Originally posted by KaBar2

Where did you find that on-site report from Marine 1st Sgt Bill Skiles in Fallujah? Second Battalion, First Marines was my old unit. I wasn't in Echo Co., though, I was in Headquarters and Service Company for most of my tour. H&S 2/1 was the Marine company that contained the Admin (S-1) section, Intelligence (S-2), Training (S-3) and Logistics (S-4). I worked in the Battalion Armory, so technically we were S-4, but we spent most of our time in the field out with the line companies (Echo, Fox and Golf.) Marine battalions also have what is called a "ghost" company--the weapons and equipment are in storage, and there are no troops, but in a national emergency (like a declaration of war) they would draw some experienced officers, NCO's, and non-rates from the other companies, and then fill up the ranks with new recruits. In 2/1 the ghost company was "Hotel Co." I'd be very interested in reading any more stuff from him. Are you in direct contact with him, or indirect, through someone else?

 

Nah I got it through someone else. It's out there on the internet so just search it by typing a phrase from that sit rep and you may dig up some more info...

 

That's cool though that that's your same unit. Were you in Vietnam?

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This is kind of wierd

 

This is the second reply that I made to posts that disappeared. I replied to this post a couple of days ago. What happened? Did 12 oz. have a crash or something?

 

Anyway. No, no Vietnam for me. I was a anti-war protester back then. I joined the Marines after Vietnam, because I realized I was not a pacifist deep in my heart. I became a conscientious objector when I was 18 years old (1968.) I was very young, really. I thought I knew what was right, but as I got older, I realized I had made a mistake. And how do you make up for a mistake like that? I dropped out of art school and enlisted in the Marines in 1976, and requested "infantry." Jimmy Carter was President. I went to Boot Camp at MCRD San Diego, then was shipped to the U.S. Army Chemical & Ordnance School at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD., where I was assigned to a infantry small arms repairman's school (known colloquially as "armorer's school.") After that, I went to a Marine Reserve unit for a year, then "augumented" to the 1st Marine Division at MCB Camp Pendleton in 1977, and served in the Second Battalion, First Marine Regiment, known as "2/1," or "Second Battalion, First Marines." We trained a lot in the desert at 29 Palms, CA (it's called the "National Training Center" now, I believe) with live fire exercises--tanks, artillery, mortars, helicopters and fixed wing aircraft.

We went overseas on a "float" to Okinawa, where our battalion served with the Third Marine Division. We were "primary air contingency battalion" in the western Pacific when Ronald Reagan took office (Jan 1980.) We did a "WestPac float" to the Phillipines, Mindinao, South Korea and then back to the NTA (the Northern Training Area) on Okinawa. I got out in July 1980. I often think I should have made the Marine Corps a career. If I had, I could have retired from the Marines in 1997 with half pay, full medical benefits for life, and lifetime commissary benefits. But I chose to get out.

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no shit....Bush is a motherfuckin idiot...hail to the theif...if reelected we are doomed to get fuck 4 more years then the rest of the world will join the other half who already hates us....bomb walls not iraq....use the war machine money to help any of the countless masses inside of america who need it...buck fush:mad:

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Re: This is kind of wierd

 

Originally posted by KaBar2

This is the second reply that I made to posts that disappeared. I replied to this post a couple of days ago. What happened? Did 12 oz. have a crash or something?

 

Anyway. No, no Vietnam for me. I was a anti-war protester back then. I joined the Marines after Vietnam, because I realized I was not a pacifist deep in my heart. I became a conscientious objector when I was 18 years old (1968.) I was very young, really. I thought I knew what was right, but as I got older, I realized I had made a mistake. And how do you make up for a mistake like that? I dropped out of art school and enlisted in the Marines in 1976, and requested "infantry." Jimmy Carter was President. I went to Boot Camp at MCRD San Diego, then was shipped to the U.S. Army Chemical & Ordnance School at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD., where I was assigned to a infantry small arms repairman's school (known colloquially as "armorer's school.") After that, I went to a Marine Reserve unit for a year, then "augumented" to the 1st Marine Division at MCB Camp Pendleton in 1977, and served in the Second Battalion, First Marine Regiment, known as "2/1," or "Second Battalion, First Marines." We trained a lot in the desert at 29 Palms, CA (it's called the "National Training Center" now, I believe) with live fire exercises--tanks, artillery, mortars, helicopters and fixed wing aircraft.

