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The Off Grid living thread (Dropping out the rat race)

Discussion in 'Channel Zero' started by misteraven, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Some of the flock... We bought our birds locally as the local breeds are better acclimated to the weather. Chickens do best at temperatures between 40 and 75 degrees F. They actually deal with cold far better than heat and have no trouble at temps down to about -20 below so long as they can stay completely dry and out of the wind. On the other hand, temps up to 95+ get pretty dangerous. Ducks are even better suited and if I break the ice up on the kiddie pool, they're happy to jump in even when its 10 degrees outside. No idea how they do that, but they in fact complain if they don't have water to play in. Ducks are far smarter than chickens and have a personality similar to dogs. Chickens are just blank all the time and though they can be very friendly if handled regularly are literally dumb as rocks. The chickens lay very regularly and we get about 12 eggs a day when the whether is decent and there's plenty of sun. The ducks lay maybe 2 - 3 eggs a day and only when the weather is nice and the days are long. (Birds lay according to light so in the short days of winter, they lay far less).

    Duck eggs are super amazing and I suggest you guys go seek out a whole foods or whatever and try it. Like a better tasting, richer chicken egg thats also a bit bigger. Also, farm fresh eggs from organic free range birds are next level.

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    Dirty_habiT and lord_casek like this.
  2. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Some general shots from summer... My daughter helping handle my friends working dog pups and some other stuff...

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  3. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Here's what homestead type meals look like, including the aforementioned duck eggs. According to Paleo (and my doctor, health issues relating cholesterol have to do with LDL and the mechanism (size) of the vehicle that encapsulates cholesterol and not with how much of it you consume). As such, we eat eggs almost every day and so far blood tests have proven out that there's been zero negative impact (contradicting the shit they teach you in school about not eating eggs more than twice a week). Eggs are actually a very nutrient dense food. The dutch baby shown below.... Not so much, but very tasty.

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    Dirty_habiT, Fist 666 and lord_casek like this.
  4. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Here's what winter out here is like... Negative temps, 300"+ of snow. Our home has a AAA energy rating due to triple planed glass, double thick insulation and the way it was designed. Our energy bill is a quarter of what it used to be, despite our being 4x the size of our old place. Mostly we heat with a single wood stove and if you take the time top process your own wood, just takes time and sweat. Its actually pretty fun, since the last few times I go out with my K9 trainer friend and we just hang out and talk shit while culling standing dead trees. We've come to see that it takes about 5 cords to make it through winter (it snows about 5 months out of the year) and a cord (for those that don't know) is a split, tightly organized stack about 4 x 4 x 8 ft. Because my wife likes to keep our home Haiti hot despite arctic temps outside, we probably need more like 7 cords to get through the winter. Got my chainsaw late in the season, but plan is to try and stack up 15+ cords come summer.

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  5. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    What Winter out here looks like...

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  6. lord_casek

    lord_casek 12oz Royalty

    Joined: Jan 24, 2006 Messages: 27,127 Likes Received: 1,050
    Fantastic pics!

    Have you eaten Moose yet?
     
  7. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Thanks man. Just shit I took with my iPhone. Have a bunch of nice studio cameras but they're either too expensive or too big to lug around and havent gotten around to getting a nice EDC point and shoot yet.

    Nope, but I've had elk, which is really great. I was too busy during hunting season to participate and dont have enough experience to not go with someone anyways so will need to wait until next season. Moose is a hard tag to get, but deer is just handed out and elk tags aren't too hard. Its not unusual to see a herd almost a 100 deep of deer in our yard at certain times a year. Also been seeing mink around, but beyond that we have coyote, wolves, brown and black bears, elk, moose, otter and all kinds of other stuff.
     
    lord_casek likes this.
  8. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    @lord_casek Just noticed your avatar... That a legit MP5 or a clone? Nice either way. Fun gun to shoot for sure, especially if it still has a giggle switch on it.
     
  9. lord_casek

    lord_casek 12oz Royalty

    Joined: Jan 24, 2006 Messages: 27,127 Likes Received: 1,050
    I've never had Moose or Elk, but I hear that both make an excellent stew. If you haven't had battered and fried deer steaks yet I seriously suggest you try some.
    Legit MP5. That's not me in the pic, btw. I look similar to that guy, though.
     
  10. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Elk and moose tenderloin is supposed to be better than filet mignon. I've had elk medallions and those are freakin awesome. Definitely on par with the best steaks I've had. Yeah, have a chest freezer and planning an optic for my 308, so its definitely on next season as far as deer goes.
     
    Fist 666 likes this.
  11. SpyD

    SpyD Elite Member

    Joined: Aug 22, 2002 Messages: 3,093 Likes Received: 62
    Nice pics Raven. Looks awesome out there.
     
    misteraven likes this.
  12. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    Yeah man, best place on earth as far as I'm concerned. These photos really do it no justice.
     
  13. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,140 Likes Received: 992
    Elk is hands down my favorite meat (nh). Ostrich is up there, too, surprisingly.

    I'll try to add a bit to this thread this weekend. The core of this is absolutely where my heart and head are at and last fall I moved away from a suburban Denver cookie-cutter house to 13.5 acres in Western North Carolina. By no means are we off-grid, but we definitely feel out of the rat race.

    I'm super anxious/ready for spring for the gardening aspect of my place.

    My brother has recently gotten into milling logs and has been talking to me about it as well. I've got a ton of killer hardwoods (nh again) on my land that are potentially $20k+ trees that could help pay for a lot of upgrades and projects.
     
    misteraven likes this.
  14. misteraven

    misteraven Administrator

    Joined: May 7, 1999 Messages: 8,901 Likes Received: 376
    @Fist 666 Nice, looking forward to your photos.

    Spring is definitely cool, but I actually really enjoy winters out here. There's definitely some challenges, but its so beautiful and also cozy. Plus I have a season pass at the local resort so have been snowboarding a ton. That said, I definitely wasn't as prepared as I should have been. Granted I wasn't raising birds last winter, so definitely learning a lot about what I should be doing to make maintenance a lot easier come spring when I can do it. Definitely need to finish off my coop, get some lights and electricity out there, as well as get the auto feeders and a method to keep water out there without freezing and without having to refill every day, let alone several times a day.

    Also, got my chainsaw and started cutting wood way too late, so for sure going to put real effort into it when the weather is good. In fact, thinking of buying a dump trailer down in Florida where my parents are and bringing it up here where they seem to cost 3x as much. This winter a cord of wood is going for about $220 delivered and that's no more than an hour or two if you have two guys and and an easy way to haul it.

    Will likely increase my flock in the spring and if I have the time and extra cash, wanted to put in another 4 - 6 raised beds (surprisingly expensive since its all redwood and has organic dirt filled. Costs me about $800 each to put in). Also need to redo part of the orchard I put in since the deer decimated it last fall while I was still working on the game fence. (Deer can dump an 8 - 10 foot fence if they can see whats on the other side and feel safe about clearing it, especially if they're being pursued).

    Would love to mill some logs myself. Was thinking of setting up an Alaskan Mill just to see if I could rough out some planks for some of what I'm doing out with the animals. Though about a quarter of my property is heavily forested, its all super mature trees and also tough to pull out since a lot of it at a much lower grade. Tradeoff was I managed to score a bunch of river frontage and also have about 15 acres of pasture (currently planted with alfalfa).
     
  15. Hua Guofang

    Hua Guofang Dirty Dozen Crew

    Joined: Oct 29, 2013 Messages: 1,844 Likes Received: 405
    Dang.

    Inspirational.

    I’m literally begging the wife.
     
    misteraven likes this.
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