Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
kaesthebluntedwonder

dont sleep...

Recommended Posts

dont sleep on gerhard richter paintings, they are uncomfortable. use a bed instead.

 

i peeped this for a little bit today and i thought id share it with those who might be interested..highly recommended if you can get to it in time..so amazing at times i thought i could step into the paintings..

 

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART PRESENTS FIRST NEW YORK RETROSPECTIVE

OF PAINTINGS BY GERHARD RICHTER

 

 

Exhibition's Focus on Paintings Reveals the Multifaceted Nature of Richter's Work and

 

His Mastery of Multiple Genres over the Course of His Career

 

 

 

Gerhard Richter: Forty Years of Painting

 

February 14–May 21, 2002

 

 

 

 

NEW YORK, February 2002—Gerhard Richter: Forty Years of Painting is the first full-scale survey of the paintings of the influential German artist ever mounted in New York as well as the most comprehensive overview of the artist’s work yet seen in North America. The exhibition, among the largest MoMA has ever devoted to a contemporary artist, presents 188 canvases from every phase of Richter’s career, from 1962 to today. This exhibition demonstrates the artist's mastery of diverse genres, including gestural abstractions, landscapes, portraits, and other photo-based pictures, as well as the vitality of painting as a mode of expression. Richter’s diverse body of work calls into question many widely held attitudes about the inherent importance of stylistic consistency, the “organic” evolution of individual artistic sensibility, the spontaneous nature of creativity, and the relationship of technological means and mass media imagery to traditional studio methods and formats. While many contemporary postmodernists have explored these issues by circumventing or dismissing painting as a viable artistic option, Richter has challenged painting to meet the demands posed by new forms of conceptual art. Gerhard Richter: Forty Years of Painting is organized by Robert Storr, Senior Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art.

 

Richter has long been a greatly respected figure in Europe, but, Storr states, “the fact remains that compared to American contemporaries of similar achievement—Jasper Johns and Robert Ryman, to name two—Richter is relatively unfamiliar to the general American public and still insufficiently known or understood by the dedicated audience of modern art.” Two exhibitions of Richter's work have been shown in the United States: a twenty-two-painting overview at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1987 and an eighty-painting

 

 

 

survey that opened at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto in 1988 and then traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Over the years, Richter’s renown in America has grown, with his work featured in galleries, group or thematic shows at museums, and exhibitions devoted to a particular aspect of his work.

 

Richter has been enormously prolific and has worked in all mediums. Painting, however, has always been his primary concern, and with the exception of one early drawing and his sculptural portraits of himself and Blinky Palermo, Gerhard Richter: Forty Years of Painting is exclusively focused on paintings. Storr states: “Fifty years after Richter found his vocation and forty years after making his first distinctive mark, the accumulated evidence selectively presented in this exhibition vindicates his faith in an art form fewer and fewer of his closest supporters have believed in and much of the general public has taken for granted, at high cost to painting's ability to convey fresh meaning. In any event, it is a medium that has come to depend for its survival on Richter's severe scrutiny—and it has survived and thrived in large measure because of it.”

 

 

and just to give you an idea of what some of its like (this guy paints everything)

 

 

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/modern/pictures/E33625big.jpg'>

http://www.af-moma.no/english/kunstnere/richter_large_1.jpg'>

http://www.af-moma.no/english/kunstnere/richter_large_2.jpg'>

http://www.guggenheimcollection.org/images/lists/work/136_2_lg.jpg'>

http://www.guggenheimcollection.org/images/lists/work/136_1_lg.jpg'>

http://www.ncartmuseum.org/graphics/pics/collections/20th/1950-2000/richter_lrg.jpg'>

http://www.ago.net/info/collection/images_collection/large/844.jpg'>

http://www.staatsgalerie.de/media/sammlungen/gem/n45_richter_l.jpg'>

this oughta suffice...im telling you, if you can, go see this

:idea:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This shouldn't be on page 2...

 

 

I don't really like the pieces with spattered paint and fat brush strokes, but love everything else..

 

 

thank you Kaes !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might change my mind.

 

I guess i meant they dont apeal to me as much when i compare them to everything else he does...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest THE LAW

ahhhhhhh.....Gerhard Richter rules!!!!

 

been fortunate enough to see most of those pictured in person...

 

 

that first one is mesmerizing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest imported_Tesseract

I wanted to start a thread about this... Kaes your title is misleading.

Gerhart Richter is my favorite painter, legentary skills, bonebreaking context. Although i've seen lots of his stuff and have a couple of books on him i'd give my right ball to see that exhibition....to bad i wont.

Somebody send me the catalogue!!!!:o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my bad

 

yes i know it is a little misleading. i tried to change it as you can see, but it doesnt change that title on the thread listing page. sorry about that, i just figured people would click on this anyway and see what its about. oh well, now i know for next time..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest imported_Tesseract

No cipher, those are oil paintings...when we say legentary skills we mean that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by Tesseract

No cipher, those are oil paintings...when we say legentary skills we mean that

 

no, they're photographs. i mean...just...say they're photgraphs. please.

 

I'm in duh-nei-uhl

 

 

kaes, they're just so rediculously insanely good that I refuse to believe they are oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest imported_Tesseract

Cipher....NO

its oil hitting you like a sledgehammer:D

Wait till you see some landscapes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you shoulda seen me at the museum..i started talking to the girl in the red and white blouse painting..i was telling her to turn around because i noticed in the other paintings how pretty she was, standing there holding whatever she was reading...

 

seriously, these things speak to you...they have such strong personalities its kind of eerie sometimes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest HAL

Holy fuck. Versatility should be more important in the art world.

 

Looking at the candle painting, it could be used as an example of the perfect painting. Technically, it's overwhelming, color, composition, artistic skill.... It also has a strong emotional content to it, which I think a lot of realism lacks, and the imagery conveys a message. To me it reminds me that life is short and you have to live it to the fullest. What a great collection of work. I really have to see this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register for a 12ozProphet forum account or sign in to comment

You need to be a forum member in order to comment. Forum accounts are separate from shop accounts.

Create an account

Register to become a 12ozProphet forum member.

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×