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-Rage-

Goliath...The Bird Eating SPIDER

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Goliath Birdeater Tarantula Theraphose blondi

 

Tarantulas are generally large, hairy nocturnal spiders. They vary in color from brown with pinkish markings to jet black. Tarantulas are found in tropical and subtropical areas of the world such as Africa, North and South America, Australia, and the Indo-Pacific region. The name tarantula is derived from the city of Taranto, Italy and a dance performed there. History tells us that the Tarantella dance was performed to cure the effects of a tarantula's bite. Some believe the story to be just an excuse to dance around wildly! The first spider to be called a tarantula was actually a wolf spider. Wolf spiders are not closely related to the theraphosid spiders we know as tarantulas.

 

 

Some tarantulas grow as large as dinner plates. Tarantulas do not spin webs typical of many spiders, instead, they live in burrows. They are ambush predators who lie in wait for prey to come within their reach. They hunt using sensory organs on their legs to detect the vibrations of moving prey. Tarantulas inject their venom using fangs located on their chelicerea. Their venom pre-digests their prey allowing them to drink their meal with their mouth parts. Tarantula venom is not lethal to humans, but allergic reactions may cause life-threatening problems. Tarantulas utilize their venom as a secondary line of defense against predators. Many species possess urtricating hairs that work like porcupine quills to be thrown at predators. The term urtricating means irritating or inflaming.

 

 

Like other spiders, a cuticle or exoskeleton covers tarantulas. The fine hairs all over the body are called setae. Tarantulas are mygalomorph spiders whose fangs are used to strike downward and pull the prey against the body. Tarantulas extend their legs using blood pressure rather than muscles. Water loss creates problems for the tarantula because it lowers its blood pressure which makes walking difficult.

 

 

Although the tarantula may present a dangerous presence, it has several predators. Predators include the coatimundi, a raccoon relative and, most dangerous to the tarantula, the tarantula hawk wasps. A female wasp paralyzes the tarantula with a sting and then stuffs it into its burrow, where she lays her eggs on its body. The wasp eggs hatch and feed on the still living but paralyzed tarantula.

 

 

 

SPECIES INFO

Golitath Birdeater Tarantula

Common Name: Goliath Birdeater Tarantula, Baboon Spider, Monkey Spider and Mygale

Scientific Name: Theraphose blondi

Size: 12 inches (30.48 cm)

Range: Northeastern South America

Habitat: Upland rain forest

Diet: Small mammals, lizards and birds

Aquarium Diet: Rats and Mice

 

http://www.saddleworth.net/gedspage/images/Ged-spider02.jpg'>

"It's not as big as my penis!"

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the hump meister gives a thumbs down to bugs/insects...or maybe it's because i'm scared of them.

 

man "bling bling" would look nasty if it was to get smashed. lots o' guts

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Guest imported_El Mamerro

It's still no Camel Spider though. Beer,

 

El Mamerro

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Guest SayOne

man if i saw that i would probably scream like a little bitch

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Originally posted by SayOne

man if i saw that i would probably scream like a little bitch

 

me too. I'd get a size 16 shoes and beat the fuck out of it too.

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that first picture took a few seconds to load....so as i was reading it popped up and i got scared...damn spiders

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