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North korea..stand up

Discussion in 'Channel Zero' started by 2 blaazed, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. 2 blaazed

    2 blaazed New Jack

    Joined: Jun 28, 2002 Messages: 0 Likes Received: 3
    [​IMG]


    A South Korean woman paralyzed for 20 years is walking again after scientists say they repaired her damaged spine using stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood.

    Hwang Mi-Soon, 37, had been bedridden since damaging her back in an accident two decades ago.

    Last week her eyes glistened with tears as she walked again with the help of a walking frame at a press conference where South Korea researchers went public for the first time with the results of their stem-cell therapy.

    They said it was the world's first published case in which a patient with spinal cord injuries had been successfully treated with stem cells from umbilical cord blood.

    Though they cautioned that more research was needed and verification from international experts was required, the South Korean researchers said Hwang's case could signal a leap forward in the treatment of spinal cord injuries.

    The use of stem cells from cord blood could also point to a way to side-step the ethical dispute over the controversial use of embryos in embryonic stem-cell research.

    "We have glimpsed at a silver lining over the horizon," said Song Chang-Hoon, a member of the research team and a professor at Chosun University's medical school in the southwestern city of Kwangju.

    "We were all surprised at the fast improvements in the patient."

    Under TV lights and flashing cameras, Hwang stood up from her wheelchair and shuffled forward and back a few paces with the help of the frame at the press conference here on Thursday.

    "This is already a miracle for me," she said. "I never dreamed of getting to my feet again."

    Medical research has shown stem cells can develop into replacement cells for damaged organs or body parts. Unlocking that potential could see cures for diseases that are at present incurable, or even see the body generate new organs to replace damaged or failing ones.

    So-called "multipotent" stem cells -- those found in cord blood -- are capable of forming a limited number of specialised cell types, unlike the more versatile "undifferentiated" cells that are derived from embroyos.

    However, these stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood have emerged as an ethical and safe alternative to embryonic stem cells.

    Clinical trials with embryonic stem cells are believed to be years away because of the risks and ethical problems involved in the production of embryos -- regarded as living humans by some people -- for scientific use.

    In contrast, there is no ethical dimension when stem cells from umbilical cord blood are obtained, according to researchers.

    Additionally, umbilical cord blood stem cells trigger little immune response in the recipient as embryonic stem cells have a tendency to form tumors when injected into animals or human beings.

    For the therapy, multipotent stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood, which had been frozen immediately after the birth of a baby and cultured for a period of time.

    Then these cells were directly injected to the damaged part of the spinal cord.

    "Technical difficulties exist in isolating stem cells from frozen umbilical cord blood, finding cells with genes matching those of the recipient and selecting the right place of the body to deliver the cells," said Han Hoon, president of Histostem, a government-backed umbilical cord blood bank in Seoul.

    Han teamed up with Song and other experts for the experiment.

    They say that more experiments are required to verify the outcome of the landmark therapy.

    "It is just one case and we need more experiments, more data," said Oh Il-Hoon, another researcher.

    "I believe experts in other countries have been conducting similar experiments and accumulating data before making the results public."

    http://sg.news.yahoo.com/041128/1/3...ml#unbelievable
     
  2. Abracadabra

    Abracadabra Dirty Dozen Crew

    Joined: Dec 28, 2001 Messages: 22,906 Likes Received: 113
    fuckin hollerific, that's awesome. go korea.
     
  3. Pinup

    Pinup Senior Member

    Joined: Mar 13, 2003 Messages: 2,208 Likes Received: 0
    So wait... North or South Korea ?
     
  4. fatalist

    fatalist Dirty Dozen Crew

    Joined: Mar 10, 2004 Messages: 6,354 Likes Received: 25
    damn, that's fuckin awesome
     
  5. T=E=A=S=E

    T=E=A=S=E Elite Member

    Joined: Mar 27, 2004 Messages: 3,271 Likes Received: 0
    medicine sure is amazing.

    wow.
     
  6. Overtime

    Overtime Dirty Dozen Crew

    Joined: Apr 22, 2003 Messages: 13,986 Likes Received: 311
    hell yeah, now if only they could make christopher reeves walk.....oh wait,,,,,
     
  7. ledzep

    ledzep Junior Member

    Joined: Feb 21, 2002 Messages: 146 Likes Received: 1
    fuck yes, those guys are fucking geniuses.

    A++ South Korea, A++
     
  8. mackfatsoe

    mackfatsoe Veteran Member

    Joined: Oct 8, 2004 Messages: 6,532 Likes Received: 168
    reminds me of the south park when christopher reeves sucked the blood out of dead babies to gain the strength to walk. woot woot stem cell research woot woot.
     
  9. Kr430n5_666

    Kr430n5_666 Banned

    Joined: Oct 6, 2004 Messages: 19,229 Likes Received: 30
  10. Ferris Bueller

    Ferris Bueller Elite Member

    Joined: Oct 25, 2000 Messages: 4,246 Likes Received: 71
    I was thinking the same thing Mams was thinking.
    Thank you, President Bush.
     
  11. duh-rye-won

    duh-rye-won Member

    Joined: Aug 8, 2001 Messages: 580 Likes Received: 2
    that's pretty incredible.

    but this shit really scares the shit out of me.

    i'm not against it.

    it just scares me.

    when we are old dudes chillin in the 12oz retirement home, the world is going to be a very wild place.
     
  12. effyoo

    effyoo Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 2, 2002 Messages: 4,703 Likes Received: 0
    if you want to debate the ethics of this, i won't front, i'll be the first to say that science like this should be encouaged no matter what your beliefs are.

    if you disagree, just wait until someone you love has trouble walking due to possible nerve damage.
     
  13. duh-rye-won

    duh-rye-won Member

    Joined: Aug 8, 2001 Messages: 580 Likes Received: 2
    i SAAAAAAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIIIID i wasn't against it.

    sheesh.
     
  14. effyoo

    effyoo Elite Member

    Joined: Sep 2, 2002 Messages: 4,703 Likes Received: 0
    DUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUDE, i was just responding to the topic in general.

    but yeah, think about how crazy things are going to be in 2064.
    my grandpa was the first guy to own a car in his town and he died knowing how to use the internet. what will papa effyoo be telling stories about then?
     
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