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Bonsai Trees

Discussion in 'Art & Design' started by Port-A-John Enthusiest, May 13, 2009.

  1. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    just read a bunch of this thread.

    i started planting shit for the first time in my life this last summer.
    a lot of what i did is already dead (or waiting for spring??).

    it seems i have a lot to learn. (i admittedly have no idea what i'm doing)
    my biggest concern is my japanese dwarf cedar--about a month after i planted it it started getting brown spots, now about 5 months later it is mostly brown--have i completely fucked it or can i save it? its potted with standard potting soil and steer manure.

    recommendations for good "getting started" books?
     
  2. Picky P.

    Picky P. Member

    Joined: May 1, 2004 Messages: 603 Likes Received: 12
    there are a lot of them out there. i just got craig coussins' bonsai school and bonsai master class in the mail a few weeks ago. good info in both, but bonsai school would get you going and is reasonably in depth as a starter voulme. got a used one on amazon for less that $15.

    go here in the meantime. lots of good info to be had there. i really don't know enough to tell you whether the manure is good or not for that kind of cedar, but they definitely prefer to grow in a well draining soil mix that doesn't keep them too wet. usually it's mostly coarse sand, with some inorganic and organic matter thrown in. (i.e., aged bark for organics and volcanic rock or turface for your inorganics in 'most' cases) everybody seems to have their own preference based on where they're growing bonsai. did you repot it into that mix?
     
    Fist 666 likes this.
  3. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    yeah i repotted.
    maybe its just too rainy here (tacoma, wa) to try moisture sensitive stuff outside?
    is it okay to repot at this time of year when frost is likely? or since its pretty well fucked just give it a shot?

    thanks for the help. gonna order the bonsai school tonight.
     
  4. Picky P.

    Picky P. Member

    Joined: May 1, 2004 Messages: 603 Likes Received: 12
    no problem, man..i just joined the local bonsai club this month, so i'll probably be getting my knowledge on a lot this year. i'd probably try to let it ride out the winter if possible at this point, just because when you repot it's going to stress the tree and with the harsh conditions just won't be good if it's already stressed like that. are you familiar with mycorrhizae? that's my other concern. most times when you repot a conifer or evergreen you want to take the old soil and mix it with some water and then pour the liquid over the top of your repotted tree to make sure that the beneficial (i think it's technically a fungus, but the two have a symbiotic relationship that helps the tree get the most out of its soil) business gets reintroduced. at this point i'd just let it ride and see what happens with a repot in the spring. bonsai is a great patience builder that way. and if it dies, try it over again. i've learned something every time i've killed a tree.
     
  5. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    thanks, i'll just wait another month or so then til it lightens up.

    my wife told me about this place, elandan gardens. which isn't too far a drive for me. i'll be going there in a month or two. will def get some pics.

    and i learned that weyerhauser has a garden with 60 bonsai about 20 minutes away. hurrah.

    i guess i should start a flickr for this coming season...
     
  6. Picky P.

    Picky P. Member

    Joined: May 1, 2004 Messages: 603 Likes Received: 12
    word up! i've been past that area once, and i've definitely heard of the weyerhauser garden. should be an awesome trip. i've been working on my soil mix theory for the coming spring and i've repotted a few indoor small pieces i've been working on...flicks coming soon.
     
  7. Frate_Raper

    Frate_Raper Veteran Member

    Joined: Aug 20, 2000 Messages: 7,973 Likes Received: 169
    It's in my opinion that transplanting any coniferous plant in the winter is a bad idea. It is alive through out the winter and the freeze thaw cycles that naturally occur it will try to absorb some form of moisture. Some people will say soak it before the ground freezes, but thats not enough unless your going at it ever warm day that you can run a hose on it,its useless...wait it out. If it can't not take up moisture the small root hairs will go first, then you will see browning and eventually die back. I've been on installs that contractors pushed on and planted anyway and lost 900 hick yews,and thousands of dollars.


    I'm not a small container gardener at all,so I don't know what steps you guys are taking in the pruning of the root balls.I avoid small containers in my designs,but I have worked a lot on large scale containers on roof tops or in condo complexes.
     
  8. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    its sad to see this thread get so little attention. i'm going to post in here and probably start a thread of its own in channel zero.

    I've had some success and failure this year with bonsai. Most of my success has been with dwarf rhododendrons, though. had a 'blue planet' that was thriving and then had a hot week and lost all of its needles, shoulda moved it inside i now know.

