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Share your grandparents war stories....

Discussion in 'Channel Zero' started by Dr. Dazzle, Jun 2, 2004.

  1. Dr. Dazzle

    Dr. Dazzle Veteran Member

    Joined: Nov 19, 2001 Messages: 8,147 Likes Received: 3
    So, as some of you may or may not know, June 6th will be the 60th anniversary of D-Day. If you need an explanation of what D-Day was, then please, leave this thread now.

    Now chances are that nearly everyone on here had grandparents that were involved in World War II. I think we should take the time to share some of their stories with others. Time is ticking away and their are fewer and fewer veterans alive each year.

    In a somewhat lacklustre commemoration, this is where we can tell the stories that have been told to us. Some are emotional, some are horrific, some are just plain badass. So yeah, let's here them.



    Grandad 1 - Like most people who fought in the war, he didn't talk about it once he got home. Even my dad doesn't know what he went through. All I know is that he fought in North Africa, and Italy for sure. He died when I was 4, so I never got a chance to talk to him about it.

    Grandad 2 - I talked to him about the war when I was back in England (I should mention that both my grandparents fought for the British). He started off in Africa, but he didn't go in to too much detail about what he did. He mainly talked about how once the fighting had stopped, that the Allies and the German soldiers were all friendly together. They all hung out in like Tunisian hotels all being friends with each other, and there was no animosity. He joined the campaign in Europe towards the end, when the Allies had already advanced deep in to Germany. He was given the job as a delivery driver, which meant that a young kid who had never been behind the wheel before was driving huge trucks with tanks strapped to the back of them across Europe to deliver to the front lines. The only real resistance he had to deal with was with snipers and other infantrymen left behind. He told me a story of how he was walking beside one of the convoys in a forest, and the guy in front of him just got popped in the head and went down. They found the sniper who did it, he was already dead. My grandad said that he was only 17 years old.

    He also told me how he got to see first hand the Bergen (I believe) concentration camp. By the time he got there it had mostly been cleaned up but he still saw piles of bodies, huge piles of glasses and shoes and clothes. I can't imagine what it would be like to walk in on something like that.

    As I said, though, he really came in towards the end, and most of the fighting was already done. He said he spent most of his time in France and Germany, living in hotels and being treated like gods by the locals. The way he talked about it, it didn't sound too bad :D



    So yeah, that's my granddad's experience. Not really too exciting, haha. It would be cool if anyone on here had stories from the German side, I know that my brother's friend's grandad was a German pilot or something. Yeah, this could be cool if anyone actually cares. But it doesn't mention tits or cars or something so most of you probably won't...

    *Interesting sidenote, the History Channel is showing programs to commemorate D-Day all week long. You should definitely be checking them out....

    Bleh.
     
  2. Devilush

    Devilush 12oz Legend

    Joined: Feb 1, 2001 Messages: 17,035 Likes Received: 2
    great thread! you know who would love it. he has stories up his ass about this.
     
  3. LaCosaNostra

    LaCosaNostra Senior Member

    Joined: Feb 3, 2004 Messages: 2,191 Likes Received: 0
    I don't have any grandfathers....RIP
     
  4. Vanity

    Vanity Veteran Member

    Joined: Apr 11, 2000 Messages: 7,673 Likes Received: 6
    my grandpa stole some dude's identity so he could get veteran's benefits
     
  5. LaCosaNostra

    LaCosaNostra Senior Member

    Joined: Feb 3, 2004 Messages: 2,191 Likes Received: 0
    ahha, thats hardcore//
     
  6. Dr. Dazzle

    Dr. Dazzle Veteran Member

    Joined: Nov 19, 2001 Messages: 8,147 Likes Received: 3
    Get him on this. I think me and him are probably the only ones who actually care.....
     
  7. EyeforAnEYE

    EyeforAnEYE Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 29, 2003 Messages: 4,199 Likes Received: 3
    Never met my dad's dad. And my moms dad didn't really know him.
     
  8. villain

    villain Veteran Member

    Joined: Jul 12, 2002 Messages: 5,190 Likes Received: 2
    My grandma just sent me some actually... I have more somewhere... I gotta find them...




    **** ****** came home to the ****** house when I was about 15, He
    didn't
    talk much about it. But one day before he came home I found a few
    e-mail
    letters in the closet upstairs in the room that was his before he went
    away and I read them, they were not about the war but because they
    were
    from him in Europe it was very moving. They were letters to his
    parents.
    I have never told any one that I read those letters and I never saw
    them
    again.

    He was a Staff Sergeant and the Company Clerk. When we went to his
    Company Reunion the guys used to get away from the women and talk but
    I
    really didn't hear much from him about the war. I do not think he ever
    really got over those experiences, We went to those reunions a lot of
    times. We never talked about his experiences. I did sometimes overhear
    the guys talking but it was usually something funny or they made it
    sound
    funny. They didn't talk serious stuff if any women were around.

    All of our Family including our Brothers and our Boys and now our
    Grandsons and a Granddaughters are doing their share to make our
    country
    safe for the next generations. We are very proud of what they are
    doing.
    And want them to know that we care. America is dedicated to the
    security
    of the world and all the people in it.

