Welcome!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

  1. Welcome to the 12ozProphet Forum...
    You are currently logged out and viewing our forum as a guest which only allows limited access to our discussions, photos and other forum features. If you are a 12ozProphet Member please login to get the full experience.

    If you are not a 12ozProphet Member, please take a moment to register to gain full access to our website and all of its features. As a 12ozProphet Member you will be able to post comments, start discussions, communicate privately with other members and access members-only content. Registration is fast, simple and free, so join today and be a part of the largest and longest running Graffiti, Art, Style & Culture forum online.

    Please note, if you are a 12ozProphet Member and are locked out of your account, you can recover your account using the 'lost password' link in the login form. If you no longer have access to the email you registered with, please email us at [email protected] and we'll help you recover your account. Welcome to the 12ozProphet Forum (and don't forget to follow @12ozprophet in Instagram)!

tsunami conspiracy ?

Discussion in 'News' started by robJ, Jan 5, 2005.

  1. robJ

    robJ Member

    Joined: Oct 8, 2004 Messages: 385 Likes Received: 0
    I was watching MSNBC and the conspiracy are flying.. I counld't find the topic on there web site. Then again, it might of been late breaking,But it went on to saying the this might of happen by India testing nuclear bombs in the ocean.. The only link this I could find at the moment which has nothing to do with india but russia...

    http://www.intl-news.com/blog/_archives/2005/1/2/221138.html
     
  2. !@#$%

    [email protected]#$% Moderator Crew

    Joined: Oct 1, 2002 Messages: 18,517 Likes Received: 621
    this is something a commentator in the muslim world thought up and ran with.
    it's from an op-ed piece and people in the middle east of course jumped all over it, because the u.s. was also accused of possibly playing a role.

    i think it's probably bullshit of course, considering the number of oceanographers from many different nations who predicted the earthquake, and of course some who predicted the ensuing tsunami.

    when huge tragedies happen, i think people want to sensationalize it, and some poeple just want someone to blame.

    it's hard for some to believe that mother nature has a wrath beyond any government superpower, any war, that she is more destructive than any God.

    unfortunately, there are going to be some people who believe this, even though there were plenty of patterns alerting the world to the possibility of a huge earthquake in that area.

    there have been huge earthquakes since the dawn of time, and they'll still happen when it's dusk.


    but ..some interesting reading for you..

    Q: What are some other disturbances that can cause tsunamis?

    A: Landslides or explosions such as underwater nuclear testing.

    Q: Is underwater nuclear testing common?

    A: Yes, The United States has conducted 1,054 tests of nuclear devices between July 16, 1945 and September 23, 1992. Before 1962, all the tests were atmospheric (on land or in the Pacific or Atlantic oceans) but overall the majority - 839 - were underground tests. From 1966 to 1990, 167 French nuclear test explosions have been performed on two atolls in French Polynesia, Morurua and Fangataua. Of the 167 tests, 44 were atmospheric. Atmospheric explosions were carried out until 1974, but only underground tests after that. The underground tests have been conducted at the bottom of shafts bored 500-1200 meters into the basalt core of the atoll. Initially these shafts were drilled in the outer rim of the atoll. In 1981, most likely due to the weakening of that rim, the tests with higher yields were shifted to shafts drilled under the lagoon itself.

    Q: What are the effects of underwater nuclear testing?

    A: To quote from a 1995 case brought against the French government, Case T-219/95 R, by Marie-Thérèse Danielsson, Pierre Largenteau and Edwin Haoa, all residing in Tahiti, French Polynesia: "Short-term effects include geological damage and the venting of gaseous and volatile fission products into the biosphere. Nuclear tests, the applicants say, can cause landslides and did indeed cause a major underwater landslide at Mururoa in 1979, when a nuclear device was exploded after jamming half-way down its shaft. Since the geology of Mururoa is already unstable due to large-scale fracturing caused by previous tests, further major landslides are likely. Such landslides in the past have given rise to tsunamis causing coastal damage in areas as far away as Pitcairn and Tahiti and endangering residences such as that of Ms. Danielsson. They can also release radioactive material into the sea, with catastrophic effects on the food chain in an area such as French Polynesia where fish is an important part of the diet.

    Q: What were the effects of the Murarao landslide?

    A: It shifted at least one million cubic meters of coral and rock and created a cavity, probably 140 meters in diameter and produced a major tidal wave comparable to a tsunami, which spread through the Tuamotu Archipelago and injured people on the southern part of Moruroa Atoll. French authorities initially denied that any mishap had occurred and declared that the tidal wave was of natural origin, but in a publication in 1985 they did acknowledge "the accident of 25 July 1979".

    Q: Can landslides create tsunamis?