    Here are some pictures from my trip this week to the Weyerhauser Bonsai Garden in Federal Way, WA.
    [​IMG]

    Mountain Hemlock
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    Elephant Bush, 1960
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    Sweet Plum, 1973
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    Willow Leaf Fig, 1976
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    Rock and Water Penjing, 1990
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    Chinese Banyan, 1985
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    Jasmine Orange, 1955
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    Green Island Fig, 1965
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    Chinese Juniper on Sierra Juniper, Bonsai since 1970 trunk is dated to ca 1000
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    Hinoki Cypress, 1983
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    Catlin Elm, 1973
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    Trident Maple, 1950
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    Satsuki Azalea, 1990
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    Japanese White Pine, Unknown
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    Chinese Elm, 1985
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    Satsuki Azalea, 1910, grown since 1880
     
  9. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    [​IMG]

    Korean Horbeam, 1975
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    Japese Maple, 1964, there are 59 trees growing in this piece
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    Chinese Elm, 1975
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    Chinese Hackberry, 1952, the tree was over 20 feet tall before it was cut down and then the stump was saved for its potential.
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    Japanese Maple, 1968
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    Cork Bark Japanese Black Pine, 1965
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    Tucker Oak, 1940, tree dated to 1840
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    Golden Atlas Cedar,1957
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    Sierra Juniper, 1991
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    Creeping Juniper, 1940
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    Satsuki Azalea 1975
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    Japanese Red Pine, 1990
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    Eastern White Cedar, 1989, tree dated to 1750ca
     
  10. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    [​IMG]
    Mountain Hemlock, 1986, tree dated to 1870


    [​IMG]


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    American Larch, 1972, tree since 1830
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    Creeping Juniper, 1957
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    Coast Redwood, 1957
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    Sierra Juniper, 1975, tree dated to 1700
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    Satsuki Azalea, 1975
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    Eastern White Cedar, 1992, tree dated to 1770
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    Creeping Hydrangea, 1989, plant since 1960
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    Western Hemlock, 1965, tree since 1930

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    Trident Maple, 1971, 25 trees in this saikei
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    [​IMG]

    Formosan Juniper, 1962
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    Japanese White Pine with Spruce, 1976
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    Japanese Beech, 1958


    [​IMG]

    Olive, 1969, this tree was taken from an olive orchard planted in 1880
     
  11. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    San Jose Juniper, 1982
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    Chinese Elm, 1985
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    Japanese Black Pine, 1950
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    Shimpaku Juniper, 1980
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    Blue Atlas Cedar, 1969
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    Kishu Juniper grafted on San Jose Juniper, 1981, trunk from 1950
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    Catlin Elm, 1970
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    Silverberry, 1946
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    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Formosan Juniper, 1959
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    Mugo Pine and Ezo Spruce, 1985
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    Chinese Elm, bonsai since 1980
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    Japanese Maple, 1956
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    Bald Cypress, 1972
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    Satsuki Azalea, 1960
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    Formosan Hackberry, 1975, tree dated to 1780
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Western Hemlock, bonsai since 1991, tree date unknown


    If you're ever in the area this place is amazing. I went in the spring and there were about 10 different trees that have been rotated in/out since then. Spring is also great because there is the rhododendron garden there that is absolutely phenomenal.
     
  12. da1lyoperations

    da1lyoperations Senior Member

    Joined: Apr 18, 2010 Messages: 1,167 Likes Received: 137
    Bonsai trees have always amazed me, they fucking rule.
    I've tried to start my own, it's been surviving and growing for a few months. It's a Jacaranda tree, we have a few near home and smaller ones start to spread and grow so I dug a tiny one up and I've potted it, I'll take some photos after work.

    Don't know how it will turn out but here's some Google examples -

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. swif1

    swif1 Veteran Member

    Joined: Dec 13, 2001 Messages: 7,067 Likes Received: 29
    My dad has a few plants in the backyard that are wired up. It's obvious that using wires will affect a plant's growth and direction, but I never thought he's trying to grow bonsai trees. Time to take another look at them treez.
     
  14. Fist 666

    Fist 666 Moderator Crew

    Joined: Jun 16, 2007 Messages: 14,152 Likes Received: 1,003
    training trees with wire doesn't make them bonsai, i have two weeping atlas cedars that i'm training and a weeping larch that aren't bonsai.
     
  15. swif1

    swif1 Veteran Member

    Joined: Dec 13, 2001 Messages: 7,067 Likes Received: 29
    So it's called training trees? Haha that's awesome. I know training trees doesn't make them bonsai, but after viewing this thread it now made sense why one of the plants is in a shallow pot. He also has a shit ton of desert rose (Adenium obesum) plants. My mom constantly barked at him for having a backyard full of them, but he finally felt 75% of them were ready to be sold and sold they were. I don't know if the ones my dad has are considered bonsai, but I'll post some flicks when I can.
     
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