Welcome!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

  1. Welcome to the 12ozProphet Forum...
    You are currently logged out and viewing our forum as a guest which only allows limited access to our discussions, photos and other forum features. If you are a 12ozProphet Member please login to get the full experience.

    If you are not a 12ozProphet Member, please take a moment to register to gain full access to our website and all of its features. As a 12ozProphet Member you will be able to post comments, start discussions, communicate privately with other members and access members-only content. Registration is fast, simple and free, so join today and be a part of the largest and longest running Graffiti, Art, Style & Culture forum online.

    Please note, if you are a 12ozProphet Member and are locked out of your account, you can recover your account using the 'lost password' link in the login form. If you no longer have access to the email you registered with, please email us at [email protected] and we'll help you recover your account. Welcome to the 12ozProphet Forum (and don't forget to follow @12ozprophet in Instagram)!

Today is the 60th Anniversary of Paris' Liberation from Nazi Occupation..

Discussion in 'Channel Zero' started by MIZZaBcfly, Aug 25, 2004.

  1. MIZZaBcfly

    MIZZaBcfly Member

    Joined: Jul 22, 2004 Messages: 326 Likes Received: 0
    ..and i really wanna send a priv9 message 2 a jewish friend of mine dat posts here....but i'm nah sure how the priv7 message thing works:eek:

    cud someone explain to me how it works....

    thanks in advance btw
     
  2. EyeforAnEYE

    EyeforAnEYE Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 29, 2003 Messages: 4,199 Likes Received: 3
    private messages don't work on this site

    also here so people won't get on your back

    PARIS Aug. 22, 2004 — There was little bread and barely any butter. Without coal, electricity or gas, Parisians were cooking meals on camp fires in the streets. By the summer of 1944, the French capital under the Nazi boot for four years was hungry, exhausted and seething with revenge.

    Allied troops began rolling in on Aug. 24, and a day later, church bells tolled. The city was liberated. But preparations for Wednesday's grandiose celebration to mark the anniversary rekindled the memory of another Paris: on its knees and set to unleash its fury.


    "There's so much that the French had been bottling up in hatred of their enemy," said David Wingeate Pike, a British World War II expert at the American University of Paris. "Paris had come to a humiliation it could never imagine before."

    The average Parisian lost 44 pounds during the Nazi occupation, which began June 14, 1940, he said.

    In those dire times, the elegant Jardin des Tuileries was covered with potato patches, and rabbit hutches replaced flower pots on apartment balconies to provide the prime ingredient for a coveted stew.

    "Paris was starving, without lights, without bread, without clothes," recalled 80-year-old Madeleine Riffaud, a member of the underground Resistance at the time.

    On July 23, 1944, Riffaud code-named Rainer volunteered to kill a Nazi to avenge the murder of a friend and "to show Parisians you can kill the occupier in broad daylight at 3 o'clock on a Sunday afternoon," she said in an interview.

    Not quite 20, she shot to death a "handsome officer" walking on the Solferino Bridge, near the Orsay train station today the famous Musee d'Orsay.

    "I killed that man, but I had no hate for him, I assure you," she said. "I was afraid."

    Riffaud, arrested, tortured then freed in a prisoner exchange, was among a minority actively working to subvert the Nazis. But her action was a sign of the rising fever taking hold within the underground and on the streets of Paris.

    On July 14, nine days before Riffaud took aim, 100,000 people rallied in the streets, some singing the "Marseillaise," France's national anthem. For the first time, French police did not intervene.

    There are no solid figures on how many people belonged to the Resistance, with its many clandestine, even rival, networks. Pike, the historian, said a widely accepted ballpark figure is 100,000 Resistance members nationwide in 1943.

    But small acts of resistance were part of everyday life.

    Josette Maulet, 10 years old in 1944, remembered helping her mother listen to clandestine radio broadcasts.

    "When my mother listened, I sang in the hallway so our collaborationist neighbor couldn't hear," Maulet said. The lady next door was known to consort with Nazi soldiers, she explained.

    After the liberation, many women who had trysts with Nazi occupiers were paraded through the streets, their hair shorn to shame them and swastikas painted on their foreheads underscoring French anger at those who collaborated.