    Yesterday while watching the dedication ***** brought out his leather
    case with his medals in it and talked a bit about them. He has 3
    battle
    stars and several other items in it. He thinks people do not care
    about
    what they did. But yesterday's program showed me that a lot of people
    still alive,
    still care a lot and still hurt a lot. He showed me a picture of a
    pontoon bridge that his outfit built to go across the river. He has
    told
    me about his group crossing that bridge and his seeing a pile of brush
    and rubbish floating toward them as they were crossing, he realized it
    could be a problem and pulled up his gun and fired it at the pile
    which
    exploded, It didn't get to the pontoon bridge and they went on
    across. It
    was a long bridge and could have been a big loss if it had reached the
    bridge. No recognition was ever made of it but it is something he will
    never forget.

    It is hard to get him to talk about the bad stuff but he saw plenty of
    action including his group going into a German prison camp and the
    experience of what he saw and the look of those starving people as
    they
    were taken out. The piles of bones and piles of teeth with gold in
    them,
    He has told me of shooting out the steeple of a church and killing the
    sniper that was shooting at him. And the lady being removed from her
    house and how she very carefully stepped over one of the front steps.
    After she passed him he shot up the step which exploded. If any of
    them
    had stepped on it they would have been goners. These are just a few of
    the memories he has of those experiences. I cannot get him to write
    any
    of this down except His description of the radio antenna he put up
    out of
    the Plexiglass canopy of the fighter plane. It is going to be
    published
    in a book about the **th division. We saw it in a movie once. And I
    have
    seen pictures.

    Sure they did some fun things like when they found the big wine
    cellar
    and had a celebration. And about being in the hospital when his
    buddies
    were shipped home. He was too sick to go with them so he ended up
    staying
    in Germany and working with the recovery program for almost a year
    after
    the war was over.
     
  9. InDY_500

    InDY_500 Veteran Member

    Joined: Sep 30, 2002 Messages: 5,169 Likes Received: 67
    My grandparents never talked about the war but this guy I used to work with was always talking about how many people he killed during the war and how when they were digging holes so they could stuff the dead bodies in them he would be takin pictures of all the dead bodies.......He said that when he went to get them developed the photo place took all the ones that had the gruesome parts out cause the gov't didnt want anyone taking back photo's to the states.....This guy was trippin me out the entire time....Talking in description about how he killed people with his fuckin kinfe.....Crazy ass stories.....
     
  10. effyoo

    effyoo Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 2, 2002 Messages: 4,703 Likes Received: 0
    I only asked my Grandpa about fighting in the war once, and you could tell he was very uncomfortable telling stories about what he saw.

    But what he told me was that he was a radio operator in a tank. One day he was called to report to his commanding officer back at headquarters or whatever you want to call it. So he goes and talks to his CO, he said he was gone no longer than half an hour, and when he returned he found his tank destroyed and everyone inside dead.

    Thats all he would say about it. Much respect goes to the men and women who fought in WWII
     
  11. TheoHuxtable

    TheoHuxtable Senior Member

    Joined: Jan 5, 2004 Messages: 2,113 Likes Received: 1
    My grandfather really didn't tell me too many war stories.

    All I know was that in WWII he was at the Battle of Leyte Gulf in the Phillipines. And he moved around from Hawaii to Okinawa as well.
     
  12. iloveboxcars

    iloveboxcars 12oz Royalty

    Joined: Jul 29, 2002 Messages: 20,505 Likes Received: 440
    I was 3 when my grandfather died. My dad says after he came back he didn't talk much.. but when I'd go to visit he'd play with me all day. I remember next to nothing about him now, but some how I still miss him.
     
  13. se_FOUR

    se_FOUR Senior Member

    Joined: Aug 27, 2002 Messages: 1,796 Likes Received: 1
    One was stationed in Burma, he had his right leg blown off and was stung by a scorpian..he`s like 85 now..Was a P.T instructor and a boxer for his regiment..

    The other was in the Navy..

    Both don`t talk about about at all, tho I did hear from my mum that the Navy grandad had to help pull dead kids out of a primary school that had been bombed..So for good reason he doesn`t really want to talk to much on that subject..

    Both alive and still kicking, well hopping the the case of my other grandad..
     
  14. My country was occupied by the germans for 5 years, from 16th April 1940 to 5th May 1945. I remember my grandparents would talk about the occupation from time to time. They were minorly involved in the resistance movement. They mainly hide people that were on the run from the germans, help them with food and shelter and so on.

    My dad had a pyjamas made from a parachute, people used anything they could get their hands on cause supplies of everything was so short, everything was rationed. Allied troops were very popular, they would have chocolate and cigarettes which had been very rare during the war.

    Its a national tradition to place lit candles in your windows on the evening of May 4th, to commemorate the liberation. During the war a law was made by the germans that all houses should be blackened with thick black drapes so allied planes couldnt see the cities and bomb them. When the liberation came, huge fires were build in the streets with all the drapes.
     
  15. thecarwreck

    thecarwreck Senior Member

    Joined: May 14, 2003 Messages: 1,006 Likes Received: 67
    Not my grandfathers' but still tough, the abridged version:

    My girlfriend's uncle was in the infantry in Japan. After a day or two of fighting all these bodies were floating down the river they were camped next to. They had to wade out into the river to retrieve these bodies (for whatever reason) and all he can remember is the massive amount of maggots crawling all over the half-decomposed corpses. He says he quit eating rice because of that.

    She also did a paper as an undergrad on WWII aerial photographers that put her in touch with some gnarly old guys from the 91st Bomb Group who are all about telling their stories.

    We need more shit in here from the Europe(an) perspective too... History geeks rise up. I just think it's funny that Americans are so apt to forget that we weren't the only ones fighting.
     
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