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CARL 2DVS

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  1. No doubt on that attleboro move..Ryno will let u know how I get down for my peoples... Yeah elliot did it.. that marcy crib was effective......OAK OAK OAK.....
  2. BBDDDDDAAAAAT....WHERE DA FIDUCK IS THE BX AT?
  3. Part 2....shouts to PART5 The second occurred in 1968 with the completion of a 15,382 unit co-op apartment complex on the northern edge of the Bronx near an expressway. This third event involved a group of seven teenage boys who began terrorizing the vicinity around the Bronxdale Project on Bruckner Boulevard in the southeast Bronx. This may not seem important, but this group of teenagers laid the groundwork for a surge of street gang activity that would overwhelm the Bronx for the next six years. This group at first called itself the Savage Seven, but as more members joined, the group changed its name to the Black Spades. Overnight street gangs appeared on every corner of the Bronx. It should be noted that Afrika Bambaataa who had a tremendous effect on rap music and the ‘Hip Hop’ culture and who will be discussed at length in another section of my unit, was a member and leader of the Black Spades at one time. I bring this point up to illustrate that many rappers in the ‘Hip Hop’ subculture were gang members at some time in their life At first graffiti writing was limited to just artists writing their tag names. Some examples of some famous tag names in NYC other than TAKI 183 were SLY II, LEE 163d, PHASE 2, and TRACY 168. There was a large group of graffiti writers who attended DeWitt Clinton High School which was located across the street from a Transit Authority storage yard. The subway system was a main target of the early graffiti writers. A common meeting place was a coffee shop near DeWitt on W. Mosholu Parkway.
  4. Makes you think about the people in your life. Then I think about Sedi; what'd he say if he was here he'd say, "Cee, what's it about? What's life about? If you don't go through as a man's a man" he'd say, "Suck it up, take the fall, do the time that's what makes you who you are, makes you what you are" How many years you been around this thing of ours? RFC, 125 years What's it about? It's about rules, parameters. You take the beaten for the friend you don't lay down you don't betray who you are, what you are.. You gotta remember guys like CA, BUSTA, RaST, BUDA They don't roar, they don't rat. You know why? That's the rules, you don't break them. You was born to be somethin I wasn't even supposed to be.. humble Okaay so you humble me now, what you got? You got a war, you got global war You got a CITYWIDE crime syndicate now There's no rules, there's no parameters, there's no feelings There's no feelings for this game So.. five ten years from now You gonna wish there was RFC Five ten years from now... They're gonna miss GRAFF.... THAT 5, 10 YEARS IS NOW... SEDI RIP... WE STILL LOVE YOU DOGS..
  5. Skool em Carl.......... According to my research all sources seem to point to the Bronx in New York City as the origin for the ‘Hip Hop’ culture. The first major component of this subculture I wish to explore is the graffiti aspect. Prior to discussing this aspect students need to know what conditions or events existed in the Bronx which fostered the development of the ‘Hip Hop’ culture. Steven Haver in his book, “Hip Hop; the Illustrated History of Break Dancing, Rap Music and Graffiti,” states that there were three major events which took place in the Bronx which led to the birth of this subculture. First, in 1959 Parks Commissioner Rober Moses began building an expressway through the heart of the Bronx. As a result, the middle class Italian, German, Irish, and Jewish neighborhoods disappeared overnight. In addition, businesses and factories relocated and left this borough. These exiting middle classes and businesses were replaced by poor black and Hispanic families.
  6. Welcome to The Bronx, one of New York City's "must see" communities. It's a place of world-famous attractions, diverse artistic expression, miles of parks, and over 60 landmarks and historic districts. It's where people like Edgar Allan Poe and Mark Twain lived -- and break dancing and salsa music were born. Our dramatic revitalization has earned us the prestigious All-America City Award and the Crown Community Award. So there's never been a better time to visit us and see why they say, "The Bronx Is Up!" We believe that life, creation, everything is based on mathematics. RSC
  7. Yo I went and hung with that nikka Kone over the summer and let me just say he got some BIG things going on....... YE.. I see you finally figured this shit out..... I xpect to see those flicks... call me if you need a hand.........
  8. Yo I could use those.... Ryno is a horrible fotographer.. And I gotta hide too many faces so yeah..... Send them to Carlnyny@yahoo.com+++ Ye.. I see u nikka!!!!!!!!!! Show some love
  9. 1971 HIP HOP MUSIC "ARETHA FRANKLIN" RECORDS THE FAMOUS BBOY SONG "ROCK STEADY" WITH "BERNARD PURDIE" ON DRUMS WRITING/GRAFF AROUND THIS TIME A YOUNG GREEK KID GOT INSPIRED BY SEEING "JULIO 205" TAG, THE HE DECIDED TO PUT HIS NICK NAME NEXT TO A 183 STREET SIGN AND THUS WAS BORN THE FAMOUS "TAKI 183" "TAKI 183" DOES AN INTERVIEW FOR THE NY TIMES WHICH SETS OFF A WRITING SPREE
  10. YE.. I see u nikka.....Sak booogie, Keep it TFO Told u I had some Xclusives.....shhhhhhhh streets is watching
  11. HA......I can hear it Already.. "No man, Thats Wade" "No Its not, its Core" "No it aint its Daze & Snoop dog" HAAAAAA
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