    Maulet recalls the ration tickets and long lines needed to obtain meager portions of food. The social order was turned on its head, with children and laborers given larger portions than white-collar workers.

    Not everyone suffered to the same degree. A flourishing black market assured food and fineries for those who could afford it. The occupiers, meanwhile, helped themselves to everything.

    And Paris was still the City of Lights, despite it all, with fashion-conscious mademoiselles resorting to "bottled stockings," a special dye painted on the legs, to replace their ragged silk hose.

    Food became yet scarcer after the U.S.-led Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944 D-Day with Parisians deprived of the staples that had trickled in from the Normandy countryside.

    But the arrival of the Allies on French soil was, above all, a source of hope and a clarion call for Parisians to rise up. Orders for an insurrection went out from an underground Resistance bunker in southern Paris on Aug. 18. A day later, police officers in civilian clothes took over their headquarters. On Aug. 20, Paris City Hall was occupied.

    Parisians rose to the cause because "the occupation was shameful," said retired Col. Maurice Courdesses, a veteran of the 2nd French Armored Division, which helped liberate Paris along with the 4th American Infantry Division. "This shame had to be washed away."

    But a simpler reason provided the edge for revolt.

    "The mental reaction of people is guided by their stomachs," Courdesses said. "When they saw the landings, they saw the end of deprivation."

    http://a.abcnews.com/images/autowirestory/AP/PAR10508221533.jpeg'>

    [url=http://abcnews.go.com/wire/World/ap20040822_903.html]http://abcnews.go.com/wire/World/ap20040822_903.html[/url]
     
  3. sorry, private messaging is a disabled feature. use the email button on his profile or send him a white pigeon
     
  4. crave

    crave Veteran Member

    Joined: Jan 20, 2002 Messages: 6,728 Likes Received: 10
    thank a soldier.
     
  5. MIZZaBcfly

    MIZZaBcfly Member

    Joined: Jul 22, 2004 Messages: 326 Likes Received: 0
    oh i see...thanks fe ya help inanyways

    *skips away ta find a white pigeon*
     
  6. EyeforAnEYE

    EyeforAnEYE Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 29, 2003 Messages: 4,199 Likes Received: 3
    On a related note, I have been watching Band Of Brothers again for the 3rd time. This has to be one of the best movie/show whatever it may be, ever.
     
  7. Pinup

    Pinup Senior Member

    Joined: Mar 13, 2003 Messages: 2,208 Likes Received: 0
    <--- went to the ball in the Luxemburg gardens to celebrate the anniversary
     
  8. High Priest

    High Priest Elite Member

    Joined: Jan 1, 2002 Messages: 4,928 Likes Received: 3
    Remember on the muppets there was that french cook? That dude made me laugh.
     
  9. Kr430n5_666

    Kr430n5_666 Banned

    Joined: Oct 6, 2004 Messages: 19,229 Likes Received: 30
  10. crave

    crave Veteran Member

    Joined: Jan 20, 2002 Messages: 6,728 Likes Received: 10
    i couldn't agree with more. i've watched the series a couple of times myself.
     
  11. Brewster Baker

    Brewster Baker 12oz Loyalist

    Joined: Sep 11, 2003 Messages: 13,012 Likes Received: 529
  12. Dr. Dazzle

    Dr. Dazzle Veteran Member

    Joined: Nov 19, 2001 Messages: 8,147 Likes Received: 3
    Agreed. My only complaint was that it barely even mentions anyone else's involvement in the war, apart from when they rescue the British troops. But I guess that wasn't the point. In which case, I have no complaint. Carry on......


    *It's my life ambition to make a huge, epic 30 part series better than Band of Brothers. Just thought I'd share.....
     
  13. KING BLING

    KING BLING Guest

    After the liberation, many women who had trysts with Nazi occupiers were paraded through the streets, their hair shorn to shame them and swastikas painted on their foreheads underscoring French anger at those who collaborated
     
  14. 60 years anniversaries for alot of WW2 shit is coming right now...
     
  15. Pilau Hands

    Pilau Hands Guest

    Rainer ain't no joke.
     
Top