    A: Research on underwater landslides is new and it is only in recent years that the potentially catastrophic results of a landslide have become known. Dr Summerhayes, Director of the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences in the United Kingdom, is quoted in the Independent Newspaper on 9 September 1995 as saying that volcanic islands like Mururoa were:

    "... inherently unstable and may fail given an appropriate trigger like an earthquake or a very large explosion. Failure is likely to cause a giant submarine landslide which may demolish parts of the island and could create a tidal wave that may itself damage coastal installations on other islands nearby."

    Furthermore he stated that the creation of such a tidal wave was "a general threat to coasts as far away as New Zealand and Australia."

    Q: How predictable would earthquakes be in the region around Indonesia?

    A: Indonesia, an archipelago of 17,000 islands, lies along the Pacific Ring of Fire where plate boundaries intersect and volcanoes regularly erupt.

    Q: How common are tsunamis in the Indian Ocean?

    A: Tsunamis are rare in the Indian Ocean though there have been 7 records of tsunamis set off by earthquakes near Indonesia, Pakistan and at the Bay of Bengal.

    This is the first multi-ocean tsunami since Krakatau erupted in the nineteenth century.

    Q: Is there a warning system for tsunamis in place?

    A: An international system of buoys and monitoring stations " the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center based in Hawaii " spans the Pacific, alerting nations there to any oncoming disasters. But no such system guards the Indian Ocean. Neither India or Sri Lanka are part of the system and though Thailand is the south western coast does not have the system,s sensors floated on buoys.

    Q: Could the carnage have been avoided?

    A: Much of this death and destruction could have been prevented with a simple system of buoys. Officials in Thailand and Indonesia have said that an immediate public warning could have saved lives, but that they did not know about the danger because there was no international system in place to track tsunamis in the Indian Ocean.

    Q: How difficult would it have been to set up?

    A: The detector buoys have been around for decades and the U.S. has had a monitoring system for more than half a century. More than 50 seismometers dot the Northwest ready to monitor earthquakes that might cause tsunamis. There are 6 buoys in the middle of the Pacific equipped with sensors called "tsunameters" that measure changes in water pressure and programmed to alert the country's two tsunami-warning centers in Hawaii and Alaska. Dr. Eddie Bernard, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, says just a few buoys could do the job.

    Q: What held up putting a system in place?

    A: Scientists wanted to place two more tsunami meters in the Indian Ocean, including one near Indonesia, but lacked funding, said Bernard. The tsunameters each cost only $250,000.

    Q: How soon did people know about the tsunami?

    A: Within 15 minutes of the earthquake, scientists running the existing tsunami warning system for the Pacific sent an alert from their Honolulu hub to 26 participating countries, including Thailand and Indonesia, that destructive waves might be generated by the Sumatra tremors.

    Q: Did anyone warn Indonesia or any other country?

    A: "We put out a bulletin within 20 minutes, technically as fast as we could do it," says Jeff LaDouce of the NOOA. LaDouce says e-mails were dispatched to Indonesian officials, but he doesn't know what happened to the information. Phone calls were hurriedly made to countries in the Indian Ocean danger zone, Dr. Laura S. L. Kong, a Commerce Department seismologist and director of the International Tsunami Information Center said, but not with the speed that comes from pre-established emergency planning. Reportedly, NOOA didn,t know whom to contact.

    Q: What responsibility do Asian governments have in the lack of preparedness?

    A: At a meeting in June of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, a United Nations body, experts concluded that the "Indian Ocean has a significant threat from both local and distant tsunamis" and should have a warning network but India, Thailand, Malaysia and other countries in the region have "never shown the initiative to do anything," said Dr. Tad Murty, an expert on the region's tsunamis who is affiliated with the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. "There's no reason for a single individual to get killed in a tsunami," he noted, "The waves are totally predictable. We have travel-time charts covering all of the Indian Ocean. From where this earthquake happened to hit, the travel time for waves to hit the tip of India was four hours. That's enough time for a warning. In Thailand, officials reportedly played down warnings afraid that if there was a false alarm, tourism might be seriously damages as had happened once before.

    Q: Were there any oddities about the quake besides this?

    A: The quake was rated a 6.4 on the Richter scale according to an official at the Bureau of Meteorology and Geophysics in Jakarta. But the U.S. Geological Survey measured the earthquake at a magnitude of 8.1. The assessment significantly underestimated the size and impact of the quake.

    Q: When were people in the affected regions warned?

    A: Officials in Thailand issued the only warnings of the impending disaster, but broadcasts beamed to tourist resorts in the country's south underestimated the threat and a Web site caution was not posted until three hours after the first waves hit.

    Q: Was anyone warned in time at all?

    A: Yes. The NOAA immediately warned the U.S. Naval Station at Diego Garcia, which suffered very little damage from the tsunami. NOAA was able to get the warning to the US Navy base in the area, but says it was unable to contact the civil authorities in the region to warn them.

    Q: Was there any damage to Diego Garcia, the U.S. base in the Indian Ocean?

    A: None, although Diego Garcia, the southernmost island of the Chagos Archipelag, lies about 1,000 miles south of India and about 2,000 miles from the earthquake,s epicenter. Meanwhile, Somalia, nearly 3,000 from the earthquake,s center, reported more than 100 deaths in coastal areas. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Geological Survey, said damage differs greatly because of differences in the undersea topography. The numerous coral reefs may have dissipated some of the waves, impact on the British-owned island, resulting in only a slightly elevated tide, hardly noticeable to residents

    Q: Have tidal waves figured in weapons research?

    A: Yes. Secret wartime experiments were conducted off the New Zealand coast to create a bomb that would trigger tidal waves, according to government files declassified in Auckland. But the tsunami bomb was never fully tested and the war ended before the project was completed. Its mastermind was Thomas Leech, an Australian professor who was the dean of engineering at Auckland University from 1940 to 1950. He set off a series of underwater explosions that caused mini tidal waves at Whangaparaoa, north of Auckland, in 1944 and 1945. Details of the research, known as Project Seal, are contained in 53- year-old documents released by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

    Q: Is it possible for a nuclear explosion to have triggered the Macquarie quake in some way and indirectly caused the changes that led to the Sumatra quake and the Asian tsunami?

    A: It is possible that a very large explosion might have triggered the first quake directly in some way or that repeated prior testing could have induced changes that led to the quake indirectly, but research on the fall-out of nuclear testing is so highly classified that little is known of the possible impact. The U.S. has not ratified the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, leaving the door open to future U.S. testing despite an extended moratorium. There has already been a strong move toward resumption of testing since 2002. Now earth-penetrating nukes (bunker busters) and mini-nukes might provide the pretext.

    Lila Rajiva is a free-lance journalist in the Baltimore area and the author of "The Language of Empire: Abu Ghraib and the American Media," to be released by Monthly Review Press in 2005 Spring. She can be reached at: [email protected]



    http://www.rense.com/general61/earthquakestsunamisand.htm
     
  3. !@#$%

    [email protected]#$% Moderator Crew

    Joined: Oct 1, 2002 Messages: 18,517 Likes Received: 621
    a very weird thing i heard too...

    a little girl (about ten) from i think vritain had done a book report on tsunamis before she and her family went on vacation in thailand.

    when she saw the water recede, she knew a tsunami was coming and told her mom.
    they went and warned the hotel, who cleared the beach about 15 minutes before the wave hit.

    no one staying at that hotel died.

    education saves lives.
     
  4. wiseguy

    wiseguy Elite Member

    Joined: Mar 1, 2002 Messages: 2,543 Likes Received: 1
    this is where you went wrong...
     
  5. ODS-1

    ODS-1 Elite Member

    Joined: Jul 21, 2003 Messages: 3,575 Likes Received: 0
    I think that if there was nuclear testing going on someone would have reported radiation burns on bodies.
    Bottom line, this thing was caused by a gigantic fucking earthquake.
     
  6. AerosolTerrorist

    AerosolTerrorist Member

    Joined: Oct 8, 2004 Messages: 443 Likes Received: 0
    wow,everything is blamed on USA huh?..even tsunamis ....i think john titors world predictions are coming true.countries are blaming other countries for stuff..thees going to be a world war..watch out! :(
     
  7. Nekro

    Nekro Elite Member

    Joined: Feb 19, 2003 Messages: 2,568 Likes Received: 1
    What the fuck? The united states lit off retarded amounts of hydrogen and nuclear weapnons in the pacific in the 50s and didn't cause any tsunamis. All we did was destroy bikini atoll.
     
  8. AerosolTerrorist

    AerosolTerrorist Member

    Joined: Oct 8, 2004 Messages: 443 Likes Received: 0

    yeah thats true nekro,but people look for any reason to blame what happens..even mother nature cant ger her credit no more :huh2: .....its now United States did it.....heeh we start earthquakes now.. :haha:
     
  9. ODS-1

    ODS-1 Elite Member

    Joined: Jul 21, 2003 Messages: 3,575 Likes Received: 0
    I wish there was someones ass to kick for all this rain in my neck of the woods. It's getting ridiculous.
     
  10. villain

    villain Veteran Member

    Joined: Jul 12, 2002 Messages: 5,190 Likes Received: 2
    I was under the impression that it was not so much about the megatonnage of the bomb but the effects of it which is highly classified for some reason.
    Think about it.... A nuke is going to completely evaporate a swath of the ocean miles in diameter and then the rest of the ocean (we are talking tons and tons of water here ) is going to come crashing in on the hole.... definate tsunami potential i would say...
    not to mention the effects on the actual ocean floor.... which certainly if detonated near faultlines is going to have more catastrophic effects.
     
  11. AerosolTerrorist

    AerosolTerrorist Member

    Joined: Oct 8, 2004 Messages: 443 Likes Received: 0

    :haha: me too,its like non-stop..very anoying!
     
Top