We went overseas on a "float" to Okinawa, where our battalion served with the Third Marine Division. We were "primary air contingency battalion" in the western Pacific when Ronald Reagan took office (Jan 1980.) We did a "WestPac float" to the Phillipines, Mindinao, South Korea and then back to the NTA (the Northern Training Area) on Okinawa. I got out in July 1980. I often think I should have made the Marine Corps a career. If I had, I could have retired from the Marines in 1997 with half pay, full medical benefits for life, and lifetime commissary benefits. But I chose to get out.

 

Wow KaBar. Is the Aberdeen Proving Grounds near a town called Indian Head in Maryland? If so, that's probably the same school my dad went to during the Vietnam era. He was a mortarman -- I assume that's where mortarmen go. I spent a couple weeks in San Diego, but over at 32nd Street on the Navy side.

 

Also, for the WestPac float, what ship did were you embarked on? Then again, it's been so many years that many of those ships swapped duty stations with other ships, so chances are it ain't in the WestPac region anymore. I made several visits to Okinawa too. White Beach and Kadena Air Force base to name a couple. I was stationed in Yokosuka, Japan and took part in plenty of WestPac operations. Also where in South Korea did y'all go. I'm assuming Chinnhae, where the South Korean naval base and a small U.S. base is.

 

They may have "officially" changed the name to Northern Training Area, but I still hear everyone refer to it as 29 Palms.

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Theo Huxtable

 

It's been like twenty-four years ago, but I think the LPH we were on was named something like the U.S.S. "Tarawa" or the "Guadacanal"--it was a famous WWII Marine Corps battle. When we were in the Med, in '76, in the Reserves, were were on the U.S.S. Raliegh.

 

29 Palms is the old name of the National Training Center. It used to be called MCB 29 Palms, and was right outside the town of 29 Palms, California. Marines call it "29 Stumps", or sometimes just "The Stumps." It's the bleakest fucking desert terrain you ever saw in your life.

 

The Northern Training Area is on the island of Okinawa itself. By now it may have been closed, but back in the day, it was the premier training area on the Rock.

 

I don't remember the name of the area we went to in Korea. It was out in the boondocks--no town, no liberty, and no women, anywhere. All we did was train and watch the ROK Marines blow the everlovin' shit out of everything in sight. Those guys are genuine no-shit bad asses. They train a lot harder than the U.S. Marines, and discipline within the ranks is fucking brutal, or at least, it was back then. I saw ROK Marine sergeants beat the crap out of their men for pretty minor shortcomings. They would get punishment tours of guard duty at night, and the sergeant would show up with a bucket of water and "whoosh." "See if THAT doesn't improve your behavior, shitbird!" The ROK Marines are fucking hard core.

 

We were stationed at Subic Bay in the Phillipines. Olongapo was the biggest whorehouse of a town I have ever seen. There have been so many generations of hookers grown up there that the hookers often look very much like American girls--some African-American-Filipino, some Caucasian-American-Filipino, from all the hooker babies fathered by American G.I.'s. Some of my buddies had bar girl "girlfriends" (for the duration of our stay) as young as thirteen or fourteen.

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man..shit is so bad its astonishing.

i can't fucking believe bush's happy face rhetoric..

dude needs to get socked.

 

undeniable.

 

kabar, i'm curious what your stance on iraq is now?

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POIESIS

 

I think the Bush Administration make a grave error when they invaded Iraq with such a small force. We should have hit them with overwhelming, vast numbers of troops, and secured the borders to prevent any cross-border movement of guerrillas, munitions and weapons. I guess hindsight is 20-20, but I thought that back then too. The administration was trying to wage war the cheap way.

 

We cannot just pull out and say. "Well, if you don't want democracy, then fuck ya." Millions of Iraqis do want a democratic nation, but Saddam has done an excellent job of driving out or killing every Iraqi person who would normally serve as the grass-roots leaders. There ARE no labor unionists, no independent, tenured college professors, no loyal opposition political parties, no moderate or liberal business leaders, no independent judiciary. It's like a nation built around strict nepotism, tribalism, mafia-like loyalties and corruption. Everybody is on the take. Everybody owes loyalty to their tribe, and the tribal and religious leaders see society as a zero-sum game: "If I don't dominate, then I will be dominated." Nobody is willing to compromise or back down unless he is facing imminent destruction.

 

The efforts of the Iraqi government to prepare for elections is being disrupted and sabotaged by the Islamist extremists. It would be the equivalent of having the Christian right wing attack polling places here in the U.S., killing precinct judges and shooting election workers. They do not believe that it is acceptable for people to vote in secular politicians. The Islamists want NOBODY but their people elected, and certainly not any moderates.

 

But look at Indonesia. It's election went fine, mainly due to the fact that the Indonesian nation is much more developed and well-educated than the Iraqi nation, and Indonesia does not want to ever undergo another upheaval like it did under the dictator, Sukarno.

 

I think we must stay until the Iraqi government is on it's feet, and there will probably be a substantial American military presence there for quite a few years. Hopefully, this will be accompanied by a vast infusion of American capital investment, rebuilding of schools, hospitals, roads, military hardware and so forth. I hope someday Iraq will be an American ally on the same plane as Turkey.

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This shit has gotten quite heavy to say the least. I participated in many of these boards last spring but spent the majority of the summer traveling in europe and eastern Africa. Now I find myself back at school w/in the scholarly bubble so to say, and the tone is the same. I was not really expecting things to be different, but it is quite a shock to see how much has happened in the world, how much these evnts have had on my life and the way I think, and how little it has affected the two cities I call home (STL and NO). Besides twenty or so pictures on the wall at the airport, and the daily news reports, the pulse of things seems ill effected. I don't like to draw very conclusive opinions on matters of politics, but there is an understanding of an apathetic construct that effectivly dulls the reality of world events. From Iraq to the 9th ward I learn of things every day that wrench at my gut and bring everything to bear at once. I watched a man get his head slowly sawed off by a group of men in Iraq, and then turn on the tv and see a cut of this clip before sports and the weather. When Pearl (?) was executed in pakistan it warented an Paki/Amer co-op that brought a number of men to court. These latest actions have just become part of the daily meele. This is looking at our perception of IRAQ as a reality, This i think is the root of why I just thought this stuff up, If I use the daily sources papers, tv, internet.. to educate myself on Iraq I see a perpetual conflict in the midst of an area that as your average joe know very little of. The point is that I can't understand what is going on I might revert to the elected leaders and their beurocrats for answers and they tell me that Iraq was posing an iminent threat to american interests in the world. This is why we invaded their country and established military order. This is why we are trying to consruct a new government that will somehow bridge the poliical cultures of the east and west. This is why american soldiers are being cut down every day. Freedome and liberty form the cornerstone of our civilization, but does that mean that an evolved form of this system (evolved in the sense that it incorperates our structure to their reality) will emrge from a reality that is percieved as near complete chaos. I am fighting with myself over critical opinion and have been trying to type this as an observer, an attempt to understand someone who does not know alot about this place and gathers his/her opinion from daily media sources. Is it just that people see thses clips and gather that that is all that matters. It does not have a direct effect on their day to day lives, but is it realy a suprise when a family down the streete has one of it's children killed, and should it be expected that violent acts will harm the civilian polulation of the US. This instills fear, but how is this fear directed and marginalized into daily affairs? and what does daily affairs entail, Going to work and producing something, An average Iraqi's daily affair might consist of a war breaking out on his way to work, their daily events are being attempted in an arena of violent conflict. Are they even going to be considering the possibilities for leadership. Isn't that a major thing behind all of this, to give Iraqi's the ability to choose. and if so is the reality that most Iraqi's are forced to make life and death choices. And is the choice of who may eventually lead evn seen as a hopeful thought or is the fear that they might become a civilian casualty enough to make them pick up arms and defend themselves against an invading force who wishes to impose laws that reflect a radical evolution in local ways of life. And what s the eventual reality- can Iran as an islamic state, Iraq as a rep democracy, and saudi arabia whose princes have a monoploly on political power relly co-exist. Not to exclude turkey, it is home to everyone from kurds to europeans and lay claim to one of the most impressive empires in history. Is iraq's survival connected indefinantly to ionternations security support, and if this is true then doesnt this secure american involvement for years to come, and prove critics of so called american imperialism. This doesn't even incorperate the actions of arab compacts or the UN, the one organization that may be able to secure elctions, but may have to sacrifice itself in the precess. one thing all this rambling is missing is accountability and that is what will begin to define the historical contexts of the present conflict.

OR, the way our kids will learn about it.

-As noted I had not visited these boards in a while, I need to collect my thoughts, paiint, think and come back with some sound opinions. Man this hsit is overwhelming. Peace Love Conflict.

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Without reading 7 pages of this, does anyone know what's going on with the other countries fighting in Iraq? Specifically on the British side. Are they experiencing the same casualties as America? And why the fuck do I never hear anything about them?

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im hoping to get an answer from kabar2 and others reasonable peoples in here but here's the question

what the us should do if the iraqis ppl vote for one of the islamic extremists to be the next president of iraq?

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Originally posted by justaname

im hoping to get an answer from kabar2 and others reasonable peoples in here but here's the question

what the us should do if the iraqis ppl vote for one of the islamic extremists to be the next president of iraq?

 

 

I don't think the interim Iraqi government will allow an "extremist" candidate to run for office.

 

But if that were to happen, it would look bad of the US and the Iraq. It would look bad for the US to sit idle and do nothing about it, but it would also look bad if the US were to have to go in and cause a "regime change" all over again.

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I'm not sure

 

I suppose it is possible. It would roughly be the same situation as if the American people elected Jerry Falwell to be President of the U.S. If he is legitimately elected in free and fair elections, I don't see how the U.S. could do anything but accept it. One would hope that if a Muslim extremist were elected he would have the good sense to work on building Iraq into a modern, prosperous state, but that has not really been the model put forth by other Islamic republics.

 

However, down the road twenty or thirty years, we might see change brought about by the repressive atmosphere usually created by religiously motivated government functionaries. In Iran, for instance, young Muslims make fun of the imams anf the self-appointed Morality Police, right to their faces. The days of whipping immodest people in the streeet are gone. Young Iranians know they are being left behind by the world, and they resent it. I think that eventually, something similar will occur in Iraq. Most of the people in Iraq are normal, rational people. They just want to have a better life. On the Iraq-Iraqis blog, the writer makes it clear that hundreds of thousands of new cars clog the streets, blackouts are at least partially created by the big influx of new electricity-consuming appliances like refrigerators, washing machines and air conditioners. He states "anybody with any ability who wants a job can find one anywhere." Maybe an exaggeration, but it points up a certain positive attitude about the future.

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Elections, yeah right. We are perpetuating an arena in which political progression has always come in the form of open violence or forcefull subordination. Without drastic changes elections will be impossible, or at least not by january.

 

check it out www.icg.org some of the best.

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Originally posted by ZedIsAlive@Oct 11 2004, 01:41 AM

any opinions on fahrenheit 9/11, or did i miss it.

iraq and afgn are complete disaters. taliban and insurgants are flooding across the borders like a blue light special in kmart. i have family in the military, srgnt in the marines things are a complete mess. we will not have the military presents to contain the resistance. bush is lieing there will be a DRAFT if we stay in these countriesssss!!!!!!!!!!! :burn: :evil2:

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Originally posted by ZedIsAlive@Oct 11 2004, 01:41 AM

any opinions on fahrenheit 9/11, or did i miss it.

 

 

"FOX NEWS" for lazy liberals. the leftist equivalent to O'Reilly.

 

you cant conflate all the dynamics of this conflict into a 2 hour mtv attention span film. the way to stay abreast of everything is to READ. read both the left and the right literature...the truth is usually somewhere in the middle. lots of mainstream journalism is more even-keeled, particulary NYTIMES columnists like Friedman and Dowd. Watching *just* FOX news or *just* M Dot Moore's Ego-mentary will leave you with no real intelligent position, and no real perspective on whats going on.

 

Also, as per all these comments, i just notice a recurring theme of oversimplification...you cant sum up this situation in a few buzz words or placard slogans. there are real reasons why it was important to go into the middle east, regardless of botched this administration did it....analogies to Roman Imperialism is just exaggerated and uninformed